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100V DC/DC Converter

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Mike Blankenship, Feb 20, 2004.

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  1. I am looking for a DC/DC converter to boost the Voltage to 100V from a
    5 or 9 Volt input. I have found the following circuit which will do this :

    http://www.maxim-ic.com/appnotes.cfm/appnote_number/1751/ln/en

    But I am looking for a device in a DIP package. National has a couple of
    parts
    which will boost to 80Volts.

    mike
     
  2. No idea myself........but I am curious as to what type of application
    you are using this for.......if you dont mind...
     
  3. Im building a MegOhm meter and need to test at 100V
     
  4. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    You also need to declare the power requisites which you intend to
    feed. There are several types of converter for that voltage range,
    and they do not all perform the same in all load conditions.. of
    course... so, we need more info.
     
  5. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    Your best bet would be to make a small converter with variable
    output voltage. That way, you could always have the ability to
    calibrate the output voltage, instead of blindly relying on it to
    remain steady over time and temperature.

    Use a PWM, a couple of FETs, and make chopped output, or use a self
    resonant oscillator, pump a transformer, and rectify the output. Put
    a take off, and control loop in it, and you can adjust the voltage.
    If you are building the entire circuit, it isn't that hard to simply
    build a MVPS onto the system as well.

    Hell, a true RMS meter, a known low drift precise value bottom
    resistor, and the resistor under test are all you need. And the
    excitation voltage, of course. At that point, you could use AC to
    pump it from a variac, and use current to figure it, or voltage.

    Another thought is to use those old B+ batteries the old handheld
    radios and fluorescent lights used. They were like 67 volts. Two of
    those series together...

    Hehehe...
     
  6. My application only requires .700 amps. Since im using a voltage divder to
    test up to 1 Teraohm. I will need very little current from the supply
    wohoo I just received my test resistors today. 10G 100G 1T and 10Terahom .

    Dealing with the very low current wont be a problem, Im using a LMC6001 with
    a 25fa input bias current.
    This is a handheld device so board space is an issue. National Parts will
    only go to 80V with a simple
    single IC and 1 inductor solution. So Im still looking.
     
  7. My application only requires .700 amps. Since im using a voltage divder to
    test up to 1 Teraohm. I will need very little current from the supply
    wohoo I just received my test resistors today. 10G 100G 1T and 10Terahom .

    Dealing with the very low current wont be a problem, Im using a LMC6001 with
    a 25fa input bias current.
    This is a handheld device so board space is an issue. National Parts will
    only go to 80V with a simple
    single IC and 1 inductor solution. So Im still looking.
     
  8. DarkMatter

    DarkMatter Guest

    The ten Mohm will pass the most current, as you are aware.

    Perhaps a ranging switch, and several "bottom resistors" are needed
    to keep the test current relatively even in each range.
    Cool device.
    Resistors of that high a value may test at one value with a mere
    hundred volts, but at true HV levels, even mere breath or a
    fingerprint is enough to make them leak badly.

    Be sure to use gloves whenever handling any high value resistors,
    especially if their intended application is that of a feed back for an
    HV output. The dipped, glazed versions are less susceptible, but
    would still leak across their surfaces under high potentials. The
    non-coated raw ceramic substrate versions are VERY susceptible, and
    even absorb water and other media (hygroscopic).

    A good brominated solvent (EnSolv), or hot 99% IPA is a good thing
    to wash them with, just before the testing, and certainly before any
    potting steps..
     
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