Connect with us

bizarre

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by John Larkin, Sep 29, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. John Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    Well, the Harvard architecture, the 64-byte address space, the
    hardwired subroutines, and the single instruction, to start.

    John
     
  2. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

  3. john jardine

    john jardine Guest

  4. Jeroen

    Jeroen Guest

    Bizarre because it's optimized for a high(er) level language other then C?
     
  5. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    I'm still wondering what a "64-byte address space" is. Doesn't sound
    like a heck of a lot! ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  6. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    It's a proceesor that runs Forth as it's assembly language.
    Why would anyone want to store anything in a cruddy old address
    space when they have a modern efficient stack to store things on? :)
     
  7. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    ^

    You've got either an extraneous apostrophe here, or a missing
    comma: "It's a processor that runs Forth, as it is assembly language."
    Some guy tried to explain RPN to me one time - he says, "How do
    you do it on paper? You write down 3, then you write down 4, then
    you add." I tried patiently to explain to him. "I don't want to
    write them down. That's why I use the machine. I want to know what
    3 plus 4 equals. So I press 3, plus, 4, equals, and there's the
    answer." "But you don't write down 3, then add, then write down 4!"
    "No, I don't add at all. The machine does." "But - but - but ..."

    He just didn't get it. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  8. Al Borowski

    Al Borowski Guest

    One of my favourite examples (copied from an earlier post of mine) is

    Suppose you have 4,5 and 6 ohm resistors in parallel. In series with
    them you have a 7 ohm resistor. In parallel with *that* arrangement you
    have an 8 ohm resistor. Whats the equiv resistance?


    0----------------------------------
    | |
    | |
    .-. |
    | | |
    |7| |
    '-' |
    | |
    | .-.
    | | |
    -------|------- |8|
    | | | '-'
    .-. .-. .-. |
    | | | | | | |
    |4| |5| |6| |
    '-' '-' '-' |
    | | | |
    -------|------- |
    | |
    | |
    0-------------|-------------------|

    Of course, for the sake of the argument, the values are nice and even,
    and easy to work out without a calculator. This is a fairly simple
    circuit as well.


    Algebraic entry solution:

    1/( 1/8 + 1 / (7 + 1 / ( 1/4 + 1/5 + 1/6 ) ) ) =

    ~30 keystrokes, and a bit of a pain to keep the brackets matched.

    RPN solution (with comments, because its a PITA to read, but easy to
    enter IMO)

    # means the '1/X' key.

    first find the equiv resistance of the 4,5,6 ohm part.

    [ 4 # 5 # 6 # + + # ] (find the inverses of 4,5 and 6, adds them and
    inverts the resul)

    then add the 7 ohm resistor in series

    [ 7 + ]

    then place the 8 ohm resistor in parallel with the resistance so far

    [ # 8 # + #] (again, find the inverse of the answer so far, find the
    inverse of 8, add them, find the inverse of that)

    ~16 keystrokes

    This look terrible to read on a PC screen, but is shown graphically as
    you type it - you can follow the working easily if you do it on a
    graphics calc. After the first part the screen would show (1/
    (1/4+1/5+1/6) in textbook form for instance.

    cheers,

    Al
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-