Connect with us

Bootloading ATMEGA328P Question

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by bigone5500, Nov 2, 2014.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    121
    Apr 9, 2014
    I am going to attempt to bootload a 328P chip. If I do something wrong, do I risk bricking the chip or can it be done over again?
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,849
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yes. :D

    It is possible that:
    1. It will work, but incorrectly (say wrong clock frequency) and you just program it again.
    2. It won't work (wrong oscillator source perhaps) and you can just program it again
    3. It won't work (any of the above plus disabling low voltage programming) and you are then limited to high voltage programming
    (1) looks odd, (2) and (3) look bricked, but (2) is easily recovered. I don't have a high voltage programmer, so for me (3) is effectively unrecoverable.

    How are you programming the bootloader?
     
  3. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    121
    Apr 9, 2014
    I plan on using my UNO to program it. I have a working breadboarded 328P 'arduino'. But I am wondering if it would be best to put the new chip on the UNO's dip socket and program it that way.
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,849
    Jan 21, 2010
    I have no experience with the UNO, but if you're planning to use the ICSP demo project to program another arduino, be aware that you may have to override the reset signal that is applied via DTR (I think) from the serial device. This resets the programmING arduino and the software times out.

    After you fix that, it's pretty easy.

    Did you do the breadboarded arduino with or without a crystal?
     
  5. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    121
    Apr 9, 2014
    I used a 16mhz crystal.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,849
    Jan 21, 2010
    Aaah, OK. Using a chip on a breadboard without a crystal will expose you to many of the nuances of programming the chip. Since you may use custom firmware, you also expose yourself to dude bid and the possibility of bricking the chip.

    If you're using standard firmware then the risks of bad things happening is far lower.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-