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6 volts what? Is 12 volts enough?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by meirman, Apr 5, 2004.

  1. meirman

    meirman Guest

    A friend gave me an external 56K modem without the adapter.

    It says 6V = , except the lower line of the = sign is dot dash dot.

    Does that mean 6V AC? Thanks.

    (It says Industry Canada / Industrie Canada. For a little more effort
    it could say 6V AC / 6V Currant Alternatent, or CA, or whatever it is
    in French.)

    ---

    Also, I have a 14 volt AC answering machine and a larger than average
    12 volt AC adapter. I think the odds are that that is enough to run
    the phone machine, yes??

    (I hate to ask a stupid question, but I just wanted to check a bit
    before I buy the unusual, very narrow with very narrow hole inside,
    expensive-for-such-a-little-thing connector at Radio Shack. I just
    don't have time now to take off the case and connect it with alligator
    clips.)


    Meirman

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  2. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    If the label on the back of the modem says 6 Volts, and you connect the 12
    Volt supply to it, the modem will most likely be instantly damaged. This is
    double the voltage!

    The lines " - - - ", or " = = = " indicate the operation is DC, and not
    AC going in to the modem. If you get a universal supply for the modem, take
    very close attention to the polarity, as well as the voltage. If you cross
    the polarity, you will also scrap the modem.

    As for your answering machine, if it is rated 14 Volts and you try to run it
    on 12 Volts, there is a chance that it may work properly. Just make sure
    that the supply is rated high enough in wattage (current) to take the load
    of the answering machine. If the design of the machine is critical that it
    has to have 14 VAC going in to it and the supply is 12 VAC, the only thing
    that can happen, is it may lack proper performance, or not work at all.

    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    =========================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    =========================================


    A friend gave me an external 56K modem without the adapter.

    It says 6V = , except the lower line of the = sign is dot dash dot.

    Does that mean 6V AC? Thanks.

    (It says Industry Canada / Industrie Canada. For a little more effort
    it could say 6V AC / 6V Currant Alternatent, or CA, or whatever it is
    in French.)

    ---

    Also, I have a 14 volt AC answering machine and a larger than average
    12 volt AC adapter. I think the odds are that that is enough to run
    the phone machine, yes??

    (I hate to ask a stupid question, but I just wanted to check a bit
    before I buy the unusual, very narrow with very narrow hole inside,
    expensive-for-such-a-little-thing connector at Radio Shack. I just
    don't have time now to take off the case and connect it with alligator
    clips.)


    Meirman

    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.

    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
     
  3. meirman

    meirman Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair on Mon, 5 Apr 2004 10:13:20 -0400 "Jerry G."
    Thanks for answering. I'm sorry. I was trying to indicate two
    different questions in the subject line, but it's not clear at all. I
    wouldn't use a 12V supply for a 6 volt item. I just can't tell if the
    input to this modem is supposed to be 6 Volts AC or 6 volts DC.
    But it's not quite either of these. It's one pair of lines. The upper
    line is a little longer than the top line of one = sign, and the lower
    line is the same total length but has three segements, equivalent to a
    dot, a dash, and a dot. I thought there was a sign something like
    this that meant AC output.
    It doesn't give any indication of what the polarity should be.
    (Unless it makes a difference which line of the = sign is one segment,
    and which is three.)

    It's a Diamond SupraExpress 56K external modem. But Diamond has been
    sold last fall to Best something (not Best Buys), according to their
    website, and there is limited support there now. I found the driver,
    but no instruction manual.

    It also doesn't say which of the two phone jacks is to the wall and
    which is to a phone, but either it doesn't matter or I can figure it
    out.
    Thanks. I'll try to let you know when I hook it up, after I find an
    adapter plug or something.

    Meirman

    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.

    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
     
  4. Ken Weitzel

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    I suspect that what you're calling dot dash dot is
    really intended to be a plus sign, while the
    dash line is trying to replicate a solid line for negative.

    IF I should be right, then I think that you'll find
    each of the lines ends with yet another symbol.

    One will most likely end with a . which will indicate
    the center pin.

    The other will end with a ( which indicates the outer
    shell. (think of it as part of the outer circle if you
    will)

    If you'd like a small pic of these, send me an email
    from the address you want it sent to.

    Take care.

    Ken
     
  5. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Guest

    does it look like this ? ______
    --------


    That Means AC

    - Mike
     
  6. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Guest

    The polarity, if indicated is usually shown with a sign that looks sort of
    like a c with a dash.. like this

    C- It will usually have an indicator of the outside being - and
    inside being +, but this is not always ture.

    - Mike
     
  7. meirman

    meirman Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair on Mon, 05 Apr 2004 20:22:16 GMT Ken Weitzel
    <> posted:


    My gosh, Ken, you're from Canada. The internet is fantastic!
    If they intend a plus sign, they only got the pieces and didn't
    assemble it. I'm not blind yet. :)
    That's not there.
    I should be sending you a pic, instead. But my other post this round
    describes it pretty well.

    After talking to all of you, so far I think it is AC. I will try to
    get to my box of old adapters and hope I have 6 volts ac**, unless you
    think I wouldn't damage it by connecting a 6 volt dc to it. (That I
    have as part of a universal DC adapator.

    **I should make a list and put it on the box instead of going through
    them all each time. :( I should also buy more used spares at
    hamfests, even when I don't need them.
    Thanks a lot.

    Meirman

    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.

    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
     
  8. meirman

    meirman Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair on Mon, 05 Apr 2004 22:10:20 GMT, you or
    Close, but the bottom line should be . _ .


    I should have tried harder to print it for you.

    The part after 6v is only one line high, no taller than the 6, but
    here I can draw it two lines high, like this:

    _____
    . _ .

    Inaccuracies above:
    The dots should be at the same height as the line between them.
    The lower line and dots are a bit thinner than the top line. That
    seems significant. ?

    I know what you mean by the C- but there is absolutely nothing like
    that. This may be why I got it so cheap. Or, maybe if it doesn't say
    polarity, it is supposed to use AC. Maybe . __ . in Canada is
    equivalent to -------.

    It might have even been burned out already, but I'm still going to
    try. This has come up before, not just with a modem, and I have to
    learn how to handle it. I'll try with an ohmmeter to figure out
    something.

    For this and future cases of this, which do you guys think is less
    likely to break it:
    to connect it to 6volts AC when it should have 6volts DC, or
    to connect it to 6volts DC when it should have 6volts DC?
    I think this one must be AC. Thanks a lot, to all of you.

    Meirman

    If emailing, please let me know whether
    or not you are posting the same letter.

    Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
     
  9. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    If the power source is intended to be AC, then connecting a DC adaptor
    will do no damage. It may even work, depending on the modem's design.
    For example, if the modem derives the +/-12V rails from a 5V Maxim
    RS232 chip, say, then a DC supply will be OK. OTOH, if an AC supply is
    required to produce both +/-12V rails, then the modem may power up but
    will not communicate with your serial port. You can test this by
    measuring the RS232 output pins. Some should sit at +12V, others at
    -12V.


    - Franc Zabkar
     
  10. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    What you describe *really* sounds like DC, generally AC is indicated by a
    sine wave, ie a wavy line, straight lines are DC. Whatever you do start out
    with DC, you can connect DC to an AC device without immediate damage, if you
    connect AC to a DC device however you will normally fry it.
     
  11. meirman

    meirman Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair on Tue, 06 Apr 2004 22:27:57 GMT "James
    This makes sense, now that you said it. :) I should have figured it
    out myself. Thanks.

    All who said the symbol was was dc were right. Thank you all. (If
    everyone would just learn to speak English, it would be a lot simpler.
    It's not so hard to do. I see little children who know English.



    Meirman

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    or not you are posting the same letter.

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