Photos of my homemade TIG torch cooler

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Ignoramus26745, Nov 3, 2005.

  1. Ignoramus26745, Nov 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. Ignoramus26745

    Mawdeeb Guest

    Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    > I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    > soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    > provided.
    >
    > Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >
    > The story is here:
    >
    > http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >
    >

    You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    are not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate
    then short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice
    for that particular application.

    Just a heads up.

    Jim Vrzal
    Holiday,Fl.
     
    Mawdeeb, Nov 3, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 09:15:22 GMT, Mawdeeb <> wrote:
    > Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >> provided.
    >>
    >> Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>
    >> The story is here:
    >>
    >> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>
    >>

    > You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    > are not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate
    > then short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice
    > for that particular application.


    Jim, would you say that a 30A rated relay would deteriorate when
    powering a 1/3 HP motor? If that is the case, I can replace it with a
    coil relay, I have many of them.

    i
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Winfield Hill, Nov 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Ignoramus26745

    Guest

    , Nov 3, 2005
    #5
  6. On 3 Nov 2005 04:41:41 -0800, Winfield Hill <> wrote:
    > Ignoramus26745 wrote...
    >>
    >>Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/

    >
    > Hey, were you planning on cleaning that thing up a bit?
    > What a filthy mess. Sheesh!


    I _did_ a very serious cleanup of this welder. :)

    You should have seen it before I vacuumed it. It had solid layers of
    compressed dust, dead insects, cobwebs, and who knows what else.

    The dirt that remains is stuff that is resistant to vacuuming and
    somewhat resistant to scraping. I do not want to use too much force
    there.

    i
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Ignoramus12686 wrote...
    >
    > The dirt that remains is stuff that is resistant to vacuuming
    > and somewhat resistant to scraping. I do not want to use too
    > much force there.


    Nothing wrong soap, water and a brush in selected areas.


    --
    Thanks,
    - Win
     
    Winfield Hill, Nov 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Ignoramus26745

    Jon Elson Guest

    Ignoramus26745 wrote:

    >I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >provided.
    >
    >Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >
    >The story is here:
    >
    >http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Hey, I thought you said a couple of weeks ago that it did NOT have HF.
    Obviously, in the lower left corner of the pics of the welder's innards,
    is the HF section. Maybe you meant it wasn't working, I don't know.
    I have to say the inside of my Lincoln Square-Wave TIG 300 is a lot more
    organized than the Hobart. There is VERY little wiring in the main
    welder section other than the main power cables. All the circuit boards
    and interconnect wiring is in an enclosed space behind the control panel.
    I'm almost amazed the Hobart works at all with all the control wiring
    hanging out near the main power circuitry. (I do notice a big shield
    between the HF and the control boards. By the way, you may be
    breaking the shielding with your new wires for the cooler. They go
    right by the HF section, then up near the control boards. I would not
    route them that way.)

    Your cooler looks pretty good. I wonder, however, if you get into
    serious TIGing, if the heat will build up. I was pretty surprised at how
    hot the cooler got on my TIG system after some steel welding. (Actually,
    it probably gets hotter on Aluminum with AC, but I am still learning the
    techniques there, so I weld for a moment and then look at the part a lot.)
    I have a Miller cooler with a big fan-cooled heat exchanger on it. The
    exchanger gets hot, and the water in the tank eventually gets pretty warm,
    too.

    Jon
     
    Jon Elson, Nov 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Ignoramus26745

    Jon Elson Guest

    Mawdeeb wrote:

    > Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >
    >> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >> provided.
    >> Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >> The story is here:
    >>
    >> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>
    >>

    > You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    > are not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate
    > then short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice
    > for that particular application.


    Well, I've been using an SSR on my air compressor motor (2 Hp, 240 V)
    for several
    years now without any problem. I did select a 40 A SSR for a motor
    drawing a
    nominal 11 A to provide a good margin for the starting surge.

    Jon
     
    Jon Elson, Nov 3, 2005
    #9
  10. Ignoramus26745

    Chris Jones Guest

    Jon Elson wrote:

    >
    >
    > Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >
    >>I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>provided.
    >>
    >>Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>
    >>The story is here:
    >>
    >>http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Hey, I thought you said a couple of weeks ago that it did NOT have HF.
    > Obviously, in the lower left corner of the pics of the welder's innards,
    > is the HF section. Maybe you meant it wasn't working, I don't know.
    > I have to say the inside of my Lincoln Square-Wave TIG 300 is a lot more
    > organized than the Hobart. There is VERY little wiring in the main
    > welder section other than the main power cables. All the circuit boards
    > and interconnect wiring is in an enclosed space behind the control panel.
    > I'm almost amazed the Hobart works at all with all the control wiring
    > hanging out near the main power circuitry. (I do notice a big shield
    > between the HF and the control boards. By the way, you may be
    > breaking the shielding with your new wires for the cooler. They go
    > right by the HF section, then up near the control boards. I would not
    > route them that way.)

    I agree: I would not run any wires into that bottom box (with the HF) if at
    all possible, and if I really did need to run wires into that box, I would
    keep them clipped to the metal wall so as to be as far as possible from the
    HF coils, and to minimise the flux flowing in the loop between the wire and
    the metal wall. Certainly don't try putting any of your new circuitry into
    that box with the HF. I think the top box looks more promising as a place
    for the new circuitry. By the way, you could water-cool the IGBTs, that
    works really well as long as you put a safety thermal switch to shut things
    down if the water stops. The method I prefer is a slab of copper busbar
    maybe 3 inches wide, quarter inch thick and as long as needed to bolt down
    all the IGBTs. First drill and tap it for the IGBTs, mounting holes etc.
    whilst it's still hard copper and easy to tap. Then use silver solder (not
    soft solder but the sort that melts when it is almost red hot) to attach a
    zig-zag of maybe quarter inch diameter copper pipe to the back of the
    busbar, trying not to get solder into the holes you tapped before. Make
    sure that the copper pipe fits well to the back of the busbar before
    starting to solder it. I would also recommend making the ends of the
    copper pipe long enough so that they protrude outside the welder and there
    are no joints in the plumbing inside the welder casing. This way, if you
    make the pipes slope downward, then if the joints in the pipework should
    leak, the water will stay out of the wiring. You can get rid of several kW
    with this sort of water cooling.

    Chris

    >

    [...]
     
    Chris Jones, Nov 3, 2005
    #10
  11. On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 16:08:14 -0600, Jon Elson <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >
    >>I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>provided.
    >>
    >>Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>
    >>The story is here:
    >>
    >>http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Hey, I thought you said a couple of weeks ago that it did NOT have HF.


    I probably said that it was not working (which was true). I fixed it
    and it is working. I regapped the spark gap also and had to rewire HF
    to make it work (the welder was wired for a remote HF device)

    > Obviously, in the lower left corner of the pics of the welder's innards,
    > is the HF section. Maybe you meant it wasn't working, I don't know.
    > I have to say the inside of my Lincoln Square-Wave TIG 300 is a lot more
    > organized than the Hobart. There is VERY little wiring in the main
    > welder section other than the main power cables. All the circuit boards
    > and interconnect wiring is in an enclosed space behind the control panel.
    > I'm almost amazed the Hobart works at all with all the control wiring
    > hanging out near the main power circuitry.


    There is a big shield, it shields it.

    > (I do notice a big shield
    > between the HF and the control boards. By the way, you may be
    > breaking the shielding with your new wires for the cooler. They go
    > right by the HF section, then up near the control boards. I would not
    > route them that way.)


    I am open to suggestions here. Maybe I should twist them?

    > Your cooler looks pretty good. I wonder, however, if you get into
    > serious TIGing, if the heat will build up.



    People in sci.engr.joining.welding group say not to worry. They say
    that under the worst of the worst imaginable garage welding, the water
    would barely get warm.

    Worst case, I have many "condenser coils" at home (12x10 inches or so)
    that I could use with a fan, but I see no point now. More possible
    points of failure.


    > I was pretty surprised at how
    > hot the cooler got on my TIG system after some steel welding. (Actually,
    > it probably gets hotter on Aluminum with AC, but I am still learning the
    > techniques there, so I weld for a moment and then look at the part a lot.)
    > I have a Miller cooler with a big fan-cooled heat exchanger on it. The
    > exchanger gets hot, and the water in the tank eventually gets pretty warm,
    > too.


    I dunno, I do not have the experience to back up my opinions (but I
    have plenty of opinions). As I said, it is a no brainer to add a
    condenser coil with a fan, I have all the parts already.

    i

    --
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 3, 2005
    #11
  12. On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 16:09:56 -0600, Jon Elson <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Mawdeeb wrote:
    >
    >> Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >>
    >>> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>> provided.
    >>> Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>> The story is here:
    >>>
    >>> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>>
    >>>

    >> You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    >> are not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate
    >> then short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice
    >> for that particular application.

    >
    > Well, I've been using an SSR on my air compressor motor (2 Hp, 240
    > V) for several years now without any problem. I did select a 40 A
    > SSR for a motor drawing a nominal 11 A to provide a good margin for
    > the starting surge.


    It my case, it is a 30A relay driving a 2A 1/3 HP motor.

    i
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 3, 2005
    #12
  13. Ignoramus26745

    Greg O Guest

    "Mawdeeb" <> wrote in message
    news:Kykaf.2519$bb3.1540@trnddc02...
    > Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >> provided. Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder. The
    >> story is here:
    >>
    >> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>
    >>

    > You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They are
    > not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate then
    > short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice for that
    > particular application.
    >
    > Just a heads up.
    >
    > Jim Vrzal
    > Holiday,Fl.



    I don't know about that. I used to service equipment that used solid start
    relays for a 1 HP motor, thousands of cycles a month. Around twenty or so
    machines. In five years I never replaced one. With the number of cycles Iggy
    will run his tig, it will probably outlive him!
    Greg
     
    Greg O, Nov 4, 2005
    #13
  14. Ignoramus26745

    Jim Stewart Guest

    Greg O wrote:

    > "Mawdeeb" <> wrote in message
    > news:Kykaf.2519$bb3.1540@trnddc02...
    >
    >>Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >>
    >>>I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>>soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>>provided. Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder. The
    >>>story is here:
    >>>
    >>>http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They are
    >>not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate then
    >>short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice for that
    >>particular application.
    >>
    >>Just a heads up.
    >>
    >>Jim Vrzal
    >>Holiday,Fl.

    >
    >
    >
    > I don't know about that. I used to service equipment that used solid start
    > relays for a 1 HP motor, thousands of cycles a month. Around twenty or so
    > machines. In five years I never replaced one. With the number of cycles Iggy
    > will run his tig, it will probably outlive him!


    Likewise, I designed a machine that fired a
    huge 120vac solenoid with a SSR. We built
    and shipped hundreds and I can't remember
    ever hearing of one fail.
     
    Jim Stewart, Nov 4, 2005
    #14
  15. Ignoramus26745

    acrobat ants Guest

    On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 16:08:14 -0600, Jon Elson
    <> wrote:


    >
    >Your cooler looks pretty good. I wonder, however, if you get into
    >serious TIGing, if the heat will build up. I was pretty surprised at how
    >hot the cooler got on my TIG system after some steel welding. (Actually,
    >it probably gets hotter on Aluminum with AC, but I am still learning the
    >techniques there, so I weld for a moment and then look at the part a lot.)
    >I have a Miller cooler with a big fan-cooled heat exchanger on it. The
    >exchanger gets hot, and the water in the tank eventually gets pretty warm,
    >too.
    >
    >Jon


    note on the cooler getting hot;
    don't know how much coolant does the miller cooler holds and why it
    gets hot, but one thing for sure the new miller 250 TIGs we used at
    school the fan does not come on untill the coolant get hot enough.
    it may even have some sort of flow control as well, because the sight
    glass with the red star in it was barely spinning at 90-120amp welding

    it has been said many times by guys here, a 5 gallon bucket or ever 4
    gallon will never get hot enough (not even remotely) under normal
    use.

    I asked the same question back when I built mine and Ernie L. and the
    other well known gurus confirmed it.
    NO heat exchanger needed. unless you are blasting 300Amp continuosly.
     
    acrobat ants, Nov 4, 2005
    #15
  16. Ignoramus26745

    Glen Walpert Guest

    On 3 Nov 2005 06:09:35 -0800, Winfield Hill
    <> wrote:

    >Ignoramus12686 wrote...
    >>
    >> The dirt that remains is stuff that is resistant to vacuuming
    >> and somewhat resistant to scraping. I do not want to use too
    >> much force there.

    >
    > Nothing wrong soap, water and a brush in selected areas.


    Or wipe down with solvent dampened rags. Paint thinner is a suitable
    solvent if used sparingly in a well-ventilated area and allowed to dry
    thoroughly before lighting off the welder. Disconnect from power
    first.

    Way OT story about wiping down with solvent dampened rags (not for the
    squeamish):

    Some years ago I worked with an electrical estimator who had been an
    electrician with a large contractor for 20 years or so, and I asked
    him why he quit the field work for the office job. Instead of
    answering he uncharacteristically went off into a story of a routine
    job at some North Jersey factory with the usual loop-fed 3-section
    medium voltage switchboard, where two utility feeds enter the end
    sections, each of which will connect to half of the plant load and/or
    to the center section, which can feed either half of the load. Either
    feed is adequate for both loads so any one section can be de-energized
    completely without losing power to either half of the load.

    This switchboard was indoors but well ventilated with polluted plant
    air, so it needed to have its buss bars wiped down with solvent
    dampened rags once a year, or the dirt would cake on so thick that the
    buss bars would overheat. The estimator's crew was sent out to do
    this rather trivial job with several experienced electricians and a
    brand new apprentice, first day on the job. Nice kid, everyone liked
    him, and when lunch rolled around and the kid had brought his lunch
    and didn't have money for the restaurant they all wanted to go to
    since he hadn't been paid yet. They offered to buy, but he would not
    accept and stayed behind while they went to lunch.

    When they returned they could not find the apprentice at first, but
    the last of the buss bar in the first section had been cleaned, and
    the door to the next section was open. His on the job training had
    not gotten to the section lockout procedure yet. They found him on
    the floor, solvent dampened rag in hand, unconscious but breathing,
    footprints running up the wall behind him nearly to the ceiling. They
    rushed him to a hospital where some of the crew saw him the next day,
    "swollen to 3 times normal size and skin turned black" was their
    possibly exaggerated impression. He said he knew he was dying, and
    they gave him the "hang in there you can make it" speech, but he died
    three days later.
     
    Glen Walpert, Nov 4, 2005
    #16
  17. On Thu, 3 Nov 2005 18:07:56 -0600, Greg O <> wrote:
    > "Mawdeeb" <> wrote in message
    > news:Kykaf.2519$bb3.1540@trnddc02...
    >> Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >>> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>> provided. Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder. The
    >>> story is here:
    >>>
    >>> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>>
    >>>

    >> You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They are
    >> not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate then
    >> short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice for that
    >> particular application.
    >>
    >> Just a heads up.
    >>
    >> Jim Vrzal
    >> Holiday,Fl.

    >
    >
    > I don't know about that. I used to service equipment that used solid start
    > relays for a 1 HP motor, thousands of cycles a month. Around twenty or so
    > machines. In five years I never replaced one. With the number of cycles Iggy
    > will run his tig, it will probably outlive him!


    I would like to clarify this issue. Perhaps dI/dt spikes that result
    in high voltage for an inductive motor, could have some bearing
    here. I suppose that the issue is less in a zero crossing relay.

    i
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 4, 2005
    #17
  18. On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 00:51:44 GMT, Glen Walpert <> wrote:
    > On 3 Nov 2005 06:09:35 -0800, Winfield Hill
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Ignoramus12686 wrote...
    >>>
    >>> The dirt that remains is stuff that is resistant to vacuuming
    >>> and somewhat resistant to scraping. I do not want to use too
    >>> much force there.

    >>
    >> Nothing wrong soap, water and a brush in selected areas.

    >
    > Or wipe down with solvent dampened rags. Paint thinner is a suitable
    > solvent if used sparingly in a well-ventilated area and allowed to dry
    > thoroughly before lighting off the welder. Disconnect from power
    > first.


    I may try to clean it just a little bit, but I would rather leave it a
    little dirty inside than break circuits etc.

    > Way OT story about wiping down with solvent dampened rags (not for the
    > squeamish):
    >
    > Some years ago I worked with an electrical estimator who had been an
    > electrician with a large contractor for 20 years or so, and I asked
    > him why he quit the field work for the office job. Instead of
    > answering he uncharacteristically went off into a story of a routine
    > job at some North Jersey factory with the usual loop-fed 3-section
    > medium voltage switchboard, where two utility feeds enter the end
    > sections, each of which will connect to half of the plant load and/or
    > to the center section, which can feed either half of the load. Either
    > feed is adequate for both loads so any one section can be de-energized
    > completely without losing power to either half of the load.
    >
    > This switchboard was indoors but well ventilated with polluted plant
    > air, so it needed to have its buss bars wiped down with solvent
    > dampened rags once a year, or the dirt would cake on so thick that the
    > buss bars would overheat. The estimator's crew was sent out to do
    > this rather trivial job with several experienced electricians and a
    > brand new apprentice, first day on the job. Nice kid, everyone liked
    > him, and when lunch rolled around and the kid had brought his lunch
    > and didn't have money for the restaurant they all wanted to go to
    > since he hadn't been paid yet. They offered to buy, but he would not
    > accept and stayed behind while they went to lunch.
    >
    > When they returned they could not find the apprentice at first, but
    > the last of the buss bar in the first section had been cleaned, and
    > the door to the next section was open. His on the job training had
    > not gotten to the section lockout procedure yet. They found him on
    > the floor, solvent dampened rag in hand, unconscious but breathing,
    > footprints running up the wall behind him nearly to the ceiling. They
    > rushed him to a hospital where some of the crew saw him the next day,
    > "swollen to 3 times normal size and skin turned black" was their
    > possibly exaggerated impression. He said he knew he was dying, and
    > they gave him the "hang in there you can make it" speech, but he died
    > three days later.


    scary stuff... I once had a collision of my car with a moving train...

    i
     
    Ignoramus12686, Nov 4, 2005
    #18
  19. Ignoramus26745

    Mawdeeb Guest

    Ignoramus12686 wrote:
    > On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 09:15:22 GMT, Mawdeeb <> wrote:
    >
    >>Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >>
    >>>I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>>soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>>provided.
    >>>
    >>>Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder.
    >>>
    >>>The story is here:
    >>>
    >>>http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    >>are not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate
    >>then short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice
    >>for that particular application.

    >
    >
    > Jim, would you say that a 30A rated relay would deteriorate when
    > powering a 1/3 HP motor? If that is the case, I can replace it with a
    > coil relay, I have many of them.
    >
    > i
    >

    The driving part is not the problem. The problem starts when you turn
    off the the motor and the electromagnet field collapses. It sends a
    voltage spike back thru the SSR and slowly eats away at the electronics.
    At my work place we went through a learning curve on this when we used
    SSR's to control several large contactors for 3 phase power.

    Your particular application maybe so over engineered that you may not
    see problems. But if things get out of control that would be the first
    place I would look.

    Jim Vrzal
    Holiday,Fl.
     
    Mawdeeb, Nov 4, 2005
    #19
  20. Ignoramus26745

    billh Guest

    "Ignoramus12686" <ignoramus12686@NOSPAM.12686.invalid> wrote in message
    news:Iqyaf.12045$...
    > On Thu, 3 Nov 2005 18:07:56 -0600, Greg O <> wrote:
    >> "Mawdeeb" <> wrote in message
    >> news:Kykaf.2519$bb3.1540@trnddc02...
    >>> Ignoramus26745 wrote:
    >>>> I made a homemade TIG torch cooler, from a used carbonator pump from
    >>>> soda fountains. Pictures of the pump, solid state relay, etc, are
    >>>> provided. Also provided are pictures of the innards of my welder. The
    >>>> story is here:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Welding/09-Homemade-TIG-Torch-Cooler/
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> You may get a problem later on with using that solid state relay. They
    >>> are
    >>> not designed for motor inductive loads. It will slowly deteriorate then
    >>> short to on condition. A 24v coil relay would be a better choice for
    >>> that
    >>> particular application.
    >>>
    >>> Just a heads up.
    >>>
    >>> Jim Vrzal
    >>> Holiday,Fl.

    >>
    >>
    >> I don't know about that. I used to service equipment that used solid
    >> start
    >> relays for a 1 HP motor, thousands of cycles a month. Around twenty or so
    >> machines. In five years I never replaced one. With the number of cycles
    >> Iggy
    >> will run his tig, it will probably outlive him!

    >
    > I would like to clarify this issue. Perhaps dI/dt spikes that result
    > in high voltage for an inductive motor, could have some bearing
    > here. I suppose that the issue is less in a zero crossing relay.
    >
    > i
    >


    A SSR should have a series R-C snubber across it to reduce the voltage
    spikes. Some of the SSRs have this built into them I believe. The
    application note for the device will probably have recommended values.
    Usually they are in the region of roughly 50-100ohms and a 0.1uf capacitor.
    Snubbers across mechanical relay contacts aren't a bad idea either if they
    are switching significant current.
    Zero-crossing SSRs are best suited to resistive loads. IIRC, if the voltage
    and current are out of phase such that enough current is flowing when the
    voltage across the triac is zero they won't turn off.

    billh
     
    billh, Nov 4, 2005
    #20
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