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AirConditioning & Breakers

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Jim Douglas, Jun 2, 2005.

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  1. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

  2. Rowbotth

    Rowbotth Guest

    Of course you've religiously cleaned the condensor of all flying debris
    it may have picked up over your colder season?

    How long have you had it? Is it possible the wiring may have shorted
    due to age or wear?

    My $0.02 worth.

    H.
     
  3. Some things to check:

    1. Make sure that the outdoor condensor is clean. Use a hose
    to flush out any blockage, not any tools that could puncture
    the metal.

    2. Make sure the fan is working.

    3. Turn OFF all the power to the unit, check with a voltmeter,
    then make sure all connections are tight and there are no
    discolored wires near a connection. There may be
    connections to check in the circuit breaker panel (if 240V
    check both red and black wires, if 120V check the white wire)
    , a disconnect near the compressors, where the home wiring
    connects to the A/C unit, and internal to the A/C unit.
    Check that the contacts on the relay/contactor that operates
    the compressor are not burnt. Any poor connections will
    produce a voltage drop and because of the characteristics
    of the electric motor in the compressor, increase the current.

    4. Check that the utility voltage is not low (below 108 volts if
    120V, 216 if 240 volts), consult your utility for service standards.

    5. If you can, check the running current with a clamp-on ammeter
    and compare to the nameplate data (FLA should be listed).

    6. If the running amps are well within the rating of the circuit
    breaker, you may have a degraded circuit breaker.

    Above all, be careful!

    Bill Kaszeta
    Photovoltaic Resources Int'l
    Tempe Arizona USA
     
  4. operator jay

    operator jay Guest

  5. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    The equipment is 15 years new.

     
  6. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    I notice nothing, come home from work and the house is 1500 degrees.
     
  7. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    Thanks for the suggestions, I will check the thing out tomorrow. A few years
    back I had read an article saying that keeping the outside units in the
    shade was a good thing and planted these bushes on either side of the two
    units, the plants are not 10' tall and keep alot of the sunshine off the
    units.
     
  8. Roy Q.T.

    Roy Q.T. Guest

    Well: The first 3 responders have given good advice, if that doesn't
    take care of it you will need to have it checked for gas & recharged it
    accordinlgy (the 15yrs. clued me) if the gas pressure is slight or low
    it will work harder to reach it's temperate zone and heat up & draw more
    current than usual to get it's designed job done., so if all electrical
    connections & devices are good and measurements check out within
    tolerance that may be the next step to take to resolve the tripping.

    ®oy
    I work as a door to door GE AC Technician in the late 70's damn I'm
    getting old };-)®

    From: (Jim Douglas)
    Thanks for the suggestions, I will check the thing out tomorrow. A few
    years back I had read an article saying that keeping the outside units
    in the shade was a good thing and planted these bushes on either side of
    the two units, the plants are not 10' tall and keep alot of the sunshine
    off the units.
    A/C unit has tripped the breaker twice this week, never done it before,
    very hot here. Anything a handyman type could look at before calling the
    big guns out?
    --
    Jim Douglas
    http://www.genesis-software.com
    http://www.interactiveDesignSolutions.com
    http://www.EmailFromTheDead.com
    Latitude     32.96
    Longitude -96.89
     
  9. Very first thing, check to see if the wires to the breaker are
    loose/corroded/overheated. (Turn main off first!)
     
  10. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Another suggestion to add.
    Utility brouwn outs. They are becoming more and more common,
    especially on hot days. Low voltage causes the motors to pull more
    current, tripping the breaker. Once a breaker has tripped, it takes
    less to make it trip the next time, and less the next time etc. etc. I
    had to replace my breaker last year, it just wouldn't hold in when the
    AC started.
     
  11. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Probably. I like to think of it as "thermal memory". Most thermal
    elements in breakers are bi-metal strips. As current flows, the strip
    heats up and because one side expands faster than the other, it bends
    and hits a spring loaded trip bar that activates the breaker
    mechanism. Do that several times, and it no longer comes all the way
    back to the original position, meaning it takes less time to trip
    again.
     
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