Re: running a 220V motor with 110V

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by SQLit, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. SQLit

    SQLit Guest

    "Ignoramus21510" <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote in message
    news:clb8b2$nf$...
    > Here's an OT question. I just won a 230V AirStar 50 military surplus
    > compressor in a military auction. This is a super bad ass 50 gal
    > compressor with a $7,790 list price, with two 230V motors driving it,
    > air dryer and purifier etc. It is used in large dental offices.
    >
    > I won it for many, many times less than the list price and will
    > probably end up selling it, although there is a chance that I will
    > keep it.
    >
    > My question pertains to testing this unit. Can I hope that if I plug
    > it into 110V, that the motors wil be running, although at obviously
    > greatly reduced efficiency?
    >
    > I do have 220V service in our home, but not an outlet near the
    > compressor. I could run a wire, but it is a PITA.
    >
    > If your answer is negative, then I will plug the compressor into my
    > 4KW generator, which has 220V outlets. It would be more of a hassle,
    > though.
    >
    > i


    Your kidding right? Would you try and run your central air conditioner on
    120v?


    With out knowing the size of the motors on the compressor, your generator
    is probably way to small to start 2-220v motors at the same time.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    SQLit, Oct 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. SQLit

    Me Guest

    In article <clbcb2$fis$>,
    Ignoramus21510 <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Oct 2004 09:19:31 -0700, SQLit <> wrote:
    > >
    > > "Ignoramus21510" <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote in message
    > > news:clb8b2$nf$...
    > >> Here's an OT question. I just won a 230V AirStar 50 military surplus
    > >> compressor in a military auction. This is a super bad ass 50 gal
    > >> compressor with a $7,790 list price, with two 230V motors driving it,
    > >> air dryer and purifier etc. It is used in large dental offices.
    > >>
    > >> I won it for many, many times less than the list price and will
    > >> probably end up selling it, although there is a chance that I will
    > >> keep it.
    > >>
    > >> My question pertains to testing this unit. Can I hope that if I plug
    > >> it into 110V, that the motors wil be running, although at obviously
    > >> greatly reduced efficiency?
    > >>
    > >> I do have 220V service in our home, but not an outlet near the
    > >> compressor. I could run a wire, but it is a PITA.
    > >>
    > >> If your answer is negative, then I will plug the compressor into my
    > >> 4KW generator, which has 220V outlets. It would be more of a hassle,
    > >> though.
    > >>
    > >> i

    > >
    > > Your kidding right? Would you try and run your central air conditioner on
    > > 120v?

    >
    > I have no illusion that the motors will run well. The question is,
    > will they turn at all and is 110V going to damage them. I simply want
    > to try them.
    >
    > >
    > > With out knowing the size of the motors on the compressor, your generator
    > > is probably way to small to start 2-220v motors at the same time.

    >
    > The power of the motors is 3 HP combined (1.5 Hp each). That's
    > 2.25KW. My generator is 4KW rated.
    >
    > i
    >
    > >
    > > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > > Version: 6.0.775 / Virus Database: 522 - Release Date: 10/8/2004
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    > --


    Nope, your ot going to get the 230Vac motors to even look like they are
    going to run at 120Vac. Bad Idea.....Use your genset.

    Me
     
    Me, Oct 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. SQLit

    Bas Guest

    >
    > Forgot to say. There is a reason for having two motors on the compressor
    > instead of one. I suspect that it is done so that they do not both start
    > at exactly the same moment when the compressor is turned on. Instead,
    > they are probably started at some interval of a few seconds.
    >
    > i


    How much for a transformer?

    Bas
     
    Bas, Oct 22, 2004
    #3
  4. SQLit

    Guest

    On 22 Oct 2004 16:48:58 GMT, Ignoramus21510
    <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote:

    >Pictures of the compressor are at
    >
    >http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/compressor/



    OK, not so "bad assed" a compressor as you made it sound. Those are
    likely dual voltage motors, being only 1.5HP each.

    The 4KW alternator will run them both, particularly if they stagger
    start.
     
    , Oct 22, 2004
    #4
  5. SQLit

    Eric Tonks Guest

    It is hard to imagine why one would use two motors. Since a compressor is a
    heavy load to start (unlike a table saw that starts under no load and then
    is loaded when it is running) it unlikely that one motor could start it if
    it needs 2 motors to run it (although, possibly the valves stay open on the
    compressor until it is at full speed, then it would load up and need 2
    motors).

    "Ignoramus21510" <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote in message
    news:clbefi$m2n$...
    > On 22 Oct 2004 16:48:58 GMT, Ignoramus21510

    <ignoramus21510@NOSPAM.21510.invalid> wrote:
    > > Pictures of the compressor are at
    > >
    > > http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/compressor/

    >
    >
    > Forgot to say. There is a reason for having two motors on the
    > compressor instead of one. I suspect that it is done so that they do
    > not both start at exactly the same moment when the compressor is
    > turned on. Instead, they are probably started at some interval of a
    > few seconds.
    >
    > i
     
    Eric Tonks, Oct 23, 2004
    #5
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