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Attach Wires to NMH Batteries Without Soldering

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Dec 20, 2012.

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  1. Guest

    Hi,
    Do you know a technique to safely attach wires to NMH batteries
    ("C" cells) without soldering the wires to the battery which may harm the
    batteries integrity? Note: I have several new "C" NMH batteries.

    I know about battery holders, but there isn't enough space for a
    multi-cell battery holder in the project I am working on.

    Thank You in advance, John
     
  2. Welding.

    A Batteries Plus store will do it for a small charge -- or sometimes free if
    you buy enough stuff. The store near Southcenter fixed the broken weld in my
    B&D battery pack.
     
  3. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest


    Whats wrong with soldereing? Seriously roughen the metal with coarse sand
    paper then a blob of flux. Then a soldering iron greater than 50W and
    locally heat enough to get a spot of solder wetted over the roughened area,
    don't dally and heat the whole cell. Then at your leisure and ordinary iron
    locally melt a bit of your solder blob and meld with some new solder and the
    wire. If its for >5 or 10A use then probably not advisable

    practise on an old cell first , perhaps
     
  4. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    Do what Mr. Cook suggests, it is what I frequently do.
     
  5. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest

    Do what Mr. Cook suggests, it is what I frequently do.

    +++

    I must have done it a few dozen times , admittedly NiCads, but no in
    service problems emerged over time scale of a few years anyway.
     
  6. Ian Malcolm

    Ian Malcolm Guest

    Me too. The worry is: that you might melt some plastic internal seperator
    or similar. NiMH batteries can be stored at -20 deg C so you can put the
    cells in the freezer beforehand to give yourself a bit more safety margin,
    but if you are any good at soldering that really isn't required. Whatever
    you do, don't piss about with a low wattage iron or a fine tip. This is a
    perfect job for a 100W Weller soldering gun or a catalytic butane gas iron.

    I usually roughen up the contact with a fiberglass brush pencil. Its
    absolutely essential to break through any Nickel plating that may be there.

    This is safe enough for NiCd/NiMH but *NOT* reccomended for LiPO cells as
    you risk turning them into an incendary devicee. [;)]
     
  7. Bob E.

    Bob E. Guest

    Do what Mr. Cook suggests, it is what I frequently do.

    I second this. I've done this several times with "non-replaceable" cells in
    shavers, etc. and have had no failures related to quick-soldering, only the
    usual slow degradation over time of the cell chemistry.

    Tin the wire, emery-paper the terminals, clean, drop of flux, quick solder.
     
  8. mike

    mike Guest

    Soldering directly to cells is a bad idea.
    It's like driving above the speed limit. You won't have any problem finding
    people who'll swear that they do it all the time. They never get caught...
    until they do.
    Go down to traffic court and you'll see the other side of the coin.

    I've soldered a lot of NiCd's back in the day. It mostly worked.
    Except for the few that exploded under charge. And the few that
    had high self-discharge rates.

    And if you're fixing a laptop battery pack, there really isn't room
    for that solder joint.

    You need to find the sweet spot of time and temperature.
    I found that spot with a DIY battery tab welder.
    Haven't had any battery problems since.

    If you insist on soldering batteries, wear safety glasses.
    Clamp them down so they
    won't hit you in the face when they explode. Also helps to
    have them in a fixed position. You don't have time to fiddle
    with the cells and the wire and the solder and the iron
    with only two hands. The separator melts before you get
    it all lined up.

    Did I mention that soldering directly to cells is a bad idea.
     
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Also, use fairly small wire for the attachment and put a tiny blob
    of solder on the wire to be attached... Then a quick touch with
    the iron will melt both blobs together. The secret is minimum heat
    and time, but it is easy to do...... and be sure to use the
    emery paper on the batt terminals first....
     
  10. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest


    ** The industry standard method is a special form of spot welding using two,
    close spaced electrodes.

    You can get NiMH cells with welded, metal tags already attached - and solder
    these.

    Otherwise use ordinary soldering - like thousands do.

    For battery packs subjected to high discharge rates, soldering produces
    reliable, low resistance connections and spot welding does not.


    ..... Phil
     
  11. You can get NiMH cells with welded, metal tags already
    But they're still welded -- which you condemn for high-drain apps:

    "For battery packs subjected to high discharge rates, soldering produces
    reliable, low resistance connections and spot welding does not."
     
  12. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker = Utter Fuckwit"

    ** Your bullshit words - not mine arsehole.


    BTW:

    Got any idea what is the OP's app is ??

    Got any idea why you fat head is permanently stuck up your arse ??

    Rhetorical question -

    everyone already knows the answer to that, except you.

    You stupid pile a ASD fucked shit.
     
  13. Guest

    No Phil, they were YOUR words from YOUR previous post dated December
    20 at 7:41 PM

    "For battery packs subjected to high discharge rates, soldering
    produces
    reliable, low resistance connections and spot welding does not.

    ..... Phil"

    Look in the mirror when calling names because they apply to you as
    well.

    Merry Christmas

     
  14. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest


    No Phil, they were YOUR words ...


    ** Anyone alive can see they were not.

    " For battery packs subjected to high discharge rates, soldering
    produces reliable, low resistance connections and spot welding does not."


    ** Different words & with a different meaning.

    Now go **** your mother, you pile of putrid trolling garbage.
     
  15. "For battery packs subjected to high discharge rates, soldering
    produces reliable, low resistance connections and spot welding does not."

    ** Different words & with a different meaning.

    Ya coulda fooled me.

    "When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means
    just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less."

    "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many
    different things."

    "The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master — that's all."
     
  16. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker = TROLL "

    ** Anyone could fool a tenth witted, ASD fucked **** like you.
     
  17. "Michael A. Terrell" wrote in message
    I know you're speaking to Phil, but I worked on the American space program in
    Australia, installing and tuning a new klystron at the Orroral Valley site.

    With respect to the American space programl... While working for RCA, I nearly
    destroyed one of the TIROS satellites. I don't remember whether it was 6 or
    7...
     
  18. I know you're speaking to Phil, but I worked on the American space program
    I believe the maximum output was 20kW. They were built by Varian whose chief
    engineer was one Mr Goldfinger. Really. He gave me the clue I needed to figure
    out why we couldn't tune the klystrons.
     
  19. gregz

    gregz Guest

    Some guys could fiddle with those forever. I thought it was 10kw but might
    be wrong.

    Greg
     
  20. "Jon Elson" wrote in message
    Both satellites used dual, identical computers, with one backing up the other.
    The software was periodically modified or updated, and I was assigned to write
    the step-by-step instructions for a change.

    Although my work was checked by other people, they made the same mistake I
    did. I assumed that, because one of the satellites did not perform a checksum
    on that section of program memory, neither did the other one. But it did.

    The result was that, shortly after the update, the checksum was performed,
    wasn't correct, and the computer shut down. For reasons I never understood,
    the backup computer also shut down. (This was an intentional part of the
    design.)

    I quickly figured out what was going on, and my boss complimented me (which he
    shouldn't have -- he should have chewed me out). No one was fired, or even
    reprimanded. I suspect this sort of mistake was not uncommon.

    The satellite was "fixed" by sending commands to reload and restart the
    computers.
     
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