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AV transmitter noise

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by circuitbend, Jan 6, 2015.

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  1. circuitbend

    circuitbend

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    Jan 6, 2015
    I'm using a cheap audio video transmitter to transmit a signal for recording on a computer (http://www.amazon.com/HOSSEN®-2-4ghz-Wireless-Transmitter-Receiver/dp/B0094O3A4G). After transmission a lot of noise is present in the signal. Attached is an image of a rough fourier transform comparison in audacity, the bottom is the signal probed BEFORE transmission while the top is the signal AFTER transmission.

    Do FM transmitters typically introduce this much noise? Has anyone else encountered issues like this before, and is there any way to reduce distortion? This is for an electrophysiology project, so both audio channels are very weakly amplified bioelectric signals that get lost after transmission. My guess is that the noise wouldn't be a major issue if the signal was stronger.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 6, 2015
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,947
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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there

    what range are you using them over ?

    An A/V transceiver system isn't really a good approach for what you are wanting to do
    yeah its noise figure is going to be crap for doing low level signals like you are dealing with

    You should really be converting your analog bio signal to a digital one and then using a better
    single mode transceiver system

    Dave
     
  3. circuitbend

    circuitbend

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    Jan 6, 2015
    Ultimately it won't be transmitting very far, no more than 10-15 feet, but for testing the equipment I've been placing the transmitter next to the receiver.

    I'll look into converting to digital. In the meantime, do you think increasing the amplification of the signal would help combat the noise?
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    1,987
    Sep 5, 2009
    no, not likely as the noise isn't in the transmission path, rather its an inherent property of the design of the transmitter and receiver
     
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