Transformer Help

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Jim Douglas, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked

    File:0326-3501-01
    I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA


    Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    find anything even close?

    Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    electronics store but they are closed today!

    Thanks!
     
    Jim Douglas, Jan 28, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jim Douglas

    John Fields Guest

    On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:39:45 GMT, Jim Douglas
    <> wrote:

    >I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    >plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked
    >
    >File:0326-3501-01
    >I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA
    >
    >
    >Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    >find anything even close?
    >
    >Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    >electronics store but they are closed today!


    That's not a transformer, it's a power supply with a 120VAC input
    and a 3.8VDC output which can supply 110mA into a 34.5 ohm load.
    (Your razor.)

    What does it look like and how does it connect to your razor?


    --
    JF
     
    John Fields, Jan 28, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    John Fields wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:39:45 GMT, Jim Douglas
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    >> plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked
    >>
    >> File:0326-3501-01
    >> I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA
    >>
    >>
    >> Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    >> find anything even close?
    >>
    >> Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    >> electronics store but they are closed today!

    >
    > That's not a transformer, it's a power supply with a 120VAC input
    > and a 3.8VDC output which can supply 110mA into a 34.5 ohm load.
    > (Your razor.)
    >
    > What does it look like and how does it connect to your razor?
    >
    >

    Looks like a transformer..1" square, red input wires(120v), black
    ,read out wires, there is nothing else, no diodes, etc...

    red input wires go into the top section, red/black come from bottom.

    It sits inside the recharger and it's only external parts is this
    "transformer" a resistor and a small led to indicate power..........
     
    Jim Douglas, Jan 29, 2007
    #3
  4. Jim Douglas

    John Fields Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 09:55:44 GMT, Jim Douglas
    <> wrote:

    >John Fields wrote:
    >> On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:39:45 GMT, Jim Douglas
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    >>> plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked
    >>>
    >>> File:0326-3501-01
    >>> I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    >>> find anything even close?
    >>>
    >>> Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    >>> electronics store but they are closed today!

    >>
    >> That's not a transformer, it's a power supply with a 120VAC input
    >> and a 3.8VDC output which can supply 110mA into a 34.5 ohm load.
    >> (Your razor.)
    >>
    >> What does it look like and how does it connect to your razor?
    >>
    >>

    >Looks like a transformer..1" square, red input wires(120v), black
    >,read out wires, there is nothing else, no diodes, etc...
    >
    >red input wires go into the top section, red/black come from bottom.
    >
    >It sits inside the recharger and it's only external parts is this
    >"transformer" a resistor and a small led to indicate power..........


    ---
    There has to be at least one diode in there, somewhere, in order to
    get the DC to charge the battery.

    My suggestion is to either get a replacement "transformer" from the
    manufacturer or to replace the charger.


    --
    JF
     
    John Fields, Jan 29, 2007
    #4
  5. Jim Douglas

    Jim Douglas Guest

    John Fields wrote:
    > On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 09:55:44 GMT, Jim Douglas
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> John Fields wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:39:45 GMT, Jim Douglas
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    >>>> plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked
    >>>>
    >>>> File:0326-3501-01
    >>>> I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    >>>> find anything even close?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    >>>> electronics store but they are closed today!
    >>> That's not a transformer, it's a power supply with a 120VAC input
    >>> and a 3.8VDC output which can supply 110mA into a 34.5 ohm load.
    >>> (Your razor.)
    >>>
    >>> What does it look like and how does it connect to your razor?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Looks like a transformer..1" square, red input wires(120v), black
    >> ,read out wires, there is nothing else, no diodes, etc...
    >>
    >> red input wires go into the top section, red/black come from bottom.
    >>
    >> It sits inside the recharger and it's only external parts is this
    >> "transformer" a resistor and a small led to indicate power..........

    >
    > ---
    > There has to be at least one diode in there, somewhere, in order to
    > get the DC to charge the battery.
    >
    > My suggestion is to either get a replacement "transformer" from the
    > manufacturer or to replace the charger.
    >
    >

    You were right under the tape around the windings on the red wire was
    one diode! Thanks for the time reading this, now I can find a
    "transformer" and add a diode to it.
     
    Jim Douglas, Jan 29, 2007
    #5
  6. Jim Douglas

    John Fields Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 23:51:16 GMT, Jim Douglas
    <> wrote:

    >John Fields wrote:
    >> On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 09:55:44 GMT, Jim Douglas
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> John Fields wrote:
    >>>> On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 15:39:45 GMT, Jim Douglas
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I am looking to replace a transformer for a rechargeable razor which was
    >>>>> plugged into 220V by accident, not me the kid. It's marked
    >>>>>
    >>>>> File:0326-3501-01
    >>>>> I/P 120V O/P 3.8V 110mA
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Gooogle showed little and searching Mouser and a couple of others didn't
    >>>>> find anything even close?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any help is appreciated. I still have to run to the local surplus
    >>>>> electronics store but they are closed today!
    >>>> That's not a transformer, it's a power supply with a 120VAC input
    >>>> and a 3.8VDC output which can supply 110mA into a 34.5 ohm load.
    >>>> (Your razor.)
    >>>>
    >>>> What does it look like and how does it connect to your razor?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Looks like a transformer..1" square, red input wires(120v), black
    >>> ,read out wires, there is nothing else, no diodes, etc...
    >>>
    >>> red input wires go into the top section, red/black come from bottom.
    >>>
    >>> It sits inside the recharger and it's only external parts is this
    >>> "transformer" a resistor and a small led to indicate power..........

    >>
    >> ---
    >> There has to be at least one diode in there, somewhere, in order to
    >> get the DC to charge the battery.
    >>
    >> My suggestion is to either get a replacement "transformer" from the
    >> manufacturer or to replace the charger.
    >>
    >>

    >You were right under the tape around the windings on the red wire was
    >one diode! Thanks for the time reading this, now I can find a
    >"transformer" and add a diode to it.


    ---
    Since your power supply states 3.8 VDC out and the diode will drop
    about 0.7V, your replacement transfomer's output voltage should be
    close to 3.2VRMS with a 110 mA load on it.

    Sounds like your razor's got three NiCds in series to run the motor
    and nearly a whole day to charge up after you've shorn yourself.



    --
    JF
     
    John Fields, Jan 30, 2007
    #6
  7. "Jim Douglas" <> wrote in message
    news:Awjvh.2606$RJ4.2217@trnddc08...

    > Looks like a transformer..1" square, red input wires(120v), black
    > ,read out wires, there is nothing else, no diodes, etc...
    >
    > red input wires go into the top section, red/black come from bottom.
    >
    > It sits inside the recharger and it's only external parts is this
    > "transformer" a resistor and a small led to indicate power..........


    One warning - I had a Remington like that and it used a capacitor in series
    with the primary to limit the voltage to the transformer. You'll almost
    certainly need to buy the correct part unless you are confident enough to
    try to cobble together something with a small audio transformer. In my case
    they only sold the charge module complete which ran about $10.

    --
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
     
    Homer J Simpson, Jan 30, 2007
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. SME

    Help:- Isolation Transformer 240 - 110V

    SME, Jul 1, 2004, in forum: Electronic Basics
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    653
    Don Kelly
    Jul 31, 2004
  2. Replies:
    45
    Views:
    2,755
    James Meyer
    Jan 3, 2004
  3. powerampfreak

    Using standard 50/60hz transformer as output transformer

    powerampfreak, Apr 1, 2007, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    1,546
    Michael A. Terrell
    Apr 6, 2007
  4. Cubus
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,173
    Don Kelly
    Jun 22, 2007
  5. MJHanagan

    Can a step-down transformer be used as a step-up transformer?

    MJHanagan, Apr 19, 2012, in forum: General Electronics Chat
    Replies:
    24
    Views:
    1,702
Loading...

Share This Page