Real difference between LR44 and SR44 button cells? Info please

Discussion in 'Electronic Components' started by Jax, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. Jax

    Jax Guest

    I bought a card full of approx forty assorted LR button cells marked
    "silver oxide" for a pound (not even two US dollars).

    I didn't expect much but to my sheer total astonishment they seemed
    to work quite well! So far.

    Then I got to thinking that maybe they will leak horribly when
    exhausted. So I figured I should see what the designation "LR"
    means. As you can see below, I am not much wiser!

    Can someone offer some real facts on the difference between LR and SR
    button cells.

    ---------------

    I have found lots of contradictory info on the web about the
    difference between LR44 and SR44 button cells. Or just LR and SR
    cells.

    (1) Some say that the LR44 is ALKALINE, others say it is SILVER
    OXIDE. Some same it is both!

    (2) Another says LR44 and SR44 are designations used by DIFFERENT
    MANUFACTURERS. For example: http://www.tic-toc.co.uk/chart.htm

    (3) Some say that a silver oxide cell has greater CAPACITY than the
    equivalent alkaline. http://www.sr44.com/

    (4) Others say that the silver oxide SELF-DISCHARGES quickly other
    say slowly. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/accbatcc.htm

    (5) Some refer to RATE OF DRAIN and say the silver oxide can take a
    heavy load. Others say the alkaline can deliver more.

    (6) One says that some SR44s are EQUIVALENT to type 357 but that some
    different SR44s are equivalent to type 303. Weird.
    See http://snipurl.com/lmcf

    (7) Most seem to say that the silver oxides deliver a constant
    voltage until they pack up whereas the alkalines deliver a declining
    voltage.

    All that truly confuses me now. Oh dear! What of the above is true?

    -------------------
    Jax, Jan 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jax

    mc Guest

    As I recall, LR44 is alkaline and SR44 is silver oxide. Silver oxide gives
    a more constant voltage.

    357 is like SR44 but with lower internal resistance. Some Olympus cameras
    are much happier with 357 than with SR44.
    mc, Jan 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jax

    mc Guest

    > I have found lots of contradictory info on the web about the
    > difference between LR44 and SR44 button cells. Or just LR and SR
    > cells.
    >
    > (1) Some say that the LR44 is ALKALINE, others say it is SILVER
    > OXIDE. Some same it is both!


    It is alkaline. A lot of people are confused nowadays.

    > (2) Another says LR44 and SR44 are designations used by DIFFERENT
    > MANUFACTURERS. For example: http://www.tic-toc.co.uk/chart.htm


    No, they are the same mfr., alkaline and silver oxide respectively. At
    least that was the case when I was researching camera batteries about 5
    years ago.

    > (3) Some say that a silver oxide cell has greater CAPACITY than the
    > equivalent alkaline. http://www.sr44.com/


    Depends on the load current, probably.

    > (4) Others say that the silver oxide SELF-DISCHARGES quickly other
    > say slowly. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/accbatcc.htm


    Slowly.

    > (5) Some refer to RATE OF DRAIN and say the silver oxide can take a
    > heavy load. Others say the alkaline can deliver more.


    Hard to say unless quantified. Also depends on whether you are willing for
    the voltage to drop as the battery gets used up. Alkaline drops a lot more
    than silver oxide.

    > (6) One says that some SR44s are EQUIVALENT to type 357 but that some
    > different SR44s are equivalent to type 303. Weird.
    > See http://snipurl.com/lmcf


    When I looked into it, 357 was an SR44 with lower internal resistance than
    an MS76, which is also supposedly equivalent to SR44. Olympus cameras tend
    to prefer 357 to MS76. (OM-2S and OM-4T SLRs, that is.)

    > (7) Most seem to say that the silver oxides deliver a constant
    > voltage until they pack up whereas the alkalines deliver a declining
    > voltage.


    Right.
    mc, Jan 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Jax

    Guest

    Re: Real difference between LR44 and SR44 button cells? Info please

    MC:

    Do you have a source for your information? I was very happy to learn
    that what I had guessed was apparently correct, but would like to
    read/learn more.

    H. R.(Bob) Hofmann
    , Jan 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Jax

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    Re: Real difference between LR44 and SR44 button cells? Info please

    On 16 Jan 2006 15:31:38 -0800, put finger to
    keyboard and composed:

    >MC:
    >
    >Do you have a source for your information? I was very happy to learn
    >that what I had guessed was apparently correct, but would like to
    >read/learn more.
    >
    >H. R.(Bob) Hofmann


    http://www.maxell.co.jp/e/products/industrial/battery/sr/index.html
    http://www.maxell.co.jp/e/products/industrial/battery/lr/index.html

    - Franc Zabkar
    --
    Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.
    Franc Zabkar, Jan 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Jax

    Peter Duck Guest

    In message <974DB36CB75F6628D1@204.153.244.156>
    Jax <> wrote:

    > I bought a card full of approx forty assorted LR button cells marked
    > "silver oxide" for a pound (not even two US dollars).


    > I didn't expect much but to my sheer total astonishment they seemed
    > to work quite well! So far.


    > Then I got to thinking that maybe they will leak horribly when
    > exhausted. So I figured I should see what the designation "LR"
    > means. As you can see below, I am not much wiser!


    > Can someone offer some real facts on the difference between LR and SR
    > button cells. <snip>


    I don't believe that answers relating to major/reputable brands would be
    of much relevance to the '40-ish for a pound' Chinese ones from
    market-stalls, etc.
    I've used them for some years, from cards with various obscure makers'
    names and a motley collection of sizes and type-designations, but have
    always taken the word 'silver' (or an SR or AG prefix) 'with a pinch of
    salt'.

    That said, they're certainly good value for money: occasional cells
    'dead on arrival' (and with external corrosion) apart, they've lasted
    pretty well and have never later leaked.
    Certainly, IMO, fine for anything but an expensive analogue watch which
    one doesn't wish to take the back off more frequently than essential
    (risk of dust/dirt) ...

    --
    Peter Duck <>
    Peter Duck, Jan 18, 2006
    #6
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