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Alternative to Flywheels

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by Danno, Mar 4, 2007.

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  1. Danno

    Danno Guest

    Thanks for the reponses to the previous post on flywheels. Clearly,
    one of the prime issues is cost. The problems asociated with the high
    performance nature of flywheels also appear to be a significant
    drawback.
    Anthony Matonak commented on using a very large device housed in an
    outbuilding, got me thinking in larger scales, thought I'd float this
    idea :
    Instead of a large spinning flywheel, how about a large dead weight
    on a vertical guide with a heavy chain secured to the top. The chain
    leads to a set of reduction gears, which lead to a generator/motor.
    When your system is generating excess power, the motor spins and slowly
    pulls the dead weight up. When you need power, the weight drops, spinning
    the generator.
    Guess while I'm in this vein, I should inquire if there are other
    forms of kinetic / potential energy storage in use (other than water)?
     
  2. Vaughn Simon

    Vaughn Simon Guest

    So now you are storing energy in the form of potential energy rather than
    kinetic energy. Before you go any farther, do the math and figure out how high
    you would have to raise "X" weight to store one kilowatt/hour of energy.

    Google is your friend for units conversions, but to get you started:

    1 Ft/# = .0013 BTU and

    1 KW/Hr - 3413 BTU

    Have fun and let us know...

    Vaughn
     
  3. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Not to mention frictional losses, bearing availability and replacement, and the
    tendency of flywheels with high stored energy to explode from the forces
    involved.

    Graham
     
  4. The bearings are magnetic on most of the modern gyros and the like.....
     
  5. Danno

    Danno Guest

    For those of you googling this post, a response to my previous post
    on flywheels (from HVAC guy) contained this link:
    http://home.hccnet.nl/david.dirkse/math/energy.html
    Has some decent information.
     
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