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BGA packages

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Jon Slaughter, Jul 21, 2007.

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  1. This is probably a stupid question but is there any way for a "hobbyist" to
    use BGA's? If I were to etch a board, tin it, apply some flux, sit BGA IC on
    it, and put it in an oven, would I get brownies out? Just wondering if its
    possible to do as some of the things I'd like to use involve BGA's.

    Thanks,
    Jon
     
  2. Yes it's possible, some people have had success with using toaster
    ovens, like this:
    http://www.circuitcellar.com/renesas/winners/3323.htm

    Google "bga toaster oven"

    But the best advice is to simply steer clear of BGA for home use if at
    all possible.

    But if you want to try it yourself, spring for a proper solder masked
    PCB, they aren't expensive.

    Alternatively, get a tube of BGA chips, some BGA-to-throughole adapter
    boards and an assembler to put the BGA's on the boards for you.

    Dave.
     
  3. Leon

    Leon Guest


    I'm getting a small BGA mounted on a couple of prototype boards, it
    isn't a hobbyist project. My client is paying 300 GBP for the work,
    but that includes a stencil, assembly and X-ray. They have to use
    solder paste because the solder balls aren't uniform and some are non-
    spherical. If the balls are OK home assembly is feasible (no solder
    paste is required), but I wouldn't have risked it for this project.

    Leon
     

  4. Thanks, atleast I know its possible. I doubt I'll be able to use them
    because I can't do multi-level pcb's which kinda makes them useless. I might
    look into the adapators though.

    Jon
     
  5. Leon

    Leon Guest

    My board is double-sided, but the BGA is a Telit GSM/GPS module with
    only 84 balls, most of which are around the sides.

    Leon
     
  6. The ones I'm dealing with are 256 or something like that but most of the
    inner ones are for grounds. I'm sure its not all that difficult with enough
    time and experimenting but I'm going to try and avoid messing with it for
    now... atleast until I get more experienced with SMT.
     
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