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"Bottom entry" SMT connectors for circular pins

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by John Devereux, Nov 3, 2009.

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  1. Hi,

    I am looking for some specialised "Bottom entry" connectors suitable for
    circular pins.

    You can get "bottom entry" or "pass through" socket connectors that sit on top
    of your PCB, where the mating pins pass through holes in the board. So
    you have:

    ..
    .. X
    .. ||X|| Connector, SMT preferred
    .. ||X||
    ..==================X========== PCB
    .. X
    .. X
    .. X
    .. ===== Pin
    ..
    ..

    There are lots available for 0.1" and 2.0mm pitch square pin headers,
    designed for 0.025" or 0.5mm square pins.

    Does anyone know of anything like this suitable for four round pins?
    Ideally for a larger diameter than the 0.025". A wider pitch would be
    good too, or single pin types I can place where I want.

    Thanks,
     
  2. legg

    legg Guest

    Samtec FHP 0.187 pitch connectors have an SMT version. Alignment pins
    are a useful option.

    For multisourcing of smt, sticking with 0.1 pitch, double row might be
    advisable.

    You'd best use pins designed for the socket. Round is convenient for
    no-one but the mfr of the round pin.

    There are also bottom entry female 'faston' receptacles for .187
    blade-type pins that aren't very smt, but you're drilling holes
    anyway, so what the heck? Check out Zeirick 1118-6 / 6118-6.

    RL
     
  3. I was looking for some of those, couldn't remember where I had seen
    them!

    Thanks. (I would prefer to have an all-SMT solution but these look good
    too. Probably better anyway since I get flexibility in pin positioning).
     
  4. legg

    legg Guest

    Samtec FHP 0.187 pitch connectors have an SMT version. Alignment pins
    are a useful option.

    For multisourcing of smt, sticking with 0.1 pitch, double row might be
    advisable.

    You'd best use pins designed for the socket. Round is convenient for
    no-one but the mfr of the round pin.

    There are also bottom entry female 'faston' receptacles for .187
    blade-type pins that aren't very smt, but you're drilling holes
    anyway, so what the heck? Check out Zeirick 1118-6 / 6118-6.

    RL
     
  5. Thanks, I am trying to see if we really need the round pins. (It is for
    a special high pressure hermetically sealed feed-through connector).

    Currently I am leaning towards the type JL posted (not SMT) for single
    pins. All the SMT stuff seems to be for square pin headers.
     
  6. legg

    legg Guest

    By bottom entry, the OP means that he wants the pin to penetrate the
    board before entering the receptacle - and possibly passing through to
    meet other pass-through or end receptacles on succeeding assemblies.

    Tyco/Amp does pass-through pin sockets as illustrated, but the vast
    majority are sealed at one end. The sealed version can do bottom
    entry, even in wave-soldered assemblies, through insertion with the
    correct orientation (and with the open end plugged to prevent solder
    flow or gold contamination). Even the open-ended versions require this
    orientation and 'plugging'.

    There is always a prefered direction for pin insertion it seems, if
    only to slacken the tolerance on pin-socket registration, but quite
    frequently because insertion from other directions is mechanically
    impossible, due to the retention function and contact area compression
    features of the hardware's design. Watch for compatible connector
    contact metalization - gold may not be suitable for repeated
    insertions or higher power levels.

    RL
     
  7. That's right. It doesn't need to actually pass through to anything
    else. The point is to get near zero spacing under the PCB shown. In fact
    I can probably accept some small fraction of a mm protrusion on the
    underside, so those single pins type that push into a hole in the board
    would be possible.

    <http://www.harwin.com/include/downloads/drawings/H3183.PDF>

    If there was a rectangular SMT socket specified for round pins that
    might be less work to assemble.
     
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