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1n400X complete datasheet

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by navid71, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. navid71

    navid71

    1
    0
    Feb 25, 2013
    hi everyone
    i searched in all of internet about datasheet of 1n400X diodes but I can't find my goal. i want high voltage & high frequency informations.
    please help me in short time.
    tnx
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
  3. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    The 1N4007 is 1000V, why go for less?
    The 1N4007 series is common and may be made by many manufactures so they may have different specifications. They do not seem to specify speed.

    The UF4007 is a high speed 1000V diode with specified switching time of 75ns.
     
  4. Diar

    Diar

    12
    1
    Jul 27, 2014
    So I've been trying to find datasheets for 1N4001 and 1N4148 diodes. I'm trying to figure out the forward current when the diode voltage is 0.65V on both the 1n4001 and 1n4148 but i either cant find the right datasheets, or I don't know how to read what datasheets I have found. Does anyone know where I might find them/the value I'm looking for.
     
  5. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    "I'm trying to figure out the forward current when the diode voltage is 0.65V"
    Basically you are working around the wrong way.
    Generally we want to know the forward voltage when the current is 20mA, 100mA, 700mA etc.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Whilst you can estimate the answer that question from a datasheet, the result will be "typical" and may vary significantly.

    Check figure 2 on this datasheet. My guess would be that it would be about 15mA. Note that it may differ for different manufacturer's diodes!
     
  7. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    Temperature will affect forward voltage and if this voltage is held constant, then the current will vary greatly. This effect is used to stabilise current in amplifiers.
     
  8. Diar

    Diar

    12
    1
    Jul 27, 2014
    It's for an assignment, we have built the circuit in multisim and plotted values of current and voltage through the diode depending on voltage from supply on to a graph. Then we are asked to work out the value of the current if the voltage is 0.65V from our graph and compare to datasheets.

    That's pretty much a similar datasheet to those I've found. I assume the values from 1N4001 to 1N4007 are similar enough to not require an individual datasheet for each?

    Can you show me how you are getting a value of 15mA of Fig 2? By my eye it looks closer to 22mA for a 0.65V, unless I'm reading it wrong.

    Thanks guys, I appreciate the help.
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Yeah, I'll go with 22mA, it could be a bit more.

    I read the graph wrong.

    diode.png
     
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