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advantages of low voltage?

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by Damien, Jan 12, 2004.

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  1. Damien

    Damien Guest

    What advantages are there to using low voltage appliances when using a RAPS system? Obviously, you could get away with a
    smaller (and therefore cheaper) inverter as the load from 240V appliances would be less, but what about other
    differences such as actual energy requirements? I know they consume less power, but how much less? Obvious candidates
    for low voltage are refrigerators and lighting, but what sort of savings would you achieve under typical usage
    conditions? Would it mean fewer solar panels and a smaller battery bank would be required, or would you still base your
    calculations on the assumption of 100% 240V appliances, and treat the savings in energy requirements as insurance
    against a (literally) rainy day, when you might not otherwise generate enough power? And finally, does anyone know of a
    site somewhere that already has these answers, to save having to post them here? I'm looking, but it's hard to refine
    the search terms enough to get anything genuinely useful! TIA

    Damien
     
  2. Bughunter

    Bughunter Guest

    Try a search for "ohms law" or "ohm's law".

    This simple mathematical formula describes the relationship between voltage,
    current, resistance and power.

    It is not necessarily true that low voltage appliances consume less power.
    They in fact may have some significant disadvantages.

    RAPS system? Obviously, you could get away with a
    would be less, but what about other
    power, but how much less? Obvious candidates
    would you achieve under typical usage
    would be required, or would you still base your
    savings in energy requirements as insurance
    enough power? And finally, does anyone know of a
    here? I'm looking, but it's hard to refine
     
  3. George Ghio

    George Ghio Guest

    Lets start with a direct comparison of two systems each using 5kWh a day.
    First high volts

    240 VOLT WATT HOURS PER DAY 5000 W HOURS

    TOTAL Ah DEMAND PER DAY 231.48 A HOURS

    NUMBER OF DAYS AUTONOMY 5

    MAX. ALLOWABLE DEPTH OF DISCHARGE 0.7

    CAPACITY BATT. BANK 120 Hr RATE 1878.91 A HOURS

    DAILY DEPTH OF DISCHARGE 12.31 %

    NUMBER OF PARALLEL STRINGS 12.96 STRINGS

    Next low volts

    24 VOLT WATT HOURS PER DAY 5000 W HOURS

    TOTAL Ah DEMAND PER DAY 208.33 A HOURS

    NUMBER OF DAYS AUTONOMY 5

    MAX. ALLOWABLE DEPTH OF DISCHARGE 0.7

    CAPACITY BATT. BANK 120 Hr RATE 1691 A HOURS

    DAILY DEPTH OF DISCHARGE 12.32 %

    NUMBER OF PARALLEL STRINGS 11.66 STRINGS


    Note that the daily depth of discharge is the same while the lv system
    requires two less panels and some 200 Ah less batteries.

    After this things get a bit trickier. Choice and placement of lighting
    can save you a lot of energy (with either system).

    It all comes down to your use, your ability to reduce your loads, and
    your ability to think outside the box as they say.

    I use ELV (12 volts) for everything in the house except the computer and
    printer which run off the inverter. If the inverter dies everything else
    still works.

    There will be a lot of posts on this. Hope you like the circus.

    George
     
  4. Guest

    Sounds like your 200 amp resistors :)

    Nick
     
  5. I wholeheartedly agree. I bought a house that started out with 12VDC
    power only, and then had an inverter added later (all before we moved
    in). An intermediate owner tore out all the DC sockets, so now, most
    of my lights are DC, and a few desk / floor lamps and most everything
    else run AC.

    Since power is the product of current and voltage (ignoring power
    factor for the sake of this discussion), if you cut the voltage by a
    factor of 10, (e.g. 24VDC vs 240VAC) the current must increase by a
    factor of 10 to deliver the same power to the load. And, since power
    can also be expressed as the square of the current times resistance
    (again keeping it simple here) that means that the power lost in the
    wire goes up by a factor of 100! As other posters have pointed out,
    that suggests using larger guage wire to minimize wire losses. Then
    there is the need to run both AC and DC wiring. Yuck.

    DC appliances are *sometimes* more efficient, and it's true that they
    can be run directly from the batteries without firing up the inverter
    (incurring fixed overhead + conversion efficiency loss therein).
    However, unless they draw little power and are situated close to the
    batteries, your savings could be eaten up by increased wire losses.

    Since I run a very modest setup and keep a tight control on
    consumption, it does annoy me to fire up a big inverter for the sake
    of running some little dinky gizmo. And, I'm a big fan of redundancy
    and simplicity, so I really appreciate knowing that I can still have
    some DC-powered light to see my damn inverter if it blows up.

    But if I had to do it all from scratch, I would wire completely for
    normal line-voltage AC and provide a few emergency DC lights, even if
    I was just doing a cabin or something of that nature.

    Another benefit of sticking to AC distribution is that this confines
    the "weirdness" component to the power room. The rest of the system
    remains "normal" so far as regular folks, future owners or
    electricians are concerned.

    -=s
     
  6. I wholeheartedly agree with the other posters here. I bought a house
    that started out with 12VDC power only, and then had an AC inverter
    added later (all before we took over). An intermediate owner tore out
    all the DC sockets, so now, most of my lights are DC, while a few desk
    / floor lamps and most everything else run AC. I get to experience a
    mixed voltage system and develop an opinion without having my mind
    warped by the original conditions and decisions that fed into it.

    Since power is the product of current and voltage (ignoring power
    factor for the sake of this discussion), if you cut the supply voltage
    by a factor of 10, (e.g. 24VDC vs 240VAC) the current must increase by
    a factor of 10 to deliver the same power to the load. If you're
    looking at running 12V, then make that a factor of 20.

    And, since power can also be expressed as the square of the current
    times resistance (again keeping it simple here) that means that wire
    losses soar! As other posters have pointed out, that suggests using
    larger guage wire to minimize losses. Then there is the need to run
    both AC and DC wiring everywhere. Yuck.

    DC appliances are *sometimes* more efficient, and it's true that they
    can be run directly from the batteries without firing up the inverter
    (incurring fixed overhead + conversion efficiency loss therein).
    However, unless they draw little power and/or are situated close to
    the batteries, your energy savings could quickly be eaten up by
    increased wire losses. And from an economic standpoint, DC appliances
    are less common and often more expensive. Couple that with more and
    bigger wire and it starts to look like a Bad Idea from an economic
    standpoint as well.

    Since I run a very modest setup and keep a tight control on
    consumption, it does annoy me to fire up a big inverter for the sake
    of running some little dinky gizmo, especially if the little dinky
    gizmo has a wallwart power supply to convert the AC back down to low
    voltage DC!

    I'm a big fan of redundancy and simplicity, so I must admit really
    appreciate knowing that I can still have some DC-powered light to see
    my damn inverter if it blows up.

    But if I had to do it all from scratch, I would wire completely for
    normal line-voltage AC and provide a few emergency DC lights, even if
    I was just doing a cabin or something of that nature. For a very
    small, simple, compact system (short wire runs, few appliances) I
    might still go DC.

    BTW, another benefit of sticking to AC distribution is that this
    confines the "weirdness" component to the power room. The rest of the
    system remains "normal" so far as regular folks, future owners, or
    electricians are concerned. Also means that you can upgrade to a
    different primary voltage (12V to 24V or 48V) without orphaning a
    bunch of 12V gear or having to install a 24V/12V converter to keep it
    - which is exactly the decision I'm facing now.

    I may well end up completely rewiring this place yet. <sigh>

    -=s
     
  7. Damien

    Damien Guest

    That is indeed the tricky part! Time is on my side though, as it will be some time before I will be able to implement my
    plans - and therefore plenty of time to make sure I get it right!
    I was thinking I'd probably still have the house fully wired for 240V AC, but have a secondary 12V circuit as well,
    which would run lights etc, and maybe a fridge (depending on the merits of various models available). It would mean
    doubling up on some things, but as you say, if the inverter dies it wouldn't then be such a big deal. So far, the only
    real negative that seems to have come up is the issue of running higher gauge wires (which would also be limited in
    length to avoid the problem of dropping too much voltage - iirc, about 20m max length for a 12V system?), but I don't
    see that as being such a big deal.
    Indeed I will! :) I know enough to understand the various points that people make, but not enough to really have any
    sort of an in-depth technical discussion on the pros and cons of the various options - so the more info people post, the
    more I can learn! I'm trying to find out what I can, but there is so much information to wade through it's a bit hard
    working what is relevant to my needs and what isn't. All part of the fun!

    Damien
     
  8. Damien

    Damien Guest

    "Remote Area Power Supply" - basically, it's a term used to cover the various power generation systems used in off-grid
    setups (eg. solar, wind, micro-hydro, etc). Quite a common term here in Australia - maybe not so much in the US?

    Damien
     
  9. George Ghio

    George Ghio Guest

    Poor Nick needs everything explained in triplicate.

    240 VOLT WATT HOURS PER DAY

    This is of course the Watt hours used per day at 240 Volts or your local
    voltage (US -110 or 220) supplied from an inverter.

    So it follows that

    24 VOLT WATT HOURS PER DAY

    is the watt hours used per day at system voltage (12 - 24 - 48 Volts
    ELV)

    George
     
  10. George Ghio

    George Ghio Guest

    I often recommend an ELV (12 24 48 V) lighting circuit in the ceiling
    and a LV (240V) base board circuit for power.

    I run all my lights, TV and stereo on 12V while the computer, printer,
    and the sometime cake mixer off the inverter.

    My lighting is almost all QH lamps in 5 & 10 Watts. All lighting is
    placed at work stations and kept down low close to the job.

    As an example the breakfast bar has three 5W lamps. The lamps are under
    cupboards two foot above the counter top. This was planned at the
    drawing stage for the house plans.

    The same setup is used for the bread/pasta bench, the work bench next to
    the stove, the stove itself and the kitchen sink. In all there are 15
    seperate lamps in the kitchen/dinning area.

    The pantry has a 20W flouro. This may be on for as much as 3 minuets a
    day.

    The house uses only 1.2 kWh a day for the electricity. My fridge and
    cooking is LPG as is the new HWS. The old wood fired unit has died.

    I have reading lights placed for the job near chairs. My office has two
    5W lamps for the desk. One on each side to minimise shadowes.

    Hope this helps you with your design work.

    George L Ghio
    Solar Power Consultant
     
  11. Ken Finney

    Ken Finney Guest

    RAPS system? Obviously, you could get away with a
    would be less, but what about other
    power, but how much less? Obvious candidates
    would you achieve under typical usage
    would be required, or would you still base your
    savings in energy requirements as insurance
    enough power? And finally, does anyone know of a
    here? I'm looking, but it's hard to refine
    One, and about the only real advantage is if you are into radio dxing. My
    place will have a low voltage DC circuit
    just so I can shut down all the AC to provide less radio interference.
     
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