Connect with us

Battery desulfator

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Ken G., Feb 23, 2007.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Ken G.

    Ken G. Guest

    I am looking into getting one of these to try to save several batterys
    that are new but were stored to long without a charge such as the ``jump
    start`` devices used to start cars and of coarse other used batterys .

    I have been searching on the net for one that simply plugs into 120
    volts for use inside . Most of them i see hook to 12 volts and stay in a
    vehicle . Some 120 volt ones cost 500$ . I am looking for one around
    100$ .

    What can anyone say about these .
     
  2. Try trickling about 50 volts at a max of 100mA through the battery for a
    few days.
     
  3. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    (Ken G.) wrote in 3235.bay.webtv.net:
    Vector makes battery charger/maintainers that desulfate batteries.
     
  4. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    So how is it supposed to work?
    I like to have a car battery around to blast dendrited ni-cads but they
    usually end up sulphated sitting around too much.
     
  5. In theory you can reverse the process by reversing what caused it. So a
    slow charge for a very long period *might* work. Trouble is most modern
    chargers don't allow a high enough voltage to produce meaningful current
    through the battery so you need a bench supply or purpose made job. Or an
    ancient totally unregulated type where the off load voltage is high.

    FWIW it's only worked once for me where a relatively new battery was
    knackered through leaving the car lights on for three weeks. ;-) A jump
    start got the car going, but the battery was still totally flat after the
    30 mile journey back from the airport. It took a week of high voltage
    before it would take any real current and start charging. It lasted for a
    few years after that.
     
  6. clifto

    clifto Guest

    http://www.shaka.com/~kalepa/desulfparts2.htm
     
  7. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    If you Google "desulfator" you will find circuits that can be built very
    inexpensively.You will also find references to how they work.
     
  8. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    A POX on the twits who post gif or other binaries along with their replies
    to threads on this NON-binary newsgroup.


    that would be YOU,Warren Weber. KNOCK IT OFF,CEASE,DESIST.
     
  9. Ken G.

    Ken G. Guest

    I read that website for a long time and got very confused at all the
    different stuff there .
    I would like to buy a desulfator already made that i can plug into the
    wall .
     
  10. But do these really work?

    I can only recall 1 or 2 replies with actual success stories, and at least 1 of
    those could have been a situation where the battery was caught just in time
    so that there was minimal sulfation.

    If I have a battery that's been sitting around discharged for a year, will
    anything help?

    Comments?

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Sites: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header above is
    ignored unless my full name AND either lasers or electronics is included in the
    subject line. Or, you can contact me via the Feedback Form in the FAQs.
     
  11. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    Exactly the same interest, if there is a viable answer. As far as i was
    aware nothing could remove the layer of insulating and insoluble lead
    (bi)sulpha(i)t(d)e? film other than mechanically scraping the plates
     
  12. Ken Weitzel

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Hi...

    I have no idea whether or not what I experienced was "sulphate" or not;
    but for what little it may be worth...

    Left a garden tractor with a snow blower attached and an almost new
    battery installed sit for two or three years untouched.

    When I finally got back to it it was dead, not a click.

    Found one of the battery posts (pos, I think) evenly and completely
    covered in a flat black "something". Looked like it had been painted.

    One of those round battery post wire brushes wouldn't even scratch it.

    Using a course file and tons of elbow grease removed it. Then a long
    charge at 10 amps or so gave me a few starts - but for practical
    purposes the battery was garbage.

    IF that black stuff was indeed sulphate, I can't see anything touching
    it.

    Take care.

    Ken
     
  13. Back when the only thing I knew about chargers/batteries was polarity had to
    be observed I bought a cheap 1 amp trickle charger cause it was all I could
    afford. IIRC it put out 18volts under light/no load. I "brought back" a
    couple of batteries with it by leaving it on for a couple of days. I got
    several more months of use from the batteries in warm weather but they still
    didn't have enough capacity for cold starting and had to be replaced then.

    I've never really looked at the units in question but my experience says
    theirs probably some merit to them. Question is, do you want to put that
    kind of money into something that's going to give batteries of suspect
    usefulness. I have batteries because I want to use them when needed, not
    screw around with them. I think most people would be better off buying
    quality batteries and learning to take care of them. Lead acid batteries
    self-discharge ~1%/day. I'd never mess with a battery that had gone below
    10.5volts.

    I have a MC with a 9 year old battery in it. Manually charged it in the off
    season the first 5 years and have been using a Battery Tender the last 4.
    The BT makes the chore much easier. IMHO it makes a lot more sense to keep a
    battery healthy than to resurrect a dead one. YMMV
     
  14. jonpi

    jonpi Guest

    i once tried using baking soda to "clean" the plates...emptied
    electrolyte, used baking soda, rinsed alot, refilled with
    electrolyte...it didn't really work...it was a motorcycle battery...i was 15

    i now think of the plates as more high tech, only the amount of lead
    necessary...not like they are solid lead that the surface can be
    cleaned...imho
     
  15. Some guys spray paint them to prevent corrosion. Others use grease or felt
    washers soaked in grease.


    --
    ..

    --
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..

    --
     
  16. JANA

    JANA Guest

    I know of few people who used a desulfator. It did the job, but only for a
    short while. We think the plates inside the batteries took on some permanent
    damage.

    In the end, when we calculated the loss of time, the cost of the device to
    do the desulfacation, and considering the potential unreliability of the
    batteries, we came to the conclusion, it is better to buy new batteries,
    maintain them, and they should last at least 3 to 5 years.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    I am looking into getting one of these to try to save several batterys
    that are new but were stored to long without a charge such as the ``jump
    start`` devices used to start cars and of coarse other used batterys .

    I have been searching on the net for one that simply plugs into 120
    volts for use inside . Most of them i see hook to 12 volts and stay in a
    vehicle . Some 120 volt ones cost 500$ . I am looking for one around
    100$ .

    What can anyone say about these .
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-