TV antenna rotor box not working

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Al, May 22, 2005.

  1. Al

    Al Guest

    One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    by the Genie company.)

    The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    long time to move after the dial was turned.

    Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.

    Any idea what the problem is?
    Al, May 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Al

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Al wrote:
    > One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    > by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    > by the Genie company.)
    >
    > The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    > long time to move after the dial was turned.
    >
    > Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    > dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.
    >
    > Any idea what the problem is?



    Hi...

    Clean and lubricate it?

    Ken
    Ken Weitzel, May 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. Al

    Jerry G. Guest

    Without knowing voltage readings, and having some type of reference to
    what is actualy supposed to be there, your question is very ambegious.

    It is very common that the motors, being exposed to all kinds of
    weather condtions, will eventauly fail after a number of years. It is
    also common that the power supply in the rotor unit can also be
    failing. There are a number of other control components involved as
    well.

    I would suggest you call in a service person who is familiar with this
    type of repair.

    Jerry G.
    ======
    Jerry G., May 22, 2005
    #3
  4. Al wrote:
    > One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    > by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    > by the Genie company.)
    >
    > The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    > long time to move after the dial was turned.
    >
    > Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    > dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.
    >
    > Any idea what the problem is?
    >

    Most likely the motor/gearbox on the roof would be the problem. The
    rotor box is just the power supply, switch and indicator of what
    direction the antenna is rotating. The indicator is pulsed around by a
    solenoid in the box receiving it's voltage from a cam switch in the
    motor/gearbox on the roof. If the indicator is not moving, the rotors
    not moving. Other possibility could be wire connections bad.
    John J.Turley, May 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Al

    Art Guest

    External roof mounted head end, interconnective wiring, interior control
    box. Any one of the three can cause problems. I suppose the item has been
    use for a fair length of time with no maintenance?? Head end probably needs
    to be disassembled, re-lubricated, and checked. Change the control cable
    from the control box to the head end, disasemble, clean and lubericate the
    control box mechanism also. Otherwise go out and buy a new system, including
    cable, and install it.
    "John J.Turley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Al wrote:
    >> One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    >> by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    >> by the Genie company.)
    >>
    >> The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    >> long time to move after the dial was turned.
    >>
    >> Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    >> dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.
    >>
    >> Any idea what the problem is?
    >>

    > Most likely the motor/gearbox on the roof would be the problem. The rotor
    > box is just the power supply, switch and indicator of what direction the
    > antenna is rotating. The indicator is pulsed around by a solenoid in the
    > box receiving it's voltage from a cam switch in the motor/gearbox on the
    > roof. If the indicator is not moving, the rotors not moving. Other
    > possibility could be wire connections bad.
    Art, May 22, 2005
    #5
  6. Al

    DaveM Guest

    "John J.Turley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Al wrote:
    >> One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    >> by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    >> by the Genie company.)
    >>
    >> The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    >> long time to move after the dial was turned.
    >>
    >> Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    >> dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.
    >>
    >> Any idea what the problem is?
    >>

    > Most likely the motor/gearbox on the roof would be the problem. The rotor
    > box is just the power supply, switch and indicator of what direction the
    > antenna is rotating. The indicator is pulsed around by a solenoid in the
    > box receiving it's voltage from a cam switch in the motor/gearbox on the
    > roof. If the indicator is not moving, the rotors not moving. Other
    > possibility could be wire connections bad.



    First thing to do is to check the voltage output of the transformer inside
    the control box. As memory serves, it should be around 24 VAC. If you
    don't have the proper transformer voltage while the rotor is in operation,
    I.E., trying to turn the antenna, look no further. You have a bad
    transformer. You might find a suitable replacement at a RadioShack store,
    if you can find one that still stocks parts.

    Next, check the contacts of the switch behind the dial, and also the
    solenoid switch contacts. If they're pitted or dirty, clean and burnish the
    contacts. Check to see if that fixed the problem.
    Next...
    Inside the control box is an AC capacitor that enables the motor in the
    rotor unit to be reversible. Don't know exactly which model you have, and
    the value of that capacitor may be different over the years of manufacture.
    Find and check the value of that capacitor, especially its ESR. If you
    don't have the equipment to do that, you might save yourself time and
    frustration by replacing it with a new one. These are usually AC
    electrolytics rated for motor run duty. Make sure your replacement is an AC
    capacitor. You can also use a metallized polypropylene capacitor with an AC
    rating of 100VAC or more (assuming that the operating voltage of the mtor is
    24VAC)..
    If that doesn't fix your problem, the next step is to get to the rotor unit
    and open it up. Check that the motor is not locked up from dried grease or
    rust. Could also be that one or more wires have broken. Make sure that
    the cable from the control box to the rotor is in good condition... all
    wires have continuity from the control box to the rotor.
    Cheers!!!
    --
    Dave M
    MasonDG44 at comcast dot net (Just subsitute the appropriate characters in
    the address)

    Never take a laxative and a sleeping pill at the same time!!
    DaveM, May 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Al

    none Guest

    On Sun, 22 May 2005 13:05:04 -0400, "DaveM"
    <> wrote:

    >"John J.Turley" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Al wrote:
    >>> One of our TV sets is linked to a roof-mounted antenna controlled
    >>> by one of those rotor boxes (ours is an Alliance brand, made
    >>> by the Genie company.)
    >>>
    >>> The rotor box began to malfunction a few weeks ago, taking a
    >>> long time to move after the dial was turned.
    >>>
    >>> Now it's gotten worse. It might move one click when you turn the
    >>> dial, but usually doesn't move at all. The dial face does light up.
    >>>
    >>> Any idea what the problem is?
    >>>

    >> Most likely the motor/gearbox on the roof would be the problem. The rotor
    >> box is just the power supply, switch and indicator of what direction the
    >> antenna is rotating. The indicator is pulsed around by a solenoid in the
    >> box receiving it's voltage from a cam switch in the motor/gearbox on the
    >> roof. If the indicator is not moving, the rotors not moving. Other
    >> possibility could be wire connections bad.

    >
    >
    >First thing to do is to check the voltage output of the transformer inside
    >the control box. As memory serves, it should be around 24 VAC. If you
    >don't have the proper transformer voltage while the rotor is in operation,
    >I.E., trying to turn the antenna, look no further. You have a bad
    >transformer. You might find a suitable replacement at a RadioShack store,
    >if you can find one that still stocks parts.
    >
    >Next, check the contacts of the switch behind the dial, and also the
    >solenoid switch contacts. If they're pitted or dirty, clean and burnish the
    >contacts. Check to see if that fixed the problem.
    >Next...
    >Inside the control box is an AC capacitor that enables the motor in the
    >rotor unit to be reversible. Don't know exactly which model you have, and
    >the value of that capacitor may be different over the years of manufacture.
    >Find and check the value of that capacitor, especially its ESR. If you
    >don't have the equipment to do that, you might save yourself time and
    >frustration by replacing it with a new one. These are usually AC
    >electrolytics rated for motor run duty. Make sure your replacement is an AC
    >capacitor. You can also use a metallized polypropylene capacitor with an AC
    >rating of 100VAC or more (assuming that the operating voltage of the mtor is
    >24VAC)..
    >If that doesn't fix your problem, the next step is to get to the rotor unit
    >and open it up. Check that the motor is not locked up from dried grease or
    >rust. Could also be that one or more wires have broken. Make sure that
    >the cable from the control box to the rotor is in good condition... all
    >wires have continuity from the control box to the rotor.
    >Cheers!!!


    There's actually some fellow on the web that services and sells
    Alliance brand rotors.
    I've picked his brain a time or two for the Aliance rotors I have and
    he gave me repair info freely, though it was 5 or 6 years back.

    Here's a few links:

    http://lists.contesting.com/pipermail/towertalk/1999-April/023693.html

    http://www.rotorservice.com/

    You can ask over at the first link, the Hammer's over there are only
    to happy to give you what info they have on these rotors.

    The second link will take you to Norm's rotor service, he has all the
    rights for Alliance brand rotors and can sell you any part you might
    need.

    I quite like my Alliance rotors, they seem to just run and run.
    My oldest is about 40 years old, the other about 30 or so.
    I have a tv antenna on one and have the other rigged up for a
    surveillance camera for my property. It's set about 50 ft. o so on the
    roof corner and gives me a birds eye view of all activity on my
    property.
    none, May 23, 2005
    #7
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