Connect with us

Arduino and 32A 600V Transistor

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by fatman57, Oct 6, 2013.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. fatman57

    fatman57

    108
    0
    May 27, 2013
    Hi all,

    The guy who sold me some DC transistors said they would be fine to use with an Arduino. Having recently been exposed to the guaranteed isolation provided by SSR's I worry that if this transistor was used or exposed to anything near what it is capable of and things go wrong it could blow the Arduino.

    I was thinking of adding a fuse, but am unsure if this would be a correct solution to the problem. The max voltage the transistor can use is 600, and the Arduino uses 5v for its pins. The Arduino max amps is 40ma, and the transistor can sustain 32A.

    Can I use an SSR for DC applications? They all seem to contain TRIACS and I am unsure if this is suitable. Is it all ok without the fuse?

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Dan
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,390
    2,774
    Jan 21, 2010
    That's true. But it's also why you select transistors (or generally any component) so that it's suitable for the task.

    A fuse wouldn't protect the arduino. A fuse is mostly to prevent a fire.

    Also note that your car might be rated to a maximum speed of 180 km/h, a max load of 1250 kg, and be able to achieve a fuel economy of 6l/100km. but it can't do all of them at once. There's more to specs than the headline features.

    SSRs that contain mosfets will generally work on AC or DC. An SSR using a trial will turn on for a DC load, but not turn off. An SSR that features "zero crossing" will not work at all for DC.

    Maybe. If you're connecting up to a high energy power source (lead acid battery or mains are two examples) then you would normally use a fuse for safety. However it protects your house (and maybe the SSR) but not any delicate electronics.
     
  3. fatman57

    fatman57

    108
    0
    May 27, 2013
    Thanks steve.

    In your 4th reply you use the word 'trial' - do you mean triac?

    Bottom line is would the Arduino need protection if the transistor was dealing with 32A @ 600V? If so what could anyone recommend?
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,390
    2,774
    Jan 21, 2010
    Tes. Please fogive my poor typing skills. <-- It's late and my typing is getting worse. Tome for bed.

    Aaagh. YES, you were right, Triac. :)
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-