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An amazing AC unit

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by Vaughn Simon, Jun 19, 2008.

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  1. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    Haier has hit the market with an amazing little window AC unit. It is 6000 BTU
    (good for a small room) but draws less than 500 watts. The advertised EER is
    12. I just measured mine with a KAW. While nicely cooling the room that I am
    sitting in right now, it is drawing 438 Watts, 3.66 Amp at .97 PF. I can't
    verify that it is really moving 6000 BTUs, but it quickly cools my study on the
    hottest south Florida weather we have had so far this year.

    To be fair, it is a high-end product and costs double what you would pay for a
    less efficient model. Depending on the hours you use it and what you pay for
    power, it may never pay for itself. On the other hand, if you are off-grid
    perhaps now you can afford to be cool. It is considerably larger and heavier
    than comparable models, but I had no problem installing it myself. For you
    earth huggers, it has the newest, greenest, refrigerant (R-410A) .

    Our plan is to use the study as a cool room in the dog days of summer and leave
    our central AC off for most of the day. We have been doing the same in our
    bedroom at night for years now. Now that we are retired folks (well, actually
    my last day at work is next week) we have to figure out how to live on the
    cheap! There is no reason to cool this entire uninsulated 3/2 house just for us
    two empty-nesters.

    http://www.haieramerica.com/en/product/ESAD4066

    Vaughn
     
  2. Sounds about right. The nameplate amperage/wattage draw is based
    on the mumble mumble mumble spec, which has some specified
    pretty high outdoor temperature. If the gradient between the
    outside and the inside is lower, then the current draw will
    be less as well,

    (hmmm, EER of 12, 6,000 BTU -> 500 watts. SO 438 makes sense).

    Oh, that 500 watts is also based on the higher fan speed,
    so if you've cut that down, you're also drawing less.

    (I had a GE SuperThrust 10,000 BTU unit 3 decades
    ago with an EER of 11.something.)
    One important concern is the starting current draw...
     
  3. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    True, I did not measure it at the hottest part of the day. I expect that it
    will be closer to the rated 500 watts in 90+ weather.
    The quoted power (438 Watts) was using high fan speed. Fan speed makes
    surprisingly little difference in measured power. That seemed so counter to
    what I expected, I rechecked in the fan-only mode. Only a few watts difference
    beween speeds.
    Yes, there is probably no deal-changing new technology here, just larger
    coils and a compresser & fan well matched to the job. That said, I have never
    before seen a small room unit with this kind of efficiency.
    ...which is something I have no way of measuring, except to tell you it
    passes the "light flicker' test. That is, my room lights don't flicker when the
    compresser comes on. I can't say the same about my bedroom unit. My house has
    #14 wire, so voltage drop is occasionally something that you can actually see.

    Vaughn
     
  4. | Haier has hit the market with an amazing little window AC unit. It is 6000 BTU
    | (good for a small room) but draws less than 500 watts. The advertised EER is
    | 12. I just measured mine with a KAW. While nicely cooling the room that I am
    | sitting in right now, it is drawing 438 Watts, 3.66 Amp at .97 PF. I can't
    | verify that it is really moving 6000 BTUs, but it quickly cools my study on the
    | hottest south Florida weather we have had so far this year.
    |
    | To be fair, it is a high-end product and costs double what you would pay for a
    | less efficient model. Depending on the hours you use it and what you pay for
    | power, it may never pay for itself. On the other hand, if you are off-grid
    | perhaps now you can afford to be cool. It is considerably larger and heavier
    | than comparable models, but I had no problem installing it myself. For you
    | earth huggers, it has the newest, greenest, refrigerant (R-410A) .
    |
    | Our plan is to use the study as a cool room in the dog days of summer and leave
    | our central AC off for most of the day. We have been doing the same in our
    | bedroom at night for years now. Now that we are retired folks (well, actually
    | my last day at work is next week) we have to figure out how to live on the
    | cheap! There is no reason to cool this entire uninsulated 3/2 house just for us
    | two empty-nesters.
    |
    | http://www.haieramerica.com/en/product/ESAD4066
    |
    | Vaughn
    |
    | --
    | Will poofread for food.
    |
    |
    |
    |

    Quick update the wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R-410A

    R-410A operates at a higher pressure tha R-22, thus the larger footprint. Hopefully the system was designed properly, and
    will last for some time.

    Cheers
     
  5. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    But that unit is designed to supply chilled air, not water. Any conversion
    you make would probably be an inefficient compromise. Probably better to start
    with the guts from a water cooler.

    Vaughn
     
  6. Guest

    Where did you purchase yours above?
     
  7. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    www.ffemax.com I paid 243.99 with free shipping. They beat everyone else by
    $50.00 based on delivered price.

    Vaughn
     
  8. daestrom

    daestrom Guest

    That's true. But the average run-time or duty-cycle of such a unit is more
    about how much heat gain the room has. Since he's using it in just one
    room, air leakage through the door to the rest of the house is probably
    pretty bad. And of course there is the 'heat load' of people, computers,
    lighting, whatever. And lastly the solar gain from any windows that are
    unfortunate enough to let in sunshine.
    You're right to think about the humidity aspect. If the room was ventilated
    during the day such that its humidity matches the outside air, that could be
    a significant burden to cooling the room at night. It might be better to
    let the room warm up but *not* open any windows during the day (depending on
    just how warm it gets in eight hours).

    daestrom
     
  9. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    NO. 6000 BTU/h
    I LOVE the mix of units !

    Graham
     
  10. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    6000 BTU/hr = 1758W

    1758/500 = ~3.5 as might be expected from such a device.

    So, it a straight LIE then. Report them to the FTC or whoever.

    Of course, but for the mix between Imperial and metric units, such lies would be
    more obvious.

    Graham
     
  11. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    In that case it's a totally stupid measure since it mixes Imperial and metric units.
    'Only in the USA' could these things happen. It gives a totally false concept of real
    efficiency. Not allowed in the rest of the world.

    The sooner you drop BTUs the better.

    Graham
     
  12. Mike Manuka

    Mike Manuka Guest

    You can buy an LG inverter unit with better specs with R410A.
    LG is now the largest air con manufacturer in the world.
    Only trouble is LG stopped making the smaller units and 10,000BTU is now the
    smallest.
    There is some talk due to demand they will bring back the 7,000BTU inverter
    unit.
     
  13. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    I wish !

    Most (by far the bulk) of the ROTW is 220-240V 50Hz.

    Miaow ! ;~) Ought to be USTU now.

    Graham
     
  14. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    ...which would give it an EER of 10, not bad in today's market for that size
    unit. Depending on your cost per KWh, the cheaper unit is probably the better
    deal for you.

    I make no bones about it; this is a case where I bought the more expensive unit
    because I wanted it, not because it made the most economic sense. That said, my
    12 EER Haier might be a very interesting unit for campers or off-griders. I
    haven't tried, but this unit would probably start and run from an EU1000 or the
    Yamaha equivalent, squeezing several hours of comfort from a single gallon of
    gas.

    Vaughn
     
  15. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    So I am responding to a solar powered post? Cool!
    Not an option for me. The wife has a lung problem and so needs oxygen at
    anything over 2000 feet or so. Our retirement haven will need to be at sea
    level.
    So I should be able to start and run my 8500 BTU bedroom unit off my EU2000?
    I have never tried it, but It would be good to know that is an option after the
    next hurricane.
    You and I are thinking alike. You only need to air condition the room that
    you are in, not your whole house.

    The motorhome life sounds pretty good, but I just like to own more "stuff"
    than you can get into one of them. Also, one must learn to be neat. Not a bad
    retirement option though. I hear that there is at least one motor home assisted
    living facility for the geriatric crowd, so there is even an "end game".

    Vaughn
     
  16. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    That's what I have for the few weeks when the solar gain in my 'office' (2 large
    windows) makes it otherwise unbearable if we have an 'Indian summer' here in the
    UK.

    8000 BTU/h IIRC in fact. About 3 kW ? of cooling. Never did understand those BTUs
    even when I used feet and inches. Got it for a snip (equiv to $200) on ebay.

    Graham
     
  17. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Reminds me of my trips to Bombay ! Had to have it on full blast all night plus
    those big overhead fans (recall the beginning of Apocalyspe Now ?) It was like a
    mini-apartment rather than just a hotel room you see.

    Graham
     
  18. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    I did, and I am sorry. The one I bought is actually sitting in the room with
    me right next to my new Haier window unit. Portables are a big compromise.
    First they take up a big footprint inside your room. Since all of the machinery
    is inside the room with you, they are loud. Worst, unless you live in a dry
    climate, you MUST buy a 2-hose unit...but nobody tells you that and 2-hose units
    are hard to find.

    Mine is a single hose unit. That single hose pumps hot air out of the room,
    which logically must be replaced by hot, humid, air from somewhere outside of my
    house. The result is low efficiency as the unit tries to dehumidify that air
    that it has drawn from outside and low comfort because the unit can't possibly
    dehumidify worth a crap. As a result, the unit would slowly cool my bedroom,
    but you would still not ever feel comfortable.

    The KAW also proved that the unit, advertised as high efficiency, was not
    doing as well as the old standard-efficiency window unit that it replaced. The
    end was when the unit (advertised to virtually never fill up with condensate)
    started waking us up with a loud beep at about 3 AM and then shutting down
    because it was full of water.

    Portables do not work in Florida. Perhaps Arizona, but not Florida.

    Vaughn
     
  19. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    Do a Google search on this group to find a couple threads I started on the
    Yamaha EF1000is (back in 2006). It is a little 1000 watt inverter generator
    that ran a modest sized fridge for 14 hours on .66 gallons of gas. That is
    squeezing a gallon of gas until it squeaks! It is spendy, but cheaper than the
    Honda competition. I have also seen a few Chinese clones, but have never ran
    across any reviews of them.

    Vaughn
     
  20. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    Like I said, it is spendy. That said, in the correct application it could
    pay for itself in a few months ( compared to...say a 1 gallon per hour screamer
    from the big box store). Getting reasonable fuel economy from a generator is
    all about matching the characteristics of the generator to the characteristics
    of the load.

    Where I used to work we had two of them sitting on the shelf, which is why I
    had them available to test. We bought them precisely because they are perfect
    for running a communications closet in a pinch. The damn things are built like
    fine clockwork. They are amazingly quiet, and thrifty on fuel.

    I own an EU2000 myself. That is a little 2000-watt Honda inverter generator
    that costs about a grand. I purchased it for use after the next hurricane.
    (meaning, I hope, NEVER!) Our main generator is a 4000 watt Onan that runs on
    natural gas, but the Honda is there because it is far more efficient at running
    light and variable loads, and also because my Onan has not made it through a
    long hurricane outage yet without ultimately failing us.

    Vaughn
     
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