Wallwarts

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Bob Tyrka, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. Bob Tyrka

    Bob Tyrka Guest

    I feel a bit stupid after reading "Anyone notice elitism..." by asking this
    question: Does it damage a wall wart transformer to leave it plugged in when
    not in use?
    Bob Tyrka, Jul 5, 2005
    #1
  2. Bob Tyrka

    Beachcomber Guest

    On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 16:27:34 +0100, =?UTF-8?B?UGFsaW5kcuKYu21l?=
    <> wrote:

    >Bob Tyrka wrote:
    >
    >> I feel a bit stupid after reading "Anyone notice elitism..." by asking this
    >> question: Does it damage a wall wart transformer to leave it plugged in when
    >> not in use?
    >>
    >>

    >No, not unless you keep hitting it with the hoover...
    >
    >--
    >Sue



    Wall Warts are built for continuous duty. Like any electronic
    equipment though, if they run hot (due to being overloaded, or
    whatever), the life will be shortened. Also, if you have a lot of
    lightning surges without any protection, you might lose one
    occasionally.

    Beachcomber
    Beachcomber, Jul 5, 2005
    #2
  3. "Bob Tyrka" <> wrote in message
    news:ERwye.8$...
    >I feel a bit stupid after reading "Anyone notice elitism..." by asking this
    >question: Does it damage a wall wart transformer to leave it plugged in
    >when not in use?
    >

    No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    they are not powering the associated equipment.

    Charles Perry P.E.
    Charles Perry, Jul 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Bob Tyrka

    Bob Tyrka Guest

    Thanks to all you good-humored and knowledgeable correspondents I won't have
    to lose any more sleep over those little monsters.

    "Charles Perry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Bob Tyrka" <> wrote in message
    > news:ERwye.8$...
    >>I feel a bit stupid after reading "Anyone notice elitism..." by asking
    >>this question: Does it damage a wall wart transformer to leave it plugged
    >>in when not in use?
    >>

    > No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    > they are not powering the associated equipment.
    >
    > Charles Perry P.E.
    >
    >
    >
    Bob Tyrka, Jul 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Bob Tyrka

    Guest

    On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:18:46 -0400, "Charles Perry"
    <> wrote:

    >No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    >they are not powering the associated equipment.


    Have you heard anything more about the estimate of the amount of
    energy wasted annually from wall warts?
    I know it was a big buzz a few years ago.
    , Jul 6, 2005
    #5
  6. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:18:46 -0400, "Charles Perry"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    >>they are not powering the associated equipment.

    >
    > Have you heard anything more about the estimate of the amount of
    > energy wasted annually from wall warts?
    > I know it was a big buzz a few years ago.


    Here is a figure from one source:

    Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs estimate that US households
    waste about $3.5 billion in electricity a year on power supply standby
    losses alone.

    Currently, the push by the EPA and CEC (California Energy Commission) is to
    improve the efficiency of power supplies in computers and other electronic
    devices (TVs, etc). They are horribly inefficient, particularly when
    lightly loaded (as they almost always are).

    Charles Perry P.E.
    Charles Perry, Jul 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Bob Tyrka

    Guest

    On Wed, 6 Jul 2005 08:50:41 -0400, "Charles Perry"
    <> wrote:

    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:18:46 -0400, "Charles Perry"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    >>>they are not powering the associated equipment.

    >>
    >> Have you heard anything more about the estimate of the amount of
    >> energy wasted annually from wall warts?
    >> I know it was a big buzz a few years ago.

    >
    >Here is a figure from one source:
    >
    > Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs estimate that US households
    >waste about $3.5 billion in electricity a year on power supply standby
    >losses alone.
    >
    >Currently, the push by the EPA and CEC (California Energy Commission) is to
    >improve the efficiency of power supplies in computers and other electronic
    >devices (TVs, etc). They are horribly inefficient, particularly when
    >lightly loaded (as they almost always are).
    >
    >Charles Perry P.E.
    >


    Thanks, I thought you would know.
    I am thinking the time may have come for a parallel low voltage system
    ion houses with some standardization in low voltage appliances so we
    only have a single, high efficiency supply, perhaps battery backed up.
    I know there are dozens of wall warts around my house for all the
    various things. I try to keep them unplugged or switched off when not
    in use but it doesn't always happen. There are 5 on this PC alone.
    , Jul 6, 2005
    #7
  8. Bob Tyrka

    SimonLW Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:18:46 -0400, "Charles Perry"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >No, but keep in mind that the do consume energy while plugged in, even if
    > >they are not powering the associated equipment.

    >
    > Have you heard anything more about the estimate of the amount of
    > energy wasted annually from wall warts?
    > I know it was a big buzz a few years ago.


    Depends on the unit, but one with 9v DC 300ma output unloaded I tested uses
    1 volt-amp. Another one used for recharging a hand vac doesn't even get the
    slightest bit warm unloaded. Probably less than a watt used when unloaded.
    Seems like a waste of time to even be concerned about the power drawn when
    not in use.
    -S
    SimonLW, Jul 6, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    writes:
    > Thanks, I thought you would know.
    > I am thinking the time may have come for a parallel low voltage system
    > ion houses with some standardization in low voltage appliances so we
    > only have a single, high efficiency supply, perhaps battery backed up.
    > I know there are dozens of wall warts around my house for all the
    > various things. I try to keep them unplugged or switched off when not
    > in use but it doesn't always happen. There are 5 on this PC alone.


    For PC-related things, I often grab the power for ancilliary
    devices from the PC's power supply. That works fine for some
    external disks, scanners, and ethernet hubs I've used, and it
    also means they go off when you switch the PC off. It's a
    non-starter for some external modems and printers though, as
    neither external power supply terminal is anywhere near 0V
    relative to the connection to the PC, so they have to have
    isolated power supplies.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    Andrew Gabriel, Jul 6, 2005
    #9

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