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Alarm keypad 6150

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Lucymegee, Apr 13, 2017.

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  1. Lucymegee

    Lucymegee

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    Apr 13, 2017
    I tried to replace an old sticky FA270KP keypad with a new Ademco 6150 keypad (Honeywell verified that 6150 is correct), but I can't get it to work. After pressing keys 1 & 3, I've tried addresses 16 & 31, but still no good. (I shut the power off at the keypad by removing the red wire) Can someone help?
    Thank you.
     
  2. ChosunOne

    ChosunOne

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    115
    Jun 20, 2010
    Eek! Removing and reconnecting the red wire at the keypad is NOT the best way to remove and return power from/to keypad. Some keypads don't like being reconnected that way. If you haven't already zapped your new keypad, I strongly advise removing and returning power at the panel instead: meaning remove one lead from battery and unplug the 16.5VAC transformer. That apparently gives a gentler power-up at the keypad when you plug the transformer back in. (I wait until I have the programming done before re-connecting the battery lead. Just don't forget.)


    Before I can advise on how to address your keypad, I need to know the model of your First Alert control-the main board (the "brains") that lives in a steel cabinet, usually somewhere in a closet, basement, or utility area. The model number will look something like FA110C or FA1600C, etc (over a different models), something like that. You should see it on a system diagram inside the cabinet door that houses your control panel. Even better is finding it silk-screen-printed somewhere along the top edge of the panel itself.

    Also relevant is how many keypads your system has besides the one you replaced?
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  3. Lucymegee

    Lucymegee

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    Apr 13, 2017
     
  4. Lucymegee

    Lucymegee

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    Apr 13, 2017
    Hi Phil, I received your latest answer, but I can't find it now (but I printed it out). I hope I'm not becoming a pain in the butt. I'm old and not too bright. I don't understand your suggestion about wiring up the keypad at the panel (there's a million wire connections). My panel box is in the far side of my basement. I understand that I must shut the power off before checking the addresses at the individual KP's and then checking within 1 minute or so after powering up. I can't do this within this time frame. That's why I removed the red wire. I could take a picture of the panel box and sent it to you if this is possible.

    Thanks,
    Bob
     
  5. ChosunOne

    ChosunOne

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    115
    Jun 20, 2010
    Okay Bob, I probably made my last response too wordy, giving you a lot of information that you don't need. Here's the simplified version:
    You don't have to power-cycle your keypads to check the addresses, only to program a new address in a KP.

    If you have 4 keypads total, then your keypad addresses are most likely to be between 16 and 20. 16 may or may not be in use, but it's available. If 20 is not in use by another KP, then it may not be enabled.

    Press 1 and 3 simultaneously until it beeps, on your other keypads to check their addresses. If one of your other keypads has the address "16", then the highest address of any of your keypads will probably be 19.

    The 6150 Keypad you replaced is unlikely to have an address of 16--that address is usually taken by an Alphanumeric keypad. See what address isn't taken by the other 3 keypads, and try that for your replacement keypad.
    If 16 isn't used by one of the other 3 KPs, then I would use that for your replacement address, because it's always enabled. If 16 is used by another KP, then you will probably need to use 17, 18, or 19, whichever is available.

    When you're ready to try to to program your new KP again, get a buddy to work with you to power up from the panel. DON'T use a wire at the KP to power up.
    I understand your reasoning for "needing" to power up with a live wire at the keypad. Here's my reasoning: When you power up by connecting a live 12VDC wire at the keypad, it sometimes zaps the keypad. Sometimes you get away with it, other times you don't---like running a red light, even for the best of reasons.
    As a last resort, if you can't get a buddy to help, then use a long extension cord to plug in the transformer and plug the cord in near your keypad.

    If your replacement keypad isn't responsive to KP address programming like your other keypads, then you may already have zapped it. Let me know how it goes.

    EDIT: And no, you aren't becoming a pain in the butt. I sometimes forget that not everybody is used to working with hundreds of scrambled wires and I sometimes make my answers more complicated than they need to be.
    I'm afraid I won't buy the "old and not too bright" syndrome, although I'm retired myself and I sometimes pull the age card. But anybody can get confused when you're working with something you're not familiar with.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2017
  6. Lucymegee

    Lucymegee

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    Apr 13, 2017
    Phil, you are a genius. I can't thank you enough.
    I checked the addresses on the other 3 KP's. My front door was 19, my basement was 18 and my outbuilding was 16, so I made the new KP 17 and all OK.
    I like your note, but it doesn't make me any younger. Ha Ha

    I really appreciate your help.
    Bob
     
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