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5v to illuminated switch - help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by ChrisQ, Mar 31, 2011.

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  1. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

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    Mar 10, 2011
    I am modding another ATX power supply. I have not yet soldered the leads to fuses and on to the binding posts but I wired it up real quick to test it and I have power. However, this time I would prefer an illuminated switch.

    The switch must be wired to the green (+5v) and then to ground. I have temporarily wired the PSU with a basic switch and it works fine.

    My problem arises when attempting to wire up the illuminated rocker switch in the picture below. Not only does it not illuminate, but nothing happens at all. I am wondering if it would need to be wired to a 12v line since it's made for use in cars, and what I can do to make it work here.

    [​IMG]

    A secondary question: I added the big push button switch to my cart without bothering to figure out what "Momentary Action" means. I'd really like to use a bush button switch that will stay on or off but I am not finding them. If anyone has a link I would appreciate it.

    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, I presume you are switching the low voltage enable line with this switch and not the mains power, right?

    I'm not exactly sure if the thing to the left of the green/black/blue switch is part of it?

    Wiring this up is not going to be very useful if it is momentary contact, but this is what I would do:

    1) have the PSU turned on using whatever means you have now. Connect the lamp leads to 12V and Gnd and confirm the light goes on.

    2) remove the current switch and attach the momentary contact switch. FInd the combinations that turn the PSU on when the button is pressed.

    3) marvel at your success.

    4) take it all apart again and find a more appropriate switch.

    5) Start from (1) again.

    What you're looking for is a push-on/push-off switch. You will have to ensure that the lamp is appropriately rated and that (preferably) the lamp connections are totally separate from the switch contacts (as I have presumed they are in this case)
     
  3. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

    32
    0
    Mar 10, 2011
    Your assumption is correct. The green wire is the low voltage enable, not the main.

    Here is the basic layout so you have a better understanding. Credit goes to this guy:

    [​IMG]

    I figured it out. The big switch has 2 sets of connectors - one for the lights (I hooked up a 12v circuit) and one for the switch (I hooked up the green and ground). I worked fine except it's momentary not push/on push/off.

    So that leaves me with the rocker switch, which is what you could not identify in the first picture. Problem is, the rocker switch only has 2 connectors.

    It will not work when I attach to this contraption that came with it:

    [​IMG]

    However when I unplugged that and wired directly to the silver tabs, it works but does not illuminate. I also tried hooking up 12v to the contraption and the green to the silver tabs. The switch worked but still did not illuminate.

    [​IMG]


    I do not know why the rocker will not illuminate, so I will continue to search for an illuminated switch with 4 leads and push/on push/off capabilities.
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    It looks like there must be more than 2 connections on that switch.

    Try to determine which ones are the switch contacts and which are the lamp terminals. There's probably a way to make it work.

    That odd adapter looks like it would illuminate the switch when it's turned off and the light would go out when it is switched on.
     
  5. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

    32
    0
    Mar 10, 2011
    There is a spot labeled "3" where a 3rd prong should be but there is no 3rd prong. If there was, I believe I would go:
    #1-DC On
    #2-12v
    #3-Ground

    At least I learned something tonight. Off to radio shack tomorrow :)
     
  6. MattyMatt

    MattyMatt

    161
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    Mar 24, 2011
    As far as illuminated switches go, if they are meant for a car, they will run on 12-15 volts for the lamps, so defiantly use a 12V supply rail.

    The illuminated switches at radioshack should meet your specs... and most have the circuit diagram/ instructions on the back of the package. Most if not ALL are 3 pins, so green wire to 1 of them, ground to the other, then 12V power to the lamp.

    Random side note info: The green wire of an ATX supply (pin 15 on standard ATX MB Connector) has to be kept on.... when we use momentary switches in computer cases, its because the motherboard is actually doing the switching work.

    Matty-

    ***edit***: I may just do this project myself! I could use a good temporary bench supply, haven't really invested in one of those yet. :eek:
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2011
  7. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

    32
    0
    Mar 10, 2011
    Yeah when I bought that big switch I did not even pay attention to the description. I just envisioned a panel on the bridge of the Enterprise and it was added to my cart!

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

    32
    0
    Mar 10, 2011
    After work today I stopped by my local electronics shop and found an On/Off illuminated power switch that works great. Thanks for the help on this thread, and stay tuned for a few more as I stumble my way through electronics for dummies :)
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    And now the Star Trek reference becomes clear... (Sorry, hadn't actually spotted it before now)
     
  10. MattyMatt

    MattyMatt

    161
    0
    Mar 24, 2011
    Cool Beans man!

    Post a pic when its done... I'd be curious to see :)
     
  11. ChrisQ

    ChrisQ

    32
    0
    Mar 10, 2011
    Ok Matt, my digital voltage meter finally showed up from Hong Kong so I could drill out my faceplate, paint it, and put everything together. The power supply is mounted under the table, and although the box I built is almost as big as the PSU, it looks slightly better and doesn't have a fan screwed to it.

    [​IMG]

    At this point I only have plans for the variable voltage connector, but since I had all the wires I ran the 5v and 12v as well.

    From left to right: Potentiometer over the 2 prong connector, voltage readout, 5v, 12v. I would like to find a nice knob for the potentiometer.
    [​IMG]


    Since I will be using this to test the electronics and fixing light bleeding in the models that I am building, I put the power switch near the edge of the table so I don't have to reach around the model every time to turn it on and off. It looks slightly better in person but did not really achieve the Star Trek look. I would need a few big lights for that.
    Power switch, 2 LEDs (Power ready, Power on). The fan was actually spinning but the camera was too fast.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
  12. MattyMatt

    MattyMatt

    161
    0
    Mar 24, 2011
    I gotta say, it looks excellent, I like the breaking it into 2 parts thing as well! keep up the good work!

    Oh, and the DVM is a VERY nice touch, I have a few atx supplies kickin around, I may very well do that after I get my scope off my bench (that is... still workin on it!)
     
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