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about 2 wire alligator clips

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Kardo22, Mar 7, 2014.

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  1. Kardo22

    Kardo22

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    Mar 7, 2014
    Hi
    I have a question about these clips:
    http://www.sefelec.com/en/accessories-ground-continuity-CO183
    One wire goes to source and the other to return (ground?). The wires are connected to a tester and the clip to a common nut from where a wire goes to an electronic circuit that is tested.
    I'd like to know how the clip is working. My end goal would be to lose the clip and solder the wires directly (so they can't be removed) but I have no idea how I should do it. I can't use this clip but perhaps there is a way to permanently solder 2 common alligator clips?

    Sorry if its a real noop question but my knowledge in electronics is real patchy, I can be a real idiot in some areas.
    thanks
     
  2. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt

    426
    4
    Nov 12, 2013
    Hi Kardo22,

    Welcome to this forum.

    I can't make heads or tales out of this string of words from Eaton:
    For example, is it a "two-wire lead," do "two wires lead," or is it "two, wire leads?"

    It would be easier to understand, if you can just sketch what you want to do.

    John
     
  3. Kardo22

    Kardo22

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    Mar 7, 2014
    It look like this:
    Clip end:
    [​IMG]
    Tester end:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    It looks like this is meant to be a Kelvin connection (or 4-wire connection) for measuring resistance. As such, it is useless if the two conenctors are inserted into one another and then into the clip. You should use a separate clip for each connector (see Wikipedia reference).

    Sure you can solder one clip to each wire, why not? Or do I misunderstand your question?
     
  5. Kardo22

    Kardo22

    35
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    Mar 7, 2014
    Disregard the 2 wires on the left. Yes it can be used to measure resistance when using those 4 wires but I'm measuring current(its a high voltage withstanding test).
    [​IMG]
    The measuring is done like this:
    [​IMG]
    The big dongle (the black thing with red tip) supplies voltage.
     
  6. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Your images don't show, please try again.

    How are you supposed to measure current if you short the two wires in the clamp as shown in the top image of your second post? To measure current you need two separate wires, not shorted ones.
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    I purchased some of these to make a kelvin resistance cable and they are "most excellent".
     
  8. Kardo22

    Kardo22

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    Mar 7, 2014
    Sorry, ment leakage current. I think it should be something like this:
    http://www.leakagecurrenttesting.co.uk/
    But I'm not sure. Does it seem rigth.
     
  9. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    No matter what kind of current you're testing, you still measure the current between two point. When you short the inputs of your instrument, it cannot measure current.The example you give also measures current in a conductor or curent throúgh an operator, respectively. Therefore the two point between which the current is measured are
    1) housing
    2) earth
     
  10. Kardo22

    Kardo22

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    0
    Mar 7, 2014
    Well, but it works like this. Not made up by me, its in the manual.
    Can it be (looking at the picture below) that the high voltage probe acts as wire connecting to L. And wires connecting to N and PE are both connected to the clip?
    [​IMG]
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Not if you want to measure current.

    To measure current in the protective earth you would break it and place the current meter in series with it.
     
  12. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Your figure doesn't show where and how the instrument is connected. Besides you mention a high voltage probe. A oltage probe is unsuitable for measuring current.
     
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