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About Servo Motors

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by gokhan karaova, Dec 22, 2015.

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  1. gokhan karaova

    gokhan karaova

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    Dec 22, 2015
    Hello,

    I have to run servo motor by different dc inputs but I am only allowed to use analog components. Do you have any recommedns how to crete this circuit?
     
  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Depends what you need to do with it... a 555 timer can control a servo.
    Is this homework? What is your goal for this?
     
  3. gokhan karaova

    gokhan karaova

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    0
    Dec 22, 2015
    Its my term project and I am only allowed to use transistors, opamps , resistor. capacitor, inductor and ldr. I have to send a signal to servo motor so as in one condition it stays closed and in another condition it opens for a while. Both voltages that reaches to servo are in DC. I think, I have to construct a circuit that transform the signal from DC to pulse with PWM. I found couple of ways but both of them are very complicated and messy. I am not very familar with PWM and maybe there is a way to make it easy. Any recommends?
     
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    4,226
    896
    Oct 5, 2014
    As Gryd3 says, 555 timer and a couple of switches.
    mmm...no switches or linear ic's allowed.
    Still, ldr could make the timing change and from memory one can get a 741 or similar to do the timing.....just not as simple and simple is another required parameter.
     
  5. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    312
    Aug 31, 2014
    It's far too hard to control a servo with individual components.
    The input timing signal is very complex.
    Your teacher obviously doesn't have a clue about electronics.
    A 555 is analogue and is just two op amps and an amplifier.
     
    Gryd3 likes this.
  6. GPG

    GPG

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    Sep 18, 2015
    Standard input for RC servos is1mS to 2ms pulse 1.5 ms being centre. The spacing between pulses is not very critical. Not very complex at all
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Servo_control
    OP: you can make an oscillator from an op-amp and control the width of the pulse. That's your start. A big hint, it requires both positive and negative feedback. If you want to impress the tutor use a couple of transistors in an astable multivibrator.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2015
    Gryd3 likes this.
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