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AC Voltage Reference

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Mio, Dec 22, 2008.

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  1. Mio

    Mio Guest

    Hello all,

    I'm trying to think of a good way to get a precise AC voltage (224VAC)
    out of line voltage.

    Thus far, I've thought of the following options:

    Use a decent DC power supply, and buy an inverter. From the inverter,
    use a 120/224 transformer (I can wind this myself) From what I saw,
    most cheap inverters have crappy voltage regulation, though.

    Use a decent DC power supply, and build an inverter. I've never built
    an inverter, but I understand the theory behind them.

    Use a constant voltage transformer, and hook it up to a 240/224
    transformer. CVTs seem very expensive, though. So I don't really like
    this.

    Use something like an ac/ac chopper motor drive, sample voltage and
    adjust the regulator with a microcontroller or comparator. I'm the
    least sure about this method.

    I'm looking for +-1%. Any other ideas? Any of these really stupid?

    Thanks
     
  2. Mio

    Mio Guest

    I forgot to mention anything about power.

    Basically, this gets hooked up to a transformer, rectified, filtered,
    voltage divided, and sampled by a microcontroller.
     
  3. So the power requirement is quite low?

    How about:

    signal generator -> power amp -> transformer run backwards.

    I don't know if you can rely on a normal audio power amp to have gain
    constant to 1% - but I expect others here do. Otherwise you could make
    something, look for high power opamps etc.
     
  4. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Mio"

    I forgot to mention anything about power.

    Basically, this gets hooked up to a transformer, rectified, filtered,
    voltage divided, and sampled by a microcontroller.


    ** So you are going for a world's record in pointless and futile circuit
    design ?

    This loon would have to be the Google Groper fuckwit of the year.



    ...... Phil
     
  5. Huh?
    What's the point in doing all that?
    What are you actually trying to do/achieve?

    Dave.
     
  6. Mio

    Mio Guest

    We swap out components pretty often, and have to recalibrate based on
    the differences in transformers/resistors/diodes/etc. As our line
    voltage can vary by a lot, I was just trying to think of an easy way
    to do the recalibration.
     
  7. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest


    We swap out components pretty often, and have to recalibrate based on
    the differences in transformers/resistors/diodes/etc.As our line
    voltage can vary by a lot, I was just trying to think of an easy way
    to do the recalibration.


    ** Makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

    Surely you can measure the mains voltage at any time and calibrate your
    device based on that reading.

    Be aware the mains voltage is not a very good sine wave so the peak and rms
    values are not precisely related by the sq.rt of 2.


    ...... Phil
     
  8. Charles

    Charles Guest

    AC to DC and then DC to AC via an inverter, with a tight feedback loop based
    on a stable reference.
     
  9. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    Variac ?

    You can get a motorized type to have it controlled to maintain voltage.
    That's about as simple as it gets..

    http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5"
     
  10. Guest

    Hey, year's not over yet.
     
  11. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    here's another:

    on-line sine-wave UPS followed by a step-up transformer
    or better, a 230V sine-wave on-line UPS followed by a
    230V to 224V autotransformer (can be made from a 230 to 6V transofmer)
     
  12. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    just uase a variac, dial up 224V and then do your measurements.
    if you see frequent voltage fluctuations you may need to add an alarm
    to warn you when it needs readjustment.
     
  13. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Of course! Googles NEVER like the right answer - I think that's why they
    resort to googlegroups.

    If you think buying a CVT off the shelf is expensive, just add up all of
    the costs of inventing any other of those schemes.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
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