Will an LCD TV be damaged by freezing?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Bill Jeffrey, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. Bill Jeffrey

    Bill Jeffrey Guest

    I am about to close up my cabin for the winter. The heat will be off,
    and the indoor temperature will drop well below freezing. Will my LCD
    TV be damaged by these temperatures? In other words, will the "liquid
    crystal" freeze and break something? I would be grateful for a link or
    pointer to an authoritative source.

    Thanks

    Bill
     
    Bill Jeffrey, Oct 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Bill Jeffrey

    Guest

    Wow - I never thought of that. My place does not go below freezing as
    long as the minimal heat is on. I hope someone really knows. Have you
    tried contacting the manufacturer?

    Bob Hofmann
     
    , Oct 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bill Jeffrey

    Guest

    ..... NO, NO, NO, NO.... NO DAMAGE
    the LCD "response time" will get sluggish but will come back to normal
    when it gets up to tempereature. I have shipped a lot of equipment
    back and forth to Alaska, North Dakota, Minnesota, etc in the dead of
    winter, when it comes out of the unheated delivery truck, or out of the
    overnight trunk in a car or van, it can be well below freezing and
    computer FANS groan and don't turn well, LCD monitors, LCD projectors
    don't display well, even handheld LCD calculators get very sluggish....
    just put one of your cheap calculators in the freezer overnight.... it
    will have to come up to near room temperature to work properly but it
    will not be damaged.... now if you submersed it in liquid nitrogen or
    something like that I think their could possibly be a problem.
    electrictym
    ...
     
    , Oct 22, 2005
    #3
  4. Bill Jeffrey

    Guest

    I accidentally froze a laptop computer once; I left it in my car
    overnight and we had a particularly cold snap. I realized what I'd done
    in the morniing and brought it inside, and noticed that the display
    looked very strange. This worried me, so I let it warm up until the
    condensation was gone and powered it up, and the display was completely
    black. I thought it was shot, but when I tried it again a few hours
    later everything was fine.

    I suspect you'd have to get an lcd really really cold to freeze it, and
    even then it might not harm it; few substances expand when frozen like
    water does.
     
    , Oct 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Bill Jeffrey

    James Sweet Guest

    Bill Jeffrey wrote:
    > I am about to close up my cabin for the winter. The heat will be off,
    > and the indoor temperature will drop well below freezing. Will my LCD
    > TV be damaged by these temperatures? In other words, will the "liquid
    > crystal" freeze and break something? I would be grateful for a link or
    > pointer to an authoritative source.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Bill




    It'll be fine, just warm the room up to something reasonable for several
    hours before turning the thing on to make sure any moisture that
    condenses in it goes away.
     
    James Sweet, Oct 23, 2005
    #5
  6. Bill Jeffrey

    Bill Jeffrey Guest

    Bill Jeffrey wrote:

    > I am about to close up my cabin for the winter. The heat will be off,
    > and the indoor temperature will drop well below freezing. Will my LCD
    > TV be damaged by these temperatures? In other words, will the "liquid
    > crystal" freeze and break something? I would be grateful for a link or
    > pointer to an authoritative source.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Bill

    Thanks for the inputs, everyone. I got the "official" answer from the
    mfr today. Storage conditions as low as -20C (-4F) are OK. Below that,
    no guarantee.

    Bill
     
    Bill Jeffrey, Oct 25, 2005
    #6
  7. Bill Jeffrey

    GregS Guest

    In article <0Wx7f.94667$>, Bill Jeffrey <> wrote:
    >Bill Jeffrey wrote:
    >
    >> I am about to close up my cabin for the winter. The heat will be off,
    >> and the indoor temperature will drop well below freezing. Will my LCD
    >> TV be damaged by these temperatures? In other words, will the "liquid
    >> crystal" freeze and break something? I would be grateful for a link or
    >> pointer to an authoritative source.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Bill

    >Thanks for the inputs, everyone. I got the "official" answer from the
    >mfr today. Storage conditions as low as -20C (-4F) are OK. Below that,
    >no guarantee.
    >
    >Bill


    Seems like the best people to ask are from car audio. There are probably more
    displays in the cold vehicles than anywhere else.

    greg
     
    GregS, Oct 26, 2005
    #7
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