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12V Battery on a 230V/50Hz Pump

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Teclics, Aug 15, 2015.

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  1. Teclics

    Teclics

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    Aug 15, 2015
    Hey guys,

    This is my first time posting here because i want to start applying my theoretical knowledge of electromagnetism ( I have a MSc. in physics ). You would be surprised by how little actual electronics we actually get taught.
    I plan on buying a pump for a pond and hooking it up to a battery (entire plan will probably be posted in the project section soonish). Now my question is: How do I hook it up? Do I need to buy and put an inverter in between and what is the efficiency of the conversion? Does the pump internally use a lower voltage DC current? If so, would it be better to hook up the battery more directly?

    My apologies if these question sound stupid, it is because my electric knowledge is only theoretical and not practical. I would be happy to explain the laws of Maxwell if anyone is interested ;)

    Cheers! Teclics
     
  2. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Many of the answers are under your control. If you buy a 12 V DC pump and use a 12 V DC battery, no conversion is necessary. If it is a 220 VAC pump, then you need an inverter. Figure 80% efficiency, so 20% of your battery power goes up in heat. Step 1, what are the water-moving requiements? Step 2, what pumps are available to you? Then the tradeoffs begin, battery size vs. run time vs. cost, etc.

    ak
     
  3. Teclics

    Teclics

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    Aug 15, 2015
    Hey AnalogKid,

    Thanks for the quick reply! Available pumps are all 220 VAC, but I assume (or guess) they run on lower voltage DC. Don't you think? Would it be possible to open up the pump and hack it such that the battery can be applied directly instead of going through an inverter twice?

    Cheers,

    Teclics
     
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    220vac pump is 220vac....no internal inverter as you claim.

    As far as hacking into a fully sealed pump, not a good idea by any means.
     
  5. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    There are plenty of 12V water pumps on ebay, both high and low pressure.
     
  6. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Absolutely not.
    Pond pumps for domestic use are designed for low voltage in the interests of safety. Mains voltage and water are not good companions. Surely Belgium has somewhere (a Garden Centre?) selling 12V pumps?
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    I have a pond and its pump runs on 120 VAC. No internal conversion to a lower voltage, which I know because I have disassembled a broken one.

    Bob
     
    Minder likes this.
  8. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    It depends on the size of the pond!
    For the larger ones, a mains pump with AC motor is often used and the motor itself is sealed and filled with dielectric (transformer) oil.
    M.
     
  9. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Mine is 1300 gallons. The pump is 500W, and pumps 3500 GPH. It would take 41A at 12V, which is a bit much.

    Bob
     
  10. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Yeah. Guess I was thinking of small ornamental ones :).
     
  11. z0d

    z0d

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    Aug 13, 2015
    Just wondering, if you use the 12V DC batt to power the 230VAC, wouldn't that drain your batt very quickly? Seems a bit counterproductive. But then again, I'm guessing you're just gonna use the pump for short periods of time.

    A related question that I have wouldn't you need a step-up transformer as well? Or do inverters come with it.
     
  12. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    An inverter generally takes a low DC voltage 12 to 48 and steps it up to line voltage 120 or 230.

    Bob
     
  13. Kiwi

    Kiwi

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    Jan 28, 2013
    Our goldfish pond has a low voltage 12vac pump. It came with a 230vac to 12vac transformer. Brand is Pondmaster.
    Easy to install. Being low voltage it doesn't need the cable to be installed to meet safety regulations. Transformer is in the garage and twin core cable runs around fences to pond.

    Why do you want to run your pump from a battery?

    How are you going to recharge the battery?

    You can buy 12vdc to 230vac inverters from automotive supply stores. We use them at work to run laptops in the field.
    They come in two types; pure sine wave, and the cheaper modified sine wave. Some devices don't run well on the modified sine wave inverters.
     
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