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box to measure voltages in a power supply

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Mario, Apr 18, 2004.

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  1. Mario

    Mario Guest

    Hello,

    I want to build a box to which i can connect a PC power supply
    connector and by switching knobs in the box i can measure if the
    correct voltage output is in each of the power supply pins.

    refer to as power supply pin out:
    http://www.hardwaresite.net/faqpowersupply.html

    In the box there will be the appropriate connector to to connect the
    pc power supply to be tested

    I will have a digital display to show the voltage measured.

    Question: this voltage digital displays exist ready to measure
    voltage? i mean without need of any IC? just plug the to points to
    measure voltage in between? do they exist? what are they called? if
    not exist what is the easiest solution ?

    I want to have a digital display and a knob, by switching the knob i
    select each pin of the power supply to be measured.

    Is this ok ? can I do this ? any better solution ?

    voltage range goes from -13VDC up to +13VDC

    can I use only one digital display ? please tell me your
    recommendation. I do know want by hand to measure each pin with a
    voltmeter.

    Please tell me the best solution that you recommend me.

    Thanks for your advice,

    Mario
     
  2. Fred Bloggs

    Fred Bloggs Guest

    "Auto Ranging Digital Panel Meter"
     
  3. Art

    Art Guest

    Jacks to connect a DMM to the sense terminals.
     
  4. Doesn't even need to be autoranging for a PC power supply if you already
    have a switch to select the input. Places like Jameco, Marlin P. Jones, etc.
    have inexpensive digital panel meters.

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: The email address in this message header may no longer work. To
    contact me, please use the feedback form on the S.E.R FAQ Web sites.
     
  5. Fred Bloggs

    Fred Bloggs Guest

    I've been through these fussy things before- even autopolarity is
    considered an extra. This one will work, fix jumper on VDC 20V.
    http://www.mpja.com/productview.asp?product=14505+ME -hopefully this
    means +/-20V.
     
  6. Will the unit under test be connected to a computer while being tested?
    If not, is it necessary to make these readings while the supply is under
    some load?

    You will need to connect a minimum load to the supply under test as they
    typically do not operate properly (or at all IIRC) unloaded.

    On the other hand, if you need to make these measurements while powering
    a system, most modern motherboards have on-board voltage (and
    temperature and fan RPM sensing). A simple application can provide this
    data on screen. It may not be as precise as a good panel meter, but you
    didn't specify the precision you needed.
     
  7. Yes. I've used similar meters and they work well enough, if not quite
    as stable as something costing 10 times as much. :)

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: The email address in this message header may no longer work. To
    contact me, please use the feedback form on the S.E.R FAQ Web sites.
     
  8. Genome

    Genome Guest

    |
    | Doesn't even need to be autoranging for a PC power supply if you
    already
    | have a switch to select the input. Places like Jameco, Marlin P.
    Jones, etc.
    | have inexpensive digital panel meters.
    |
    | --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page:
    http://www.repairfaq.org/
    | Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    | +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | | Mirror Site Info:
    http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html
    |
    | Important: The email address in this message header may no longer
    work. To
    | contact me, please use the feedback form on the S.E.R FAQ Web sites.
    |
    |

    **** me sideways.....

    Sam Goldwasser.

    **** me.

    DNA
     
  9. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    If it is for a PC, there are several single half height slot devices
    which do this, and even give thermal readings as well.

    Why try to re-invent the PC supply monitor? They are already out
    there.
     
  10. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    What an immature little twit you are.
     
  11. Fred Bloggs

    Fred Bloggs Guest

    It is not for a fixed PC- it is for PC repair shop- a $10 test rig.
     
  12. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    And the price of the half height slot device is still likely cheaper
    and more accurate than piecing one together.
     
  13. Dave Cole

    Dave Cole Guest

    Yes. try
    http://www.redlion.net/Products/DigitalandAnalog/DigitalPanelMeters/PAXLVD.h
    tml
    Rig your switch to reverse the + and - for negative supplies.

    Dave Cole
     
  14. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    But you still need a load, the slot device likely relies on the motherboard
    and such to load the PSU. I use some 12v automotive lightbulbs and measure
    the voltages with a DMM.
     
  15. Tweetldee

    Tweetldee Guest


    Look at the digital panel meter at
    http://www.mpja.com/productview.asp?product=14505+ME
    It's ranges are selectable by jumpers, and accepts either 5V (may share
    common ground with voltage being measured) or 9V (must be isolated from the
    coltage being measured) for its own power.
    Of course, you know that you must supply a minimum load to the main output
    of your PC supply (+5V or +3.3 V). And to properly test the PC supply, you
    should load all the outputs with resistors or other load having suitable
    power capacity. Since PC supplies come in many flavors of wattages and
    output voltages, your load switching arrangement needs to handle a wide
    range of voltages and currents. Use Ohm's law to determine the values and
    sizes or load resistors you need.
    Cheers!!!
     
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