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Altenatives to soldering

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by electronboy, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    hi this is my first post in a while but i was wondering if some people out there knew about some alternatives to soldering

    Thanks for responnding:)
    Electronboy
     
  2. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    Alternatives to soldering

    Hi i was wondering if anyone out there knew some alternatives to soldering
     
  3. poor mystic

    poor mystic

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    Apr 8, 2011
    :)
    Some people like 'wire wrap', and all agree it has its place.
     
  4. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    It depends on the application.
    What IS your application?
    If it's electronics, you have to be very careful.
    Soldering uses heat to connect devices to circuits. If you use some other method to
    connect an electronic device to a circuit, you have to be careful to not damage the
    electronic device you're trying to install.
    Example: You can arc weld the metal parts together, but you'll blow the electronic device in the process.
     
  5. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    no im not gonna use a soldering iron im thinkin something like conductive glue
     
  6. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    ill look it up
     
  7. jackorocko

    jackorocko

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    Apr 4, 2010
    What is wrong with solder? I mean, in your case I think it is more then just not wanting to do it. Maybe if you described your position a little more in detail we could offer up some hints.
     
  8. Resqueline

    Resqueline

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    Jul 31, 2009
    Are you thinking production, prototyping, or home brew (testing or permanent)?
    Afaik conductive glue is used in production in a few rare occurences, but I don't remember where I noticed it. I guess it's expensive, and maybe it's not reliable.
    I've seen some circuit boards use silver paste for through-plating, and for making crossing tracks too (esp. in remote controls).
    Wire wrapping was popular a long time ago, even for small production series. It's labour intensive and bulky though.
    I merged and moved your two identical threads btw..
     
  9. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    i made my own conductive glue from instructables.com this site with a ton of projects for people who love electronics
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2011
  10. willd1971

    willd1971

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    May 22, 2011
    How old do you have to be???? Maybe that's why I can't solder either :)

    Like others said, it depends on what your project is, if you're building a PCB then defy your dad and do soldering behind the shed where he can't see... if it's a few leaded components then you might mount them on a panel and use crimp terminals or even terminal blocks?

    I think conductive glue and pastes are for special applications and they'll present more problems than the one you're trying to solve. But it's not my area so I might be wrong.

    William
    www.labtronix.co.uk
     
  11. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    If your dad lets you play with matches they make flat ribbons of solder that are sold for
    emergency type repairs. It has a very low melting point. I used to buy it from Radio Shack
    but I don't know if they carry it anymore.
     
  12. poor mystic

    poor mystic

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    Apr 8, 2011
    :)
    Low temperature soldering might not be satisfactory soldering. This is because the solder has to be hot enough to dissolve into the surface of the metals it's joining. There is actually a solution of metals involved in the soldered joint. I don't mean to say that hotter is always better, just that cool soldering might not work well.

    There's actually quite of lot of skill involved in keeping a soldering iron safe on a bench. It helps to be tall, too!
    I am fairly tall, with long arms, yet I have often had to lift a soldering iron quite high in order to free it from twists in its own power cable. Could I have done this when I was half my present height? I'm not sure.
    Owing to twists in the heavy power cords, soldering irons can move themselves. Consequences of not knowing where your iron has got to can include burns as well as fires.

    When you get a really good circuit, ask your dad to solder it!

    PS
    you can probably make your own solder ribbon by putting ordinary solder on some flat steel suface and spreading it out along its length with a shape like the back of a spoon. Notice that any actual spoon will now be poisonously contaminated with lead!
    I wonder if a butane lighter would produce a cleaner flame than a match?
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  13. davelectronic

    davelectronic

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    Dec 13, 2010
    Yes.
    Dave. :)
     
  14. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    I don't know what else to tell him.
    Of COURSE the emergency solder isn't the best solution.
    (Maybe I shouldn't even have mentioned it)
    If his dad is dead-set against an iron. I'd go with wire-wrap.
    Maybe I'm just to old, and it's time-consuming, and the tools and supplies for it are not
    used much anymore so they're expensive now.
    But I still do it for one-time only circuits I want done.
    Maybe if dad sees how much is costs to get into wire-wrap these days, he'll reconsider
    a soldering iron.
    At least the wire-wrap should SEEM harmless enough for a youngster.
     
  15. daddles

    daddles

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    Jun 10, 2011
    When e.g. working on autos, crimped connections are preferable to soldered joints. So some type of crimping or other mechanical connection that exceeds the yield point of a metal (like properly-made wire wrap) can make for good joints.

    However, basic soldering is a skill pretty easy to learn with the right teaching. You don't say your age, so it's hard to make a judgment -- and it's impossible to make hard and fast rules. One of my nephews was quite mature for his age and I would have happily taught him at age 8 or 10. On the other hand, my grandson is 15 and he's not my idea of quite responsible enough to be taught soldering. Frankly, your dad is in the best position to make a judgment about when you're ready (well, at least better than we can). If your dad is too inflexible about it, you might see if you can e.g. enlist the aid of a science teacher at school who might be willing to teach you. Don't be surprised if he asks for your parents' permission first though.

    I've got a goodly supply of wirewrap stuff -- if this kid lived near me, I'd just give him some of it...
     
  16. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    How about this?
    Solderless breadboards. They're relatively cheap these days.
    It's not a permanent circuit. But it'd be good for experimenters.
    Radio Shack still sells 'em, with hook-up wire kits.
    Manufacturer's are Elenco, Global, and Twin.
    Google the term electronic breadboards, or the manufacturers, and see if it'll work for
    what you want to do.
     
  17. jackorocko

    jackorocko

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    Apr 4, 2010
    Tell your dad to come on these forums and read.

    To the OP's dad, don't kill his dream to be creative, nurture it and buy the kid a soldering iron and take 30 minutes out of your day to help the boy learn to be responsible.

    This boggles my mind
     
  18. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    boom found it solderless breaboards!thank u im not gonna be doing anything permanent soon so these are it for now
     
  19. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    thanks shrtrnd
     
  20. electronboy

    electronboy

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    Jul 19, 2011
    yo daddles,
    do you live in connecticut?
     
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