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Any US source for inexpensive germanium transistors?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by default, May 15, 2007.

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  1. default

    default Guest

    I wanted to try an idea appearing in Electronic Design (May 10 07)
    calling for an NTE 103 (TO5 NPN Ge)

    They claim a DC/DC converter that will unconditionally start
    oscillating at ~260 millivolts.

    It is a basic Eccles/Jordan flip flop with inductors in place of load
    resistors for voltage boost. They take output from both sides of the
    flip flop for higher current and low ripple. They also give a
    suggestion for using a JFET to turn it off (providing you have the
    voltage to do it).

    Most of what I see for prices are in the $5-7 each for germanium
    transistors and the basic oscillator takes a pair of them - which
    prices them out for the numbers I was thinking.

    NPN Ic of 100 ma to 500 ma, gain of ~100, 30 volt standoff would work.

    PNP would also work but somewhat less desirable.
     
  2. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    http://business.search.ebay.co.uk/g...ustrial_W0QQcatrefZC12QQfromZR40QQsacatZ12576

    http://business.search.ebay.com/germanium_Business-Industrial_W0QQcatrefZC12QQfromZR40QQsacatZ12576

    Graham
     
  3. Search [germanium] on eBay.
     
  4. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    Or you could go to even lower voltages, by going back to
    Model A-style spark coils (yes, a mechanical buzzer... a.k.a.
    a vibrator).

    It would be more interesting if there were some kind of
    power supply that was useful at 260 millivolts. Solar cells
    is the only candidate for that role, and you can series-connect
    a dozen of 'em easier than this workaround.
     
  5. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Well, you would be hard pressed to find NPN Germanium transistors,
    period.
    The few sources i have seen do not quote quantity prices, mainly most
    buyers seem to be hobbiests.
     
  6. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest


    Hobby, hobbier, hobbiest?

    It's HOBBYIST!!!!

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  7. Keep in mind that it has appeared to me that for germanium PNP is what
    is/was more common and available over a wider range of specifications. I
    am aware that NPN is more common and being the one exclusively available
    for some ratings for silicon.

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  8. LVMarc

    LVMarc Guest


    I have many ge transistrs contact me and we'll figure out a part number
    and ship

    Marc
     
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