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A relatively unimportant announcement...

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Paul Burridge, Dec 24, 2003.

  1. Bill Garber

    Bill Garber Guest

    : On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 20:06:43 -0500, "Bill Garber"
    :
    : I have a *very* large hard-drive on my simulation machine ;-)
    :
    : ...Jim Thompson

    Point taken. I could also post links to some
    very interesting homebrew interfaces that people
    designed and built for Apple IIs, C64, others.
    I wasn't sure if you guys were interested in any
    vintage computer projects. Here is a particularly
    interesting one that the builder actually did
    produce and sell. This was a revision for a 2nd
    run. Uses an Altera IC of some type for the GLU.
    I have 2 of them and plan on 2 more soon. Sorry,
    I can take NO credit for this one. I am designing
    one for the Apple IIc though, and it'll have to
    be dropped onto the CPU socket with another socket
    onboard the controller for the CPU. Anyway, here's
    Rich's card.

    http://dreher.net/CFforAppleII/

    Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
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  2. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    Me for one. I've also got a Kaypro 4, a VIC-20, a Victor 1000, a
    Sinclair Z-81, and a Morrow MicroDecision.

    Jim
     
  3. Bill Garber

    Bill Garber Guest

    : On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 20:17:54 -0500, "Bill Garber"
    <> wroth:
    :
    : >"Mark Jones" <127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    :
    : >: You could always post them here, using some obscure title
    like
    : >"STD's" or
    : >: something. :)
    : >
    : >I could do that. How many of you guys have Apple IIs? ;-)
    : >Quite a few of them are for those.
    : >
    : >Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
    : >Web Site - http://garberstreet.netfirms.com
    : >Email -
    : >Remove - SPAM and X to contact me
    : >
    : Me for one. I've also got a Kaypro 4, a VIC-20, a Victor 1000,
    a
    : Sinclair Z-81, and a Morrow MicroDecision.
    :
    : Jim

    Great, I thought I was alone in here. ;-)
    Do you frequent the comp.sys.apple2 NGs
    as well?

    Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
    Web Site - http://garberstreet.netfirms.com
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  4. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    No. I used to visit Fido Net's Apple forums, but that was a long time
    ago.

    Jim
     
  5. Bill Garber

    Bill Garber Guest

    : On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 21:05:09 -0500, "Bill Garber"
    <> wroth:
    : >
    : >: Me for one. I've also got a Kaypro 4, a VIC-20, a Victor
    1000,
    : >: a Sinclair Z-81, and a Morrow MicroDecision.
    : >: Jim
    : >Great, I thought I was alone in here. ;-)
    : >Do you frequent the comp.sys.apple2 NGs
    : >as well?
    : No. I used to visit Fido Net's Apple forums, but that was a
    long time
    : ago.
    : Jim

    How long since you actually ran the Apple II?
    I never had any Apple Computers until about a
    year and a half ago. Kind feel badly that I didn't
    buy Apple IIs instead of Atari. They're kinda fun
    to tear apart and try to hook them up to scud missiles.
    Oops, did I say that? Oh well. It's nice to know
    I am not alone in here with vintage boxes.

    Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
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  6. In reality, its way, way more than this for anyone. As my usual
    bit...the brain is a Darwinian machine etc..., i.e. Genetic Algorithms,
    that is, it achieves *all* that is does by random variation, selection
    and replication. It can takes millions of generations before a final
    correct result pops out.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.

    That which is mostly observed, is that which replicates the most.
    http://www.anasoft.co.uk/replicators/index.html
     
  7. I still have one. *3D0G <enter>
     
  8. Chuck Harris

    Chuck Harris Guest

    Did it take six, or seven pints of Guiness to drive your Darwinian
    machine to randomly arrive at this conclusion?

    -Chuck
     
  9. LOL!
    Kev is actually right in principle, though, for such a consice
    explanation of a complex matter.
     
  10. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    I built my first Apple ][ (clone) from a bare PC board and a bunch of
    ICs somewhere around 1980. The DIP sockets were the most expensive parts. I
    put it into a cardboard box and used a power supply from an old TRS-80 to get it
    going. I programmed my VIC-20 so that one of its I/O ports could plug into the
    keyboard socket of the Apple. That gave me a programmable keyboard! I could
    also use the VIC's cassette for Apple program storage.

    I bought a used Apple 2C about 10 years ago and that's the last time I
    actually had an Apple running. I got the 2C to see if I could get an old
    ProFile hard disk to run, but the ProFile really needs a Lisa of Apple III.
    There used to be some interface cards for the old ][, but I've never been able
    to find one. There's 10 megs on that old hard drive. I wonder what sort of
    "treasures" are stored on it.
    The first computer system that I actually got paid to put together used
    an Atari 600. It measured the length and width of a bundle of sheets of wood
    veneer to get its surface area, multiplied it by the number of sheets in the
    bundle, and printed out an invoice for a pallet full of bundles. Each bundle
    was a different size and shape.

    Jim
     
  11. <snip>

    Sure? If he connects the meter thingy in parallel to that only diode instead
    of in series with it, the whole circuit might as well start working (not
    that it will work well ...), especially after some minor resistor changes.
    The inductance of the meter will be high enough to not let it pass a too
    high current at 40MHz, so the DC voltage offset across the diode (after the
    cap charges up) could well drive a meter. Without proper shielding the AC
    part will likely get picked up by the antenna and cause oscillation, but
    giving the OP the benefit of the doubt I assume he handles the shielding.

    Dimitrij
     
  12. Bill Garber

    Bill Garber Guest

    : On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 03:50:17 -0500, "Bill Garber"
    <> wroth:
    : >
    : >: No. I used to visit Fido Net's Apple forums, but that was a
    : >long time
    : >: ago.
    : >: Jim
    : >
    : >How long since you actually ran the Apple II?
    :
    : I built my first Apple ][ (clone) from a bare PC board and a
    bunch of
    : ICs somewhere around 1980. The DIP sockets were the most
    expensive parts. I
    : put it into a cardboard box and used a power supply from an old
    TRS-80 to get it
    : going. I programmed my VIC-20 so that one of its I/O ports
    could plug into the
    : keyboard socket of the Apple. That gave me a programmable
    keyboard! I could
    : also use the VIC's cassette for Apple program storage.
    :
    : I bought a used Apple 2C about 10 years ago and that's the last
    time I
    : actually had an Apple running. I got the 2C to see if I could
    get an old
    : ProFile hard disk to run, but the ProFile really needs a Lisa
    of Apple III.
    : There used to be some interface cards for the old ][, but I've
    never been able
    : to find one. There's 10 megs on that old hard drive. I wonder
    what sort of
    : "treasures" are stored on it.

    I have a Profile controller for Apple II slot.
    Care to buy it, or sell me the drive? I would
    be more than happy to transfer your 10 MB files
    to disk. If the drive still works that is. ;-)

    Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
    Web Site - http://garberstreet.netfirms.com
    Email -
    Remove - SPAM and X to contact me
     
  13. Bill Garber

    Bill Garber Guest

    : "Bill Garber" <> schreef in bericht
    : : >
    : > I could do that. How many of you guys have Apple IIs? ;-)
    : > Quite a few of them are for those.
    : >
    : I still have one. *3D0G <enter>

    Kool. I have a housefull ranging from
    a II+ to a ROM3 IIgs. Much fun in them
    still. Set it up, we'll play around with
    them. Lots of them still around too.
    Many newbies picking them up along with
    oldies replacing ones they sold years ago.
    I'd like to join the UG here, but they are
    over an hour away. They have 9 members.

    Bill @ GarberStreet Enterprizez };-)
    Web Site - http://garberstreet.netfirms.com
    Email -
    Remove - SPAM and X to contact me
     
  14. Ben Bradley

    Ben Bradley Guest

    Or at least without getting caught. :)
    If being wrong makes you depressed AND being depressed stops you
    from working/learning, then engineering is probably not for you. My
    employers never much cared about my attitude or how I felt (and that
    was often a good thing...), but they really cared about me being right
    and doing correct work.

    I dunno why, but when I was taking electrical engineering classes,
    the profs would talk about building this hypothetical bridge (not of
    diodes, nor Wheatstone's invention, but the kind you walk over or
    drive a car over - isn't that a civil engineering task?) - I recall
    when someone asked about "partial credit" on a test problem (he missed
    the problem on the previous day's test, and the prof was going over
    it), the prof responded "what if you designed a bridge, they built it,
    and it turned out to be only 80 percent as long as it should have
    been, should you still get 80 percent of your salary?"
    Did anyone else's prof talk about a bridge, or was it just my
    school?
    That must be a hazard of working at home. Or is it a hazard of
    being married?
    Do wives mind if you drop bits of insulation and solder on the
    floor?
     
  15. Getting it done on time is often more important than getting it
    "right". "Never enough time to do it right; always enough time to do
    it over." ;-)
    No, I want 100% of my salary (why they call it "salary"). If the boss
    isn't pleased I may get 0% tomorrow, but I've already earned yesterdays
    pay. Of course profit sharing is another issue...
    You're unique. ;-) Partial credit and curved exams were the norm for
    us. Indeed one usually got 90% credit for just setting up the
    equations. Arithmetic/algebra errors weren't heavily punished. One EE
    prof gave exams that weren't intended to be finished and 50-55% was
    usually the A/B cut-off. I remember a physics exam where a zero was
    curved to 50 and 10 was curved to a barely passing 70 (weird bimodal
    distribution on that exam).
    ....especially when the bits burn the carpet. Wives are so narrow
    minded about such things.
     
  16. Chuck Harris

    Chuck Harris Guest

    Old Jim George, my Statics/Dynamics/Strengths of Materials prof used to
    talk that way whenever someone tried to get partial credit for some
    test problem where they got the wrong answer, the right way. He would
    say basically that, "You have to be right sometime. What if you were
    building a bridge, and you made a mistake calculating the loads, and the
    bridge fell down? Do you think it would be of any comfort to the
    families of the people driving over that bridge to know you almost got
    the numbers right?"

    Some of the best lessons were when we got him sidetracked into talking
    about the airplanes he designed during WWII. One of my favorites was
    about the cockpit for the Corsair (IIRC) They were changing the cockpit
    from one made up of metal framing and plexyglass sheets into a molded
    plexyglass cockpit. The problem was an important one, so they gave it
    to the best engineer, a guy from MIT. This guy spent weeks and weeks
    calculating out the exact strengths necessary for every part of the
    plastic structure. It was beginning to look like he would never finish,
    so they gave the problem to Jim George, and he handed in his result in
    some incredibly quick amount of time. His cockpit was slightly heavier
    than was necessary, but was more than twice as strong as was necessary,
    and was much lighter than the original. What he did, was put a big
    honking piece of bullet proof glass as the front windshield, and made
    the entire rest of the cockpit out of one thickness of plexyglass.

    His justification for designing the cockpit the way he did, was
    something along the lines of good enough beats best when you don't have
    unlimited time and money to spend.

    The MIT engineer was trying to make the cockpit so the thickness exactly
    matched the strength necessary for any point on the screen. It would
    have been impossible to build given 1940's technology.

    -Chuck Harris
     
  17. I read in sci.electronics.design that Keith R. Williams
    com>) about 'A relatively unimportant announcement...', on Mon, 29 Dec
    2003:
    Latin 'salarium' - money to buy salt with.
     
  18. Keith R. Williams wrote ...

    Or actually salt itself (which was a form of money
    in those days).
     
  19. But salt was "sal", and "sal-arium" was the bread with which to buy
    salt.

    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  20. I read in sci.electronics.design that Chuck Harris <>
    That's why the Prof was not really right to choose a bridge as the
    example. They are (or were, before we had computers) typically built
    with big safety factors - 3 to 6, so that even if the calculations were
    off, it wouldn't be disastrous.
     
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