Ultrasonic cleaning for pipes?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Richard Rasker, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. Hi all,

    I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty deposits)
    by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the devil of a
    time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And cleaning up
    afterwards also took half an hour.

    This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic device.
    I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well with all
    sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the drains.
    I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more or less
    dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier would be a
    type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly clamped on to a
    pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be filled with
    water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water is exactly
    the problem with a blocked drain ;-)

    Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?

    Any ideas are appreciated.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl
     
    Richard Rasker, Mar 7, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Richard Rasker

    Frank Buss Guest

    Richard Rasker wrote:

    > Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    > would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    > less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?


    My dentist used an ultrasonic device for cleaning a tooth before the
    root canal therapy. You'll hear some high pitched scratching sound when
    the device touches the tooth, but I'm still alive. But maybe a high
    power ultrasonic generator for cleaning pipes will be more dangerous.

    --
    Frank Buss, http://www.frank-buss.de
    piano and more: http://www.youtube.com/user/frankbuss
     
    Frank Buss, Mar 7, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Richard Rasker

    Rich Webb Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 13:23:43 -0800 (PST), mpm <> wrote:

    >On Mar 7, 1:41 pm, Richard Rasker <> wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty deposits)
    >> by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the devil of a
    >> time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And cleaning up
    >> afterwards also took half an hour.
    >>
    >> This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic device.
    >> I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well with all
    >> sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the drains.
    >> I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more or less
    >> dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier would be a
    >> type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly clamped on to a
    >> pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be filled with
    >> water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water is exactly
    >> the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >>
    >> Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    >> would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    >> less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >>
    >> Any ideas are appreciated.
    >>
    >> Richard Rasker
    >> --http://www.linetec.nl

    >
    >Boiling HOT water.
    >Note: I am not a plumber, but that sure worked well on a stubborn tub
    >clog a few years back (after everything else failed).
    >
    >Takes a while... And several attempts.


    Just a caution: this works for most drains but should NOT be used for
    commodes, as there's a good chance of cracking the porcelain bowl or
    opening the floor seal.

    Had a similar issue last spring, except the blockage was in the combined
    drain line for the whole house. Sealing the tub overflow drain and then
    going hammer and tongs with one of those "turbo" plungers (looks like a
    bicycle pump) from the tub drain was needed to get enough flow to get
    the boiling water to the blockage to finish the cleaning. After that,
    though, so far it's been clear sailing (so to speak).

    --
    Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
     
    Rich Webb, Mar 7, 2011
    #3
  4. Richard Rasker

    Rich Grise Guest

    Richard Rasker wrote:
    >
    > I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty
    > deposits) by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the
    > devil of a time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And
    > cleaning up afterwards also took half an hour.
    >
    > This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic
    > device. I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well
    > with all sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the
    > drains. I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more
    > or less dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier
    > would be a type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly
    > clamped on to a pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be
    > filled with water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water
    > is exactly the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >
    > Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    > would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    > less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >

    Something like "industrial-strength" Liquid-Plumber?

    I wouldn't recommend hot water; that just melts the greasy crap enough to
    move it down the pipe far enough to cool and congeal again, even farther
    out of the reach of the dreaded snake.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Mar 7, 2011
    #4
  5. In article <il3kee$4do$-september.org>, Rich Grise wrote:
    >Richard Rasker wrote:
    >>
    >> I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty
    >> deposits) by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the
    >> devil of a time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And
    >> cleaning up afterwards also took half an hour.
    >>
    >> This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic
    >> device. I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well
    >> with all sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the
    >> drains. I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more
    >> or less dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier
    >> would be a type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly
    >> clamped on to a pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be
    >> filled with water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water
    >> is exactly the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >>
    >> Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    >> would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    >> less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >>

    >Something like "industrial-strength" Liquid-Plumber?
    >
    >I wouldn't recommend hot water; that just melts the greasy crap enough to
    >move it down the pipe far enough to cool and congeal again, even farther
    >out of the reach of the dreaded snake.


    As soon as you get things flowing at all, even if slowly, then:

    Should the clog be a biological grease or a combo of biological grease
    and hair, use strong KOH or NaOH. This means "Drano" or "Liquid Plumber"
    or lye or the like.

    Please heed the cautions on the containers of these strong chemicals.
    One thing to beware of is heating, especially if you use a solid form of
    strong chemical such as lye or "crystal Drano". Water with solid KOH or
    NaOH added to it can experience boiling, which can splash out harsh
    chemical in bad ways such as into your eyes. Even liquid strong alkali
    products are not perfectly safe from splashing due to heating effects.

    --
    - Don Klipstein ()
     
    Don Klipstein, Mar 7, 2011
    #5
  6. Richard Rasker

    Joerg Guest

    Rich Webb wrote:
    > On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 13:23:43 -0800 (PST), mpm <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Mar 7, 1:41 pm, Richard Rasker <> wrote:
    >>> Hi all,
    >>>
    >>> I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty deposits)
    >>> by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the devil of a
    >>> time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And cleaning up
    >>> afterwards also took half an hour.
    >>>
    >>> This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic device.
    >>> I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well with all
    >>> sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the drains.
    >>> I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more or less
    >>> dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier would be a
    >>> type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly clamped on to a
    >>> pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be filled with
    >>> water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water is exactly
    >>> the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    >>> would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    >>> less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >>>
    >>> Any ideas are appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Richard Rasker
    >>> --http://www.linetec.nl

    >> Boiling HOT water.
    >> Note: I am not a plumber, but that sure worked well on a stubborn tub
    >> clog a few years back (after everything else failed).
    >>
    >> Takes a while... And several attempts.

    >
    > Just a caution: this works for most drains but should NOT be used for
    > commodes, as there's a good chance of cracking the porcelain bowl or
    > opening the floor seal.
    >


    Same goes for clay sewage pipe, and sometimes one never knows what they
    used when building the house because it ain't visible unless you go in
    with a camera first.


    > Had a similar issue last spring, except the blockage was in the combined
    > drain line for the whole house. Sealing the tub overflow drain and then
    > going hammer and tongs with one of those "turbo" plungers (looks like a
    > bicycle pump) from the tub drain was needed to get enough flow to get
    > the boiling water to the blockage to finish the cleaning. After that,
    > though, so far it's been clear sailing (so to speak).
    >


    All this hot water and chemicals stuff can work but relief is often only
    temporary, and that's a reason why ultrasound may never really become
    popular: Roots that grew in through joint cracks, hard-caked deposits
    that even chemical can't thoroughly penetrate, calcified stuff, sticky
    things that li'l Joey threw in the toilet and flushed, and so on. That
    can require lots of power on the rotating blades.

    I remember the last clog where the plumber wheeled in a huge motorized
    snake. When he hit the obstruction you could hear the motor work real
    hard, and this motor was at least a one-horse deal.

    --
    Regards, Joerg

    http://www.analogconsultants.com/

    "gmail" domain blocked because of excessive spam.
    Use another domain or send PM.
     
    Joerg, Mar 7, 2011
    #6
  7. Greegor wrote:

    > I did see a TV ad for a gadget that hinted
    > at possibly being some form of ultrasonic
    > vibrator for attachment to sewer pipes.
    >
    > http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4893361.html


    Ah, yes, that's what I meant. But it would appear that there are no actual
    devices available at this moment -- none that I can find, at least. And if
    any are available, they probably don't do a very good job, otherwise it'd
    be standard equipment for any plumber by now.

    Richard Rasker
    --
    http://www.linetec.nl
     
    Richard Rasker, Mar 8, 2011
    #7
  8. Richard Rasker

    amdx Guest

    "Jim Thompson" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 15:29:10 -0800, Joerg <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > [snip]
    >>
    >>All this hot water and chemicals stuff can work but relief is often only
    >>temporary, and that's a reason why ultrasound may never really become
    >>popular: Roots that grew in through joint cracks, hard-caked deposits
    >>that even chemical can't thoroughly penetrate, calcified stuff, sticky
    >>things that li'l Joey threw in the toilet and flushed, and so on. That
    >>can require lots of power on the rotating blades.
    >>
    >>I remember the last clog where the plumber wheeled in a huge motorized
    >>snake. When he hit the obstruction you could hear the motor work real
    >>hard, and this motor was at least a one-horse deal.

    >
    > My worst ordeal was when a grandkid flushed a hard rubber ball down a
    > toilet drain. Stuck in the vertical in the wall.
    >
    > Fortunately plumber was able to come down from the roof via the vent
    > pipe, but still took quite awhile :-(
    >
    > ...Jim Thompson

    Seems as good a time as any to tell my plumbing story... again.

    Five or six years after I moved into this house the drains got slow.
    I tried the usual chemicals, even tried a small diameter twenty five foot
    hand held snake at the far end, through the washer drain. Didn't get
    much improvement. It became apparent I'd have to dig around the
    drain pipe, cut it and install a clean out, so I could use a real motorized
    rental snake. A weekend job I didn't want.
    I got a 3ft 1/4" steel rod and poked around in the yard until I located and
    marked out the drain line. I got my mind ready to dig a hole big enough
    so I could get around the pipe cut it and install the clean out.
    I removed 3 shovels of dirt and hit.... I can't believe it, I hit a
    cleanout!
    Yipee, Yahoo, I didn't know there was one. I broke out the brass cap and
    went to rent the auger. All is well. If I had started digging one foot
    farther
    from the house I would have missed the cleanout.
    I have the cleanout marked for the next time.
    Mikek
     
    amdx, Mar 8, 2011
    #8
  9. Richard Rasker

    Charlie E. Guest

    On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:24:40 -0700, Jim Thompson
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:47:05 -0500, Rich Webb
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 13:23:43 -0800 (PST), mpm <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Mar 7, 1:41 pm, Richard Rasker <> wrote:
    >>>> Hi all,
    >>>>
    >>>> I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty deposits)
    >>>> by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the devil of a
    >>>> time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And cleaning up
    >>>> afterwards also took half an hour.
    >>>>
    >>>> This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic device.
    >>>> I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well with all
    >>>> sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the drains.
    >>>> I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more or less
    >>>> dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier would be a
    >>>> type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly clamped on to a
    >>>> pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be filled with
    >>>> water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water is exactly
    >>>> the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >>>>
    >>>> Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    >>>> would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    >>>> less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any ideas are appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>> Richard Rasker
    >>>> --http://www.linetec.nl
    >>>
    >>>Boiling HOT water.
    >>>Note: I am not a plumber, but that sure worked well on a stubborn tub
    >>>clog a few years back (after everything else failed).
    >>>
    >>>Takes a while... And several attempts.

    >>
    >>Just a caution: this works for most drains but should NOT be used for
    >>commodes, as there's a good chance of cracking the porcelain bowl or
    >>opening the floor seal.
    >>
    >>Had a similar issue last spring, except the blockage was in the combined
    >>drain line for the whole house. Sealing the tub overflow drain and then
    >>going hammer and tongs with one of those "turbo" plungers (looks like a
    >>bicycle pump) from the tub drain was needed to get enough flow to get
    >>the boiling water to the blockage to finish the cleaning. After that,
    >>though, so far it's been clear sailing (so to speak).

    >
    >I'm fond of the "balloon" nozzle type. Screw this thingy on the end
    >of your garden hose. Turn on the water. The "balloon" inflates
    >tightly again the pipe wall, blocking back-flow and pressurizing the
    >blockage.
    >
    >For big drains, like going to the septic tank at my old house, they
    >had a RF-controlled robot gadget that cleared the drains. (Required
    >to sell to an FHA buyer of my house.)
    >
    > ...Jim Thompson


    Right after we moved in, my wife was taking a nice, LONG relaxing
    shower in our new 3/4 bath when I walked by, and noticed a lot of
    water on the floor. At first, I thought she had just left the shower
    door open a crack at the back, untill I glanced down and saw all the
    water flowing out from UNDER the toilet!

    Called the builder, and they agreed that there was a problem... :cool:

    They brought out an auger thingy, and went to the drain cap just
    outside the bath, and started digging, yes DIGGING! Seems that when
    the drains were put in, nobody was smart enough to cap the clean outs
    during the rest of the process, and had filled the drains with dirt
    and rocks. No hot water would had disturbed those! It took them over
    an hour with the auger to finally clear that junk out. They then took
    the auger up and down the street to clean out the rest of the dirt
    filled drain pipes!

    Charlie
     
    Charlie E., Mar 8, 2011
    #9
  10. On 03/09/11 12:16, Jim Thompson wrote:
    > On Tue, 8 Mar 2011 16:33:29 -0800 (PST), linnix
    > <-for.us> wrote:
    >>> He couldn't dodge me by bankruptcy because my lawyer traced his
    >>> funding to his father-in-law, one of the richest builders in Arizona.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Our HOA forced him in bankruptcy, but he was born again somewhere
    >> else. The problem is that there is no check and balance in the
    >> system. City inspector? What inspector? You mean the guy dinning
    >> with the builder?

    >
    > My builder tried to get me to agree to the State Registrar of
    > Contractors Board of Arbitration. You can guess what I told him ;-)
    >
    > ...Jim Thompson


    Messages like this make me glad I live in a less absolutely-capitalist
    society. Here in Australia we have a Housing Guarantee Fund, which is
    essentially 7-year building insurance cover which is mandatory for all
    works over (IIRC) $5K total value, and applies whether or not the
    original builder can be traced or made to fix the work. Like a statutory
    warrantee on all building work... it's effective.
     
    Clifford Heath, Mar 9, 2011
    #10
  11. Richard Rasker

    Charlie E. Guest

    On Tue, 8 Mar 2011 20:09:26 -0800 (PST), linnix
    <-for.us> wrote:

    >On Mar 8, 5:54 pm, Clifford Heath <> wrote:
    >> On 03/09/11 12:16, Jim Thompson wrote:
    >>
    >> > On Tue, 8 Mar 2011 16:33:29 -0800 (PST), linnix
    >> > <-for.us>  wrote:
    >> >>> He couldn't dodge me by bankruptcy because my lawyer traced his
    >> >>> funding to his father-in-law, one of the richest builders in Arizona.

    >>
    >> >> Our HOA forced him in bankruptcy, but he was born again somewhere
    >> >> else.  The problem is that there is no check and balance in the
    >> >> system.  City inspector?  What inspector?  You mean the guy dinning
    >> >> with the builder?

    >>
    >> > My builder tried to get me to agree to the State Registrar of
    >> > Contractors Board of Arbitration.  You can guess what I told him ;-)

    >>
    >> >                                          ...Jim Thompson

    >>
    >> Messages like this make me glad I live in a less absolutely-capitalist
    >> society. Here in Australia we have a Housing Guarantee Fund, which is
    >> essentially 7-year building insurance cover which is mandatory for all
    >> works over (IIRC) $5K total value, and applies whether or not the
    >> original builder can be traced or made to fix the work. Like a statutory
    >> warrantee on all building work... it's effective.

    >
    >Yes, we have that too. But no insurance can cover this stupid
    >plannings/actions. My house sits on top of a previous creek.
    >Flooding in several houses forced the builder into bankruptcy and the
    >builder's insurance to dig a 2 million dollars ditch in our backyard.
    >The insurance policy was max. out. This overshadowed our little
    >plumbing problems.
    >
    >Our neighbours still have flooding problems, but we are protected by
    >the underground ditch. Whom should they go after? The city planning
    >department for approving the original building plans? The insurance
    >company for wasting the money building the ditch to redirect the
    >problem? The engineering company for advising the insurance company?
    >Or the same engineering company who advised the original builder?
    >
    >The proper solution should have been tearing down my house to restore
    >the creek.


    Out in Borrego, where I almost built, they had a similiar problem.
    Homes had been there for decades, no flooding problems, then one year,
    there are major flooding problems. Traced the problem to one builder
    who had bulit up two lots in what used to be the flood channel,
    redirecting all the water into the street where it went it merry way
    until the first bend in the road...

    His homes had received all necessary instpections and permits, so he
    did do a thing. The others started putting in walls in front of their
    homes, so the problems would work its way down the street...

    Charlie
     
    Charlie E., Mar 9, 2011
    #11
  12. In article <4d7526f6$0$726$>,
    Richard Rasker <> wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > I just dealt with a clogged drain (washing machine sludge + fatty deposits)
    > by messing around with an auger for half an hour -- I had the devil of a
    > time getting the thing past some rather sharp bends. And cleaning up
    > afterwards also took half an hour.
    >
    > This made me wonder if there is a way to do this with an ultrasonic device.
    > I have an ultrasonic cleaning tank, and that works pretty well with all
    > sorts of caked dirt and grease, similar to what blocked the drains.
    > I'm thinking of a sort of high-power ultrasonic probe which more or less
    > dissolves the mess when it gets near the blockade; even handier would be a
    > type of ultrasonic transducer which could simply be firmly clamped on to a
    > pipe from the outside. The pipe of course would need to be filled with
    > water for this to work -- but having a pipe filled with water is exactly
    > the problem with a blocked drain ;-)
    >
    > Are things like this available? And if not, would the principle work? And
    > would any risk be involved with high-power ultrasonic vibrations in a
    > less-controlled environment than a special ultrasonic tank?
    >
    > Any ideas are appreciated.
    >
    > Richard Rasker


    Drain opening bladders do this, but they're more in the 40 to 200 Hz
    range. You put it on a hose, snake it down the pipe, then turn the
    water on. It expands sideways to form a seal, stretches, then buzzes
    violently as it releases water out the front. They work miracles on
    roofing and landscaping drains too.
    --
    I will not see posts from Google or e-mails from Yahoo because I must
    filter them as spam
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Mar 9, 2011
    #12
  13. Richard Rasker

    Rich Grise Guest

    Greegor wrote:

    > How about a sonic, subsonic or ultrasonic device to
    > prevent calcium/lime buildup which clogs water
    > heaters and forces them to need replacement?


    It wouldn't make any sense, since the crap that clogs
    water heaters precipitates loose, and simply piles up
    on the bottom or the tank.

    Hope This Helps!
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Mar 9, 2011
    #13
  14. Richard Rasker

    Charlie E. Guest

    On Wed, 09 Mar 2011 09:12:06 -0700, Jim Thompson
    <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 21:04:21 -0800, Charlie E. <>
    >wrote:


    >>Out in Borrego, where I almost built, they had a similiar problem.
    >>Homes had been there for decades, no flooding problems, then one year,
    >>there are major flooding problems. Traced the problem to one builder
    >>who had bulit up two lots in what used to be the flood channel,
    >>redirecting all the water into the street where it went it merry way
    >>until the first bend in the road...
    >>
    >>His homes had received all necessary instpections and permits, so he
    >>did do a thing. The others started putting in walls in front of their
    >>homes, so the problems would work its way down the street...
    >>
    >>Charlie

    >
    >I would have thought that Californica would be as exemplary as Arizona
    >with "flood plain" designations (no building or obstructions allowed).
    >
    >Plus development of parks that serve as flood drainage during heavy
    >rain.
    >
    >When I first moved to Arizona nearly 50 years ago, anyone who had too
    >many beers could block all east-west routes in Scottsdale. Take a
    >look at a Scottsdale terrain map sometime.
    >
    >Now street flooding is the exception... except for two water main
    >breaks this past week ;-)
    >
    > ...Jim Thompson


    Well, Borrego is literally out in the middle of nowhere, surrounded on
    all four sides by a huge state park. It is hard to get the county
    government to even acknowledge its existence, much less actually do
    anything for it. The drainage plan for the area has been in
    development for something like 20 years, but keeps being put on the
    back burner due to lack of interest in the county commission's budget.
    A few hundred people out in the sticks don't have much political
    clout!

    Funny thing is, they have the same problem here in Desert Hot Springs.
    Flood control and drainage plans have been on the drawing board for 10
    years, with a first draft due next year... for the past five years!
    :cool: The city can't do theirs until the county finishes, because we
    don't know where they will direct the water...

    Charlie
     
    Charlie E., Mar 15, 2011
    #14
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Andrea T.

    heat pipes

    Andrea T., Sep 4, 2003, in forum: Electronic Components
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    405
    Jeroen Vriesman
    Sep 6, 2003
  2. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    582
    Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\
    Apr 14, 2005
  3. Ken Smith

    Heat pipes

    Ken Smith, Sep 29, 2005, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    491
    Ken Smith
    Oct 1, 2005
  4. John Doe

    OT: CPU heatsink "heat pipes"

    John Doe, Jan 4, 2006, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    409
    Views:
    6,618
    David Maynard
    Jan 16, 2006
  5. Tim Marcus

    Grounding a non grounded outlet....cold water pipes?

    Tim Marcus, Feb 27, 2004, in forum: Electronic Repair
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    2,053
    w_tom
    Mar 1, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page