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AC plug for DC purpose?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Madsalts, Jul 17, 2015.

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  1. Madsalts

    Madsalts

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    Sep 25, 2014
    I have a trolling motor to which I'm hooking up a Pulse Width Modulator. I have installed plugs meant for DC purposes, but am not happy with them. These plugs use a solder connection to wire, which has failed twice already. I'd rather screw a wire down than solder it. Furthermore, the plugs are a real pain to separate. The system has a voltage of 12V and a max draw of 29A. I'd like to set the system up with AC jacks and plugs, since these will not have the aforementioned problems. I see that most AC plugs are rated for 15A and 125V. My purpose would use less power overall and less voltage, but would still send significantly more amperage through the plug. Is this a problem, or can I use AC jacks/plugs? Thanks.
     
  2. Minder

    Minder

    3,215
    700
    Apr 24, 2015
    You can get a larger version that is 50amps.
    If in NA you can get them at HD or any electrical supplier.
    If the 30amp draw is just for a brief period, you May get away with it with the 15a. but it may be a problem with terminating that size of wire.
    M.
     
  3. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

    2,639
    764
    Jun 10, 2015
    Generally speaking, connector contact spacing, the air gap between metal parts, sets the max. operating voltage; metal thickness sets the max. current rating. So a connector that is rated for 15 A at 1000 V is good for only 15 A at 1 V. The limiting factor is heat generated by the resistance at the actual contact area, which can be way smaller than the overall size of a connector pin. You might be able to get away with taking a connector rated for continuous duty at one current and running it a higher current for a shorter time, but there is no way to calculate what the final reliability might be.

    ak
     
  4. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    856
    Jul 7, 2015
    What was the failure mode? If solder joint melted then the connector is overloaded. If wire fractured then proper cable support (e.g. a rigid splint) at and near the joint is needed.
     
  5. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

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    Aug 11, 2014
    battery.jpg.jpg
     
  6. Madsalts

    Madsalts

    73
    2
    Sep 25, 2014
    The connectors I am using (made for DC) attach to wire via solder. The wire pulled out of the solder. This might be solved to some degree by separating the strands of wire from each other prior to soldering. If I were to support the wire, I'd have to jerry rig something. The plug in the previous post is similar to what I'm already using.
     
  7. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

    2,639
    764
    Jun 10, 2015
    Those look like knock-offs of Andereson Power connectors, the gold standard of golf cart chargers. The contacts are supposed to be crimped onto the wire, not soldered. Pull=out probably is caused by not enough heat and/or flux during soldering. If might be counter-intuitive, but crimping is more reliable.

    I've seen the connectors and crimp tools at Lowes / Home Depot.

    ak
     
  8. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,239
    749
    Aug 11, 2014
    Not relevant to your boat, but there's an electrical code that says to make mechanical connections (crimp) before any soldering. This is to prevent solder blowout like you experienced.

    Not bad advice in your situation.
    It's also important to use the right crimp tool for the job.
     
  9. Externet

    Externet

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    186
    Aug 24, 2009
    Yes. AC plugs/jacks for DC.
    If you choose a 4 terminal type, can wire two and two paralleled for redundant current sharing. No way to plug it reversed polarity either. And meant to carry the amperage.
    ----> https://duckduckgo.com/?q=range+plug+and+outlet&t=canonical&ia=images

    ----> http://electrical.about.com/od/appliances/ss/rangereceptacle.htm#step5

    Or the less known and less brute Neutrik NL4, NL8 speakeon :

    ----> https://duckduckgo.com/?q=speakon+connectors&t=canonical&ia=images
    ----> http://www.neutrik.com/en/?q=nl4
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
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