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Best way to store C2016 batteries?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by daviddschool, Jun 7, 2008.

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  1. daviddschool

    daviddschool Guest

    I have about 40 C2016 batteries kicking around. I want to store them,
    but someone told me if they are touching each other in a bag they
    might lose the charge...what is the best method (besides selling them
    on Ebay to get rid of them!)
     
  2. Baron

    Baron Guest

    I keep my battery stock in plastic zip bags in the fridge. They will
    keep for years if kept cool.
     
  3. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    They will short out if there is a metallic path from one end of a
    battery to the other, which could be thru 6 other batteries if they
    happened to be arranged in such a manner that there is continuity.
    Put some masking tape over one of the two contacts and put them all in
    the refrigerator as the previous poster suggested.
     
  4. lurk

    lurk Guest

    I dunno know about the fridge thing but seems my devices that run on
    batteries the batteries don't hold up well in the cold weather...always
    carry cameras recorders in the jeep year round....just my thought


    They will short out if there is a metallic path from one end of a
    battery to the other, which could be thru 6 other batteries if they
    happened to be arranged in such a manner that there is continuity.
    Put some masking tape over one of the two contacts and put them all in
    the refrigerator as the previous poster suggested.
     
  5. Baron

    Baron Guest

    Well the idea was for long term storage of batteries ! As you have
    discovered the chemical reactions that produce the electricity slow
    right down in cold conditions. Hence storing them in the fridge.
     
  6. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    Keeping them in their original packaging
    (showing their expiration dates) would be the gold standard.
    This would be a *specific* kind of "touching" (aka "short circuit").
    If they are just loose to touch each other any way they might,
    there is no guarantee some won't align that way.

    To store them, get a tubular pill bottle
    that is just big enough for them to fit
    and stack them in the bottle.
    Fill any extra space (with packets of silica gel)
    so the cells don't change position.

    ....and putting masking tape on a battery would leave residue.
    I wouldn't do that.
    To dispose of chemical waste (e.g. batteries),
    put them aside until the next Toxics Roundup in your locale
    then find someone who has stuff and give them to him to take.
     
  7. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    they are lithium cells and don't need refrigeration for a long shelf life.
     
  8. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    It is, put a hygrometer in there sometime.
     
  9. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    every time you open the door,moist room air enters and condenses on the
    cold walls and items inside. that's why the freezer has to have a defrost
    cycle or be defrosted periodically,and there's a drip pan underneath the
    fridge.

    My folks used to yell at us kids for having the fridge door open too long.
     
  10. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    It condenses on the walls because the relative humidity is high. The
    total amount of moisture in the air is lower as the temperature drops,
    but relative humidity takes this into account.
     
  11. Sjouke Burry

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Its low. All the moisture is frozen to the boy of the
    freezer. Thats why you have to defrost them on occasion.
     
  12. Adrian C

    Adrian C Guest

    Someone remind me.

    What's the reaction between Lithium and Water?

    These are Lithium CR2016 cells? Wouldn't having one of them short out
    inside a wet refrigerator be the first step to buying a new house in a
    different town?
     
  13. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    To be fair, there isn't much lithium in on of those, it's not like it
    would blow up the refrigerator.

    Batteries are sealed anyway, unless the seal fails and they leak,
    moisture should not get in any more than electrolyte gets out.
     
  14. bz

    bz Guest

    Actually, both of you were right, in a way.
    The relative humidity in a refrigerator IS generally very high.
    But the absolute humidity in a refrigerator is generally very LOW.

    Relative humidity is the amount of water vapor in the air divided by the
    amount of water vapor the air CAN hold at that temperature when it is
    totally saturated with water vapor. Cold air holds less water vapor when
    saturated than warm air.

    Opening the door brings in air that contains more water vapor than the air
    in the refrigerator can hold (the dew point of the incoming air is above
    the temperature of the refrigerator) so water condenses on surfaces. Most
    of the water condenses on the coldest surface which is the evaporator coil
    of the refrigerator (the coil where the compressed freon evaporates,
    cooling the coil).

    As for batteries, I would expect that some kinds of batteries [Gel cells,
    for example] would lose moisture in a refrigerator. I would NOT expect
    sealed cells to lose moisture at a significant rate, when stored in the
    lower part of the refrigerator, where fruits and veggies are usually
    stored.


    --
    bz

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

     
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