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16 Volt DC conversion to 12 Volt AC

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by definepi314, Aug 31, 2016.

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  1. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    I have a dc source of 16 volt, 0.49 amps. I want to design a circuit to convert it into 12 volt ac. Can anybody suggest?
     
  2. Minder

    Minder

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    Google LM317.
    M.
     
  3. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    LM317 is dc to dc converter.
     
  4. Minder

    Minder

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    Oops missed that, I see now it has been posted in other forums also.
    M.
     
  5. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

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    Aug 11, 2014
    Take a look at a 555 inverter circuit.
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

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    What do you wish to do with the AC generated?
    What frequency should the AC be?
    What waveform do you want?
    What power do you want?
     
    Arouse1973 likes this.
  7. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    Drive a tiny AC Motor(though the priority is generating the supply). Freq should be 50 Hz and Sine waveform. It would be nice if the current be same as dc source.
     
  8. duke37

    duke37

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    12V AC is 34V peak to peak so a transformer or an H bridge will be required.
    A square wave is easier to generate and the motor may well run OK on this.
    A DC motor would be the easiest way to go.
     
    HellasTechn likes this.
  9. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    duke37
    Choice of motor is fixed, I cannot use dc motor.
     
  10. TedA

    TedA

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    You could use a power oscillator driving a 50Hz step-up transformer.

    The oscillator might use an automotive audio power amplifier IC, or else a few discrete parts.

    The classic Bill and Dave in the garage oscillator topology is not hard to get working.

    You may have to wind your own transformer.

    A separate oscillator stage would provide a bit more stability.

    This approach will not be optimized for power efficiency or mass production unit cost. It will do what you say you want, but may not be best for your actual application.

    There are many more questions we might ask, such as:

    How many of these will be built.

    How much time and effort for design & debug are in your project budget?

    What test equipment is available for debugging?

    What components do you have in your junkbox that might be used for this project?

    Where do you purchase your electronic components?

    How small must it be?

    How efficient? Is there some minimum output power that must be provided?

    Can you settle for slightly less than 12VAC on the output? If 11VAC were enough, no transformer would be required in a (fairly) simple design.

    Does the motor require extra current to start running? ( LRA ratings?)

    Is the demand for 12VAC intermittent? Does the motor just run and run with a constant load, or is it starting and stopping, or running without load at times?

    Does the 16VDC supply have an internal impedance? Is there any need to minimize input ripple?

    Is the 16VDC supply highly regulated, or will it vary? How much might it vary?

    Do you need isolation between the DC input and the AC load? Or must they share a common ground?

    Are there EMI requirements to be met? Other regulatory considerations?

    The more we know, the better our suggestions are likely to be.

    Ted
     
  11. Minder

    Minder

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    There are a number of IC for producing 60hz etc, one is the ELM440, it uses a very common 3.8mhz colour TV
    The output can be simply amplified if necessary.
    Google elm440 and also AC generating IC.
    crystal .
    M.
     
  12. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    TedA
    Thank You for thoughtful suggestion.......I will definitely see if have the time and resources to try out your method. I know I haven't provided as many details as you wanted.

    Minder
    Don't you think maintaining frequency of 50 Hz would be a headache in it?

    P.S. Also isn't 555 timer ic a decent option? Has anyone worked with it to reproduce AC signals?
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    why ?
    it should be quite stable since it is crystal controlled
     
  14. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    davenn
    I'm talking about changing 60 Hz to 50 Hz. ELM440 outputs 60Hz and 1Hz only
     
  15. duke37

    duke37

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    I would use a gate in a CMOS 4093 and a resistor and capacitor to make an oscillator. Feed the signal into a cheap H bridge, there is one which will output 5V suitable for driving the 4093. Total cost about £3. (GBP)
    A 555 is a little more complicated but would do.

    This would be well worth trying if you are not too fussy about extreme frequency accuracy and if a square wave will not upset the motor.
     
    definepi314 likes this.
  16. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

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    @Duke Can you elaborate on this please?
    Wouldn't you need more than one gate to produce AC?
     
    definepi314 likes this.
  17. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014

    Attached Files:

    definepi314 likes this.
  18. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

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    definepi314 likes this.
  19. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I would generate a 50Hz sine wave and use a cheap class D amplifier to use it to drive the motor.

    At best you'll get a touch more than 11VRMS unless you drive the amplifier into clipping (which will distort the waveform to one with a higher RMS voltage).
     
  20. definepi314

    definepi314

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    Aug 31, 2016
    Steve, how would you generate 50 Hz sine wave from 16 Volt DC ?
     
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