Connect with us

Arduino based frequency counter design

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by mrguen, Oct 9, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Scroll to continue with content
  1. mrguen

    mrguen

    3
    0
    Oct 9, 2017
    Hi,

    I have been working on an Arduino based frequency counter for a while. It is working well but I probably have to improve the design. In fact I designed it for myself as a hobby, then I thought about industrializing it. Here is the project log

    If you are interested by this project, would you give me your opinion about the design specifications by filling out this survey?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2017
  2. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,275
    1,147
    Jun 25, 2010
    4MHz isn't a VHF frequency.......
     
  3. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
    665
    Jun 20, 2015
    Yes Kelly, merely HF;)
     
  4. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,275
    1,147
    Jun 25, 2010
    TBH there are already a number of frequency counters available that do the same job but with less component count and lower cost.

    Undoubtedly cheaper too.

    Not to distract from the design - I appreciate the work put into it - but you're kind of re-inventing the wheel.....
     
  5. mrguen

    mrguen

    3
    0
    Oct 9, 2017
    Hello,

    Thanks for your replying to this post and showing interest, all the more that it is from enlightened people

    The picture is just an illustration of a measurement @4Mhz. The upper frequency is above 70 Mhz and I hope to reach 100 Mhz.

    Yes, the circuit is relatively complex as compared to simpler frequency counters. The reason is obvious: simple frequency counters don't offer a proper isolation of the circuit. Often they don't even have high input impedance, for example when the signal is fed to a single transistor. The other reason for a simpler architecture is that they don't offer what Arduino offers: the possibility to program the board, to connect I2C peripherals, to use SPI etc... if they have any connector at all.

    If you would like more information on the actual design, that will be enhanced depending on the results of the survey, you can check

    And of course your welcome to participate in the survey.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2017
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,480
    2,826
    Jan 21, 2010
    Your use of abbreviations to designate ranges needs some serious thought.

    These abbreviations mean things already, using them for something else makes you look... well, it's not wise.
     
  7. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,275
    1,147
    Jun 25, 2010
    Again, I seem to be 'raining on your parade' but there are many, many solutions available already:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/0-1-60MHz...d=251815730875&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

    allegedly good to 2.4GHz although, since I actually have one, I've only tested it to 150MHz and it's accurate to better than 10Hz - [disclaimer - I don't have the accurate test equipment to 'prove' this but have also seen Youtube videos of people testing them to confirm their accuracy]. The claimed 60mV input sensitivity is correct and, if it was an issue at all, a simple buffer input could fix that in a trice.

    LCD???

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/RF-1-to-5...452975&hash=item4af9d382e8:g:4OIAAOSwa39UyN5S

    good for a claimed 500MHz.

    why would anyone want to? It's a DFM. Built (or bought) as one and presumably USED as one so why would anyone want to program or change its function?

    I understand your own personal pride at the completion of a 'complicated' circuit and in a professional manner but other than a demonstration of your abilities (very impressive) it has no other practical use to others - that hasn't already been done before and for a LOT less time, trouble and expense.

    Thanks for showing us your project though - as mentioned, you have considerable design and construction skills that could be useful to prospective employers (perhaps that was your aim?) but you've still, IMHO, just re-invented the wheel - but not 'improved' on the wheel.
     
  8. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,275
    1,147
    Jun 25, 2010
    What survey???? No link.......
     
  9. mrguen

    mrguen

    3
    0
    Oct 9, 2017
    Here is the survey link https://kwiksurveys.com/s/pF3sHUzz#/0

    Indeed there exists many frequency counters on the market and you can buy very cheap products from China. I believe the global market of frequency counters is around 10 billion dollars, sot there surely are any kind of products, for all the needs.

    The first one you mentionned is a VHF counter. I doubt you can measure a GHz signal with a not properly isolated case and without any proper connector, but anyway I have no mean to check its good operation and accuracy.

    I haven't tested the second one but I tested another very commonly found on ebay and burned it after one week of use. From what I have tried, I very much doubt a 20$ frequency counter is accurate up to 500 Mhz.

    Anyway thanks for your feedback, I have had exactly the same answer, word for word from somebody who was not scottish, but a teacher at the MIT! (USA) He gave me the same ebay link for the same product as yours. Must be pretty good and I must admit at 10 pounds, such a bargain
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2017
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,480
    2,826
    Jan 21, 2010
    This is just advertising for a crowd funded campaign. I'm closing the thread.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-