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Auton: The autonomous sailing boat

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by nabberuk, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. nabberuk

    nabberuk

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    Jul 25, 2012
    Hello,

    We're in the process of designing an autonomous sailing boat that will attempt to be the first to sail across the Atlantic sea autonomously.

    The planning stages of the project have already begun, but we're looking for some more team members in the electronic's/programming field.

    If you'd like to join or read more about the project then please free to join us at autonboat.com

    Hope you guys at Electronics Point don't mind me posting this here!

    Nathan
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,174
    2,690
    Jan 21, 2010
    Batteries in the keel sounds good. If your batteries don't weigh enough it would be a good place to put some D sized sealed lead acid cells.

    I don't like the idea of those solar cells being exposed to the elements. You're going to have to find a way to seal them. At the very least it will stop the wires corroding through.

    You also need to take into account the effect of shading your panels. You're best off having one set on the starboard side and another set on the port side. That will give you the best chance of avoiding problems with partially shaded cells. (A trimaran design might also be effective in giving you more deck area for the panels.)
     
  3. nabberuk

    nabberuk

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    Jul 25, 2012
    the cells will be housed in silicone encapsulation with all cables going through the deck so shouldnt have a problem with them. I plan to have the cells on both sides and the front. I wish there was some lightweight flexible solar cells as the sail would be an idea place to put them.

    I have been looking at the larger 25ah of those batteries, I had a couple of questions. Are they ok on their side? I understand there not sealed lead acid, does this mean they would give off gasses? This could be pretty bad as everything be sealed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  4. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    How big is the boat going to be?

    The larger it gets the more options you have, especially in batteries...

    I also suggest having a small windmill on there, as it doesn't take much to generate enough electricity to subsidize basic navigation equipment shut down to a sleep mode, during the long dark or cloudy times... And if the boat is big enough even a small fossil fuel engine that can be switched on in dire need to charge the batteries...
     
  5. nabberuk

    nabberuk

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    Jul 25, 2012
    The hull will either be 1.5 or 2 metres long.

    I was thinking of making use of electromagnetic induction with the rocking of the boat but unsure on how much it will generate.
     
  6. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    That's a small boat for a trans ocean voyage, it's going to have to be rock solid if it encounters any bad weather or larger waves...
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,174
    2,690
    Jan 21, 2010
    Or simply be able to survive being flattened and capsized over and over again. All good reasons to have a single hull design because something with multiple hulls is likely to be stable when inverted.

    To some extent, smaller is better because the loads on various parts will be easier to manage.
     
  8. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    Trans-Ocean Voyage, There is no if. :D
     
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