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6v single pole relay

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by mattdall, Mar 2, 2015.

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  1. mattdall

    mattdall

    6
    0
    Mar 2, 2015
    Hello lovely people, can you help me?

    I have a 9 v ldr circuit using a Darlington pair and I want a single pole 6v relay to power its own power source to run a motor, which will run an automaton.

    I have the relay clicking on when I cover the ldr...but don't know how to complete the circuit with motor and power source. Any help will be greatly received?
     
  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Pictures are worth a thousand words.
    What do you mean, power it's own powersource?
    Can you provide a block diagram or a point-list of what exactly you want for this circuit to do?
     
  3. mattdall

    mattdall

    6
    0
    Mar 2, 2015
    Thank you. I have a pic but my phone wont upload it? Ok..i have an ldr set up off a 9 v. This triggers the relay when I cover it. I want to run the automata off a separate power source, which the relay will start. I'm not sure how to wire the 3v separate battery source and motor into the circuit ? I'll try and upload a diagram to pc later...see if that'll upload to here?
     
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    That is a little clearer actually... let's see if I got this right.

    You have a 9V source and LDR which you want to use to trigger an automata that runs off a seperate 3V source. If this is the case, easy!
    The relay has two sides:

    -Coil Side : This is the side you energize to make the relay switch. There should only ever be 2 terminals for this.

    -Switch Side : This is the side that does the actual switching, and is not electrically connected* to the Coil Side. There can be anywhere from 2 to 6 terminals for this depending on the type of relay.

    For your project, you would simply use 2 of the Switch Side terminals. I will throw the technical term at you, if you have trouble let me know. If there are more than 2 terminals on the Switch Side, you want to use the 'Normally Open' pair. This pair will connect when you energize the Coil Side. (That click you hear ;))
    To determine which side is normally open, and normally closed, you can test with a multimeter. If there is continuity (a very low voltage) than the pins you are testing are normally closed. Now, you should power the relay Coil, and test the pins again. You should find that the normally closed pins are no longer connected and that one of those pins is now connected to another. This NEW pair is the normally open pair. Alternatively, if you share the part number of the relay, we may have a diagram we can look up.
    This new pair will function almost exactly like a normal switch, and can be put between the 3V power source and the Automata.


    *Always a good idea to look at the spec sheet for the relay, I have not yet seen a relay where the coil side is connected to the switch side internally, but I can't guarantee they don't exist! This could make wiring more interesting.
     
  5. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    With 9V available, you have enough voltage to switch a FET. This will not use power as a relay does, it will need a common earth rail though.

    What are your power supplies?
     
  6. mattdall

    mattdall

    6
    0
    Mar 2, 2015
    Thanks for you help...i,ll try what you've said
    I've not used that component, but am aware of it. I'm running a ldr circuit (9v) to turn on a relay to a separate 3v circuit, which runs a motor to an automata. Id like to use a relay so the kids can see how to build circuits from different inputs. Just not sure how to wire the motor and separate power from relay? Think I've got the relay the wrong way..got separate battery supply coming off the 2 pins..should it be attached the the 3 pin side? I know nc and no. Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Thank you for the pic!
    So the 3 pin side is the switching side. We need to use two of the three... specifically the two that will connect to themselves when you power the two pin side (coil).
    So. trial and error, or measure!

    Battery + to Motor +
    Motor - To Relay Pin X
    Battery - to Relay Pin Y

    If you have a part number on the relay I can tell you what pins to use... or you can just guess!
    There are only 3 possible combinations:
    -Accidentally use the output of the N/O and N/C pairs... Motor will not run.
    -Accidentally use the N/C pairs... Motor will run until LDR is covered.
    -Use the N/O pairs .. Motor will only run when LDR is covered.
    Polarity here does not matter.

    So use pins 1-2, then 2-3, then 1-3
    One of them will work as you desire!

    *Many relays have a small diagram on them... this shows how the pins are connected. does yours have this?
    N/O = Normally open. This will not conduct electricity until the relay is triggered.
    N/C = Normally closed. This will always conduct electricity until the relay is triggered.
     
  8. mattdall

    mattdall

    6
    0
    Mar 2, 2015
    Thank you..i will try this.
     
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