Connect with us

Balun - Lumped Component

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by sthim, Aug 22, 2003.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. sthim

    sthim Guest

    I had posted some questions on baluns earlier. Thank you very much
    for all then information. I should have been more specific. I have
    done some more reading, and the baluns I'm talking uses lumped
    components - the Lumped-constant 180 degrees splitter. I found it on
    the IEEE site in a paper by Tetsuo Hirota and Masahiro Muraguchi. I
    was wondering how the signals get split by 180 degrees, equations etc.

    sthim
     
  2. Mantra

    Mantra Guest

    Transformers are the easiest way to get 180 splits. But you can't
    always use a transformer. Generally 180 splitting is only occurring
    over a range of frequencies with lumped components. At a single freq
    a single lumped capacitor or inductor can give you 90 degrees of shift
    between voltage and current. Together you can create 180, but only at
    one frequency aka a resonance. Expanding the number and spacing
    resonant frequencies gives a broaden response and range of *nearly*
    180 splitting. A perfectly distributed (non-lumped) implementation
    can give the best implementation because you can create
    transformer-like circuit without strictly using a transformer as they
    are familiarly known - the limit is that there is a (low end) cut-off
    frequency.

    You'd need to look at the particular paper (most likely it focuses on
    economizing lumped component counts, which in quantity look
    distributed, against bandwidth of splitting given a desired error
    level with (fanatically) not using a wire-wound transformer), or look
    into filter design techniques, especially all-pass filters and
    impedance design. Since a balun is about matching impedances, and
    filters have input and output impedances, then one way to think of
    impedance matching circuits is as filter design problem. There isn't
    a simple or single equation for filter design but if you look at
    filter design you'll find the answer.


    MM
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-