torx, hex, star bits

Discussion in 'Electronic Equipment' started by Ting F. Chui, Oct 14, 2003.

  1. Ting F. Chui

    Ting F. Chui Guest

    What is the difference between a torx, a hex, and a star* bit?

    Thanks a lot,
    Ting
     
    Ting F. Chui, Oct 14, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Yanik Guest

    "Ting F. Chui" <> wrote in
    news:bmfd4p$9at$:

    > What is the difference between a torx, a hex, and a star* bit?
    >
    > Thanks a lot,
    > Ting
    >
    >
    >


    A hex has flat sides,the TorX has scallopped sides,don't know about a
    'Star*' bit.

    --
    Jim Yanik,NRA member
    jyanik-at-kua.net
     
    Jim Yanik, Oct 14, 2003
    #2
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  3. Ting F. Chui

    Robert Baer Guest

    "Ting F. Chui" wrote:
    >
    > What is the difference between a torx, a hex, and a star* bit?
    >
    > Thanks a lot,
    > Ting


    The Torx looks like a star, so that may be wheer that terminology came
    from. Otherwise, i have never heard of "star".
    There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    (if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    rare.
    Now there is a "tamper proof" version of the Torx and of the hex; in
    both the screw head has a pin in the middle, and the driver or wrench
    has a matching hole.
    And to complicate things, good 'ole IBM used screws to fasten the
    moniter case together on some of their products; the head *looks* like a
    tamper proof Torx, but is NOT.
    Ther are enough minor differences to make them totally incompatible;
    the IBM version could be labelled as "bastard in-house POS"; the edges
    are square instead of round, the tool taper is different, the pin size
    is different, and only the non-tamper proof drivers are available in
    strange places.
    There are yet other wierd screws and drivers out there, but they are
    almost never seen; since it did not seem you were looking for "wierdos",
    i have left them out.
     
    Robert Baer, Oct 14, 2003
    #3
  4. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Yanik Guest

    Robert Baer <> wrote in
    news::


    > There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    > (if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    > screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    > This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    > rare.


    Called Posi-drive,not really 'compatible' with Philips though.

    Tektronix used them until they switched to TorX.



    --
    Jim Yanik,NRA member
    jyanik-at-kua.net
     
    Jim Yanik, Oct 14, 2003
    #4
  5. Ting F. Chui

    Kevin Carney Guest

    I love posi-drive screwdrivers, they sure do grip a phillips head screw,
    even if it isn't a posi-drive philips screw

    --
    change .combo to .com for correct email

    ***************************************************
    "We ought always to know precisely why a given job
    is done in a particular way, and why it is done at
    all, and why it can't be done more efficiently,
    if it must be done at all."-- T.J.Watson

    ***************************************************

    "Jim Yanik" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns941478D8125C8jyanikkuanet@204.117.192.21...
    > Robert Baer <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >
    > > There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    > > (if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    > > screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    > > This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    > > rare.

    >
    > Called Posi-drive,not really 'compatible' with Philips though.
    >
    > Tektronix used them until they switched to TorX.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jim Yanik,NRA member
    > jyanik-at-kua.net
     
    Kevin Carney, Oct 14, 2003
    #5
  6. Ting F. Chui

    Fred Abse Guest

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 07:03:03 +0000, Robert Baer wrote:

    > There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    > (if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    > screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    > This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    > rare.


    Called "Pozidriv". The de facto standard in Europe and most of the Far
    East, where Phillips is almost nonexistent. The proper Pozidriv screws
    have a flatter bottom to the socket, and steeper sides, so the driver
    doesn't cam out as easily.

    Pozidriv screwdrivers are fine on Phillips screws, but Phillips drivers
    tend to wreck Pozidriv screws.

    Seen side by side, the Phillips screwdriver has a sharper point that the
    Pozi.

    There's also another type called "Supadriv". This is just a slightly
    redesigned Pozidriv, AFAIK to get around a patent. Supadriv works with
    Phillips and Pozi.

    Back sometime in the 1970s, Pozidriv (well, Stanley Tools, I think,
    actually), had an advertising campaign with the slogan "Non-Slip
    Screwdriving". For the first month or so it was "Non-Slip Screwing", until
    somebody told them :)

    As a rule of thumb, if it's UNF/UNC, it's Phillips, if it's metric, it;s
    Pozi.


    --
    Then there's duct tape ...
    (Garrison Keillor)
     
    Fred Abse, Oct 14, 2003
    #6
  7. Ting F. Chui

    John D. Farr Guest

    > > There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    > > (if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    > > screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    > > This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    > > rare.

    >
    > Called Posi-drive,not really 'compatible' with Philips though.
    >
    > Tektronix used them until they switched to TorX.
    >

    HP used Posidrive also. Another problem with Philips screws is the Japanese
    have a different standard than us for standard Philips. Its worth a trip to
    McMaster Carr's web page. They have an online catalog that lists the
    Japanese screwdrivers, Posidrive and many many others/

    John KC4ZXX
     
    John D. Farr, Oct 14, 2003
    #7
  8. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Adney Guest

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 00:26:32 +0000 (UTC) Jim Yanik <>
    wrote:

    >"Ting F. Chui" <> wrote in
    >news:bmfd4p$9at$:
    >
    >> What is the difference between a torx, a hex, and a star* bit?


    >A hex has flat sides,the TorX has scallopped sides,don't know about a
    >'Star*' bit.


    The Torx looks like a kind of star, but he may be asking about an
    older metric design which was called an XZN. I don't know of any
    actual bit called a Star.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney
    Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
    Jim Adney, Oct 15, 2003
    #8
  9. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Adney Guest

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 07:03:03 GMT Robert Baer
    <> wrote:

    > There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    >(if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    >screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    >This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    >rare.


    If you mean the Posidrive, then it's also a design belonging to the
    Phillips Screw Company. It's a good design and most modern "Phillips"
    head screws are actually Posidrive screws. They can be identified by
    the extra radial slash mark between each of the 4 "wings" of the
    Phillips broached depression in the screw head.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney
    Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
    Jim Adney, Oct 15, 2003
    #9
  10. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Yanik Guest

    Jim Adney <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 07:03:03 GMT Robert Baer
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> There is a screw-driver set that seems to be identical to the philips
    >>(if i remember right), but gives better holding power (driver holds
    >>screw in place with no mechanical extra help, and is almost slip proof).
    >>This variant seems to be compatible with the philips but seems a bit
    >>rare.

    >
    > If you mean the Posidrive, then it's also a design belonging to the
    > Phillips Screw Company. It's a good design and most modern "Phillips"
    > head screws are actually Posidrive screws. They can be identified by
    > the extra radial slash mark between each of the 4 "wings" of the
    > Phillips broached depression in the screw head.
    >
    > -
    > -----------------------------------------------
    > Jim Adney
    > Madison, WI 53711 USA
    > -----------------------------------------------
    >


    Another major difference is that Posidrive has parallel sides to each of
    it's driving surfaces,while Philips tapers.The parallel sides reduce
    camout.

    --
    Jim Yanik,NRA member
    jyanik-at-kua.net
     
    Jim Yanik, Oct 15, 2003
    #10
  11. Ting F. Chui

    Ed Price Guest

    "Jim Yanik" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9413D03A2F290jyanikkuanet@204.117.192.21...
    > "Ting F. Chui" <> wrote in
    > news:bmfd4p$9at$:
    >
    > > What is the difference between a torx, a hex, and a star* bit?
    > >
    > > Thanks a lot,
    > > Ting
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > A hex has flat sides,the TorX has scallopped sides,don't know about a
    > 'Star*' bit.
    >
    > --
    > Jim Yanik,NRA member
    > jyanik-at-kua.net



    There is a style, IIRC, called "serrated." It looks like about like a
    16-point Torx. It was popular in European cars in the 1960's for things like
    the brake backing plate bolts, typically in an 8mm size. Ask somebody who
    works on old VW's.

    Ed
     
    Ed Price, Oct 18, 2003
    #11
  12. Ting F. Chui

    Fred Abse Guest

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 03:57:05 -0700, Ed Price wrote:

    > There is a style, IIRC, called "serrated." It looks like about like a
    > 16-point Torx. It was popular in European cars in the 1960's for things
    > like the brake backing plate bolts, typically in an 8mm size. Ask somebody
    > who works on old VW's.


    On the subject of European cars, during the 1970s, Renault used a peculiar
    screw head called "TACL", with a bowtie shaped slot. I don't think they
    were ever used by anyone else.

    Trust the French :)

    --
    Then there's duct tape ...
    (Garrison Keillor)
     
    Fred Abse, Oct 19, 2003
    #12
  13. Fred Abse wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 03:57:05 -0700, Ed Price wrote:
    >
    > > There is a style, IIRC, called "serrated." It looks like about like a
    > > 16-point Torx. It was popular in European cars in the 1960's for things
    > > like the brake backing plate bolts, typically in an 8mm size. Ask somebody
    > > who works on old VW's.

    >
    > On the subject of European cars, during the 1970s, Renault used a peculiar
    > screw head called "TACL", with a bowtie shaped slot. I don't think they
    > were ever used by anyone else.
    >
    > Trust the French :)
    >
    > --
    > Then there's duct tape ...
    > (Garrison Keillor)
    >


    That sounds similar to those dammed "Clutch head" screws.
    --


    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
    Michael A. Terrell, Oct 20, 2003
    #13
  14. Ting F. Chui

    Jim Adney Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 13:29:47 +0100 "Fred Abse"
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 03:57:05 -0700, Ed Price wrote:
    >
    >> There is a style, IIRC, called "serrated." It looks like about like a
    >> 16-point Torx. It was popular in European cars in the 1960's for things
    >> like the brake backing plate bolts, typically in an 8mm size. Ask somebody
    >> who works on old VW's.

    >
    >On the subject of European cars, during the 1970s, Renault used a peculiar
    >screw head called "TACL", with a bowtie shaped slot. I don't think they
    >were ever used by anyone else.


    Is that similar to, or the same as, what we call a "clutch head?"

    >Trust the French :)


    Yes, we should be grateful that they make it so easy for us to make
    fun of them. ;-)

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney
    Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
    Jim Adney, Oct 20, 2003
    #14
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