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Adding motor into simple circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Happinessishorizontal, Jul 1, 2018.

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  1. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    Hello. Im New to electronics of any kind, so any help appreciated. IV made the circuit in the diagram and it works.. However I want to add a motor, triggering when the switch operates.

    Image
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NItqxFa9Ik0oeQqjqdOPX2vHjqz7oNaW/view?usp=drivesdk

    If I do this now it basically sucks all the power and the sound module doesn't run.. Which makes sense..

    Any suggestions on how I could achieve this?

    Thanks Steve
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    933
    Oct 5, 2014
    We do not join different organisations to view your links.
    Post sketch or photo here.
     
    Happinessishorizontal likes this.
  3. Kabelsalat

    Kabelsalat

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    Jul 5, 2011
    Second that - even if I have a valid google account, the link goes to a page that still ask for permission.
     
    Happinessishorizontal likes this.
  4. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    [​IMG]
    Here we go. Sorry about that. I couldn't get an url on my phone earlier.

    Thanks for the replies so far
     
  5. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Bigger batteries, or separate batteries for the motor and a second reed switch close enough to the first one to be operated by the same magnet. What information do you have about the motor - voltage, current, power, etc?

    ak
     
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  6. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    I had thought of doing it with a second reed but not sure if it would work in this application.

    The magnet will be attached to the minute hand if a quartz clock and would be used to switch on the sound and motor at the same time.. So not sure how well they would sync.. I'll give it a go though.

    I'm not clued up on electronics, so all I can tell you is the motor is a geared one that can operate between 3 and 12v. I was aiming to run it at about 3v DC

    Cheers for the reply
     
  7. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    933
    Oct 5, 2014
    Reed switches are typically used as sensors and at 500mA max not designed to switch motors.
    Use a relay, transistor or mosfet to drive the motor.
    You can still use the reed switch to activate the motor driver.
    What is the battery bank made up from?
     
  8. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    Obviously, the battery cannot supply enough current to operate the motor plus the sound module. Use a more powerful battery.
    American and European batteries are powerful, Chinese batteries are garbage. Carbon-zinc and Super Heavy Duty batteries are also garbage.
    AAA cells produce very low current for a short time.
    AA cells produce low current for a longer time.
    C and D cells produce much more current for a longer time but some D cells have a smaller C cell inside.
    The motor you are using has a minimum voltage of 3V but your 4.5V battery quickly drops to less than 3V.
     
  9. darren adcock

    darren adcock

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    Sep 26, 2016
    Also, what is your sound module please?
     
  10. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    Thanks everyone.

    Ok - sound module is an ISD1820
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ISD1820-...535768?hash=item3d1bddf3d8:g:E~wAAOSw705Z4fAf

    Batterywise I can use anything I can fit in my clock design.. As long as they're generally available.

    I could do it with 2 switches as mentioned prior. I looked at those ir proximity switches, that I think could be used to detect the minute hand..?..

    I haven't used them before though, so anyone know if that's feasible?

    Cheers

    Dave
     
  11. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    You must select a motor and batteries that are not overloaded. Try three new AAA alkaline cells, then AA, then C then D.
     
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  12. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    As AAA and D are 1.5v do they not have the same output, but the Ds will last longer in the same application?
     
  13. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    Hi again

    I have just been trying to work out those optical switches

    Do they simply work as a switch? ie you power accordingly and when they detect a reflection from a mirror for e.g. they put the power through to whatever is connected?

    Im looking at the
    Vishay TCRT5000 Optical Switch Phototransistor Output

    https://rapidonline.com/vishay-tcrt5000-optical-switch-phototransistor-output-60-8260

    If this was the case it would be ideal in my application, however my gut tells be they're more complex..
     
  14. BobK

    BobK

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    No, the internal resistance is higher on the smaller cells, so they cannot deliver as much current.

    If you short circuit (not recommended) a D cell might provide 10 Amps, whereas an AAA would not even reach 1Amp.

    Bob
     
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  15. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    Thanks Bob.

    Im at the level when i haven't digested Amps, voltage etc.. and their meaning..!

    So if im running a motor at 3v with a light load on the motor, wanting the best battery life, am I better on Ds or AAAs?

    Thanks
     
  16. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    A large battery cell can provide much more current than a small battery cell. The current drawn by your motor overloaded your battery because the motor is too powerful using too much current that your battery could provide, because the battery was too old or poor quality, or because the battery was too small.

    A tiny button battery cell also produces 1.5V, the same voltage as a huge and heavy D cell. But the tiny cell cannot produce much current.

    The datasheet of an Energizer AAA alkaline battery cell shows that it can provide a current of 0.5A for a little less than one hour but then the voltage has dropped to 0.8V. It cannot produce much more current than 0.5A.
    Their D cell can provide a current of 0.5A for 18 hours, or 1A for 8 hours or 5A for maybe a little more than one hour.

    Your motor must have a datasheet that says how much current it uses at 3V when it is working harder that yours will be working.
     
  17. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    D's will give you about 12 times as much run time as AAA, if the AAAs could do the job, which they apparently cannot.

    Bob
     
    Happinessishorizontal likes this.
  18. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,768
    2,425
    Nov 17, 2011
    Not likely, see this discussion.
    A photoelectric reflex sensor would work.
    That is too little information. We need at least the current consumption of the motor when running from 3 V.
    If the current consumption is too much for the battery, it will not help to have 2 separate switches as the voltage drop from the motor's current draw will still stop the sound module from operating. You need to make sure that the battery is able to supply enough current for both motor and sound module at the same time.
    Even so, chances are that electrical noise from the motor will interfere with the sound module's operation. A filter between the battery and the sound module may help. Use an RC low pass filter made from a small resistor (e.g. 10 Ω) and a large capacitor (e.g. 470 µF).
     
  19. Happinessishorizontal

    Happinessishorizontal

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    Jul 1, 2018
    Many thanks for all the advice all. Im going to take some time and digest it all..
     
    darren adcock likes this.
  20. darren adcock

    darren adcock

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    Sep 26, 2016
    If you aren't too attached to the motor you have already it could be useful to offer up some options you find on the internet that are similar. We can then get an idea of what rpm you require, torque needed (I'm assuming not much, but then we haven't seen your mechanism)... this way we can look at the spec sheet that goes with the motor and work out what is best for you. In the mean time, best of luck.
     
    Harald Kapp likes this.
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