MONITOR: Connector Pins Broken (How do I Repair?)

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by drake, Jul 28, 2003.

  1. drake

    drake Guest

    Hi,

    I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.

    4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.

    Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these?

    I've looked around, and it seems the only way to salvage the monitor
    is to either replace the
    cable or the connector... both ways involve a lot of work. (But if
    this is the only way, I will do it.
    Will the small wires inside the cable have identifying coloured
    insulation... or will I have
    to use a multimeter? Is there any link to a site describing how to
    rewire a new connector?)

    Dumb Idea: Can I replace the pins in the connector by clipped paper
    pins of same dimension/size?
    Which I'll solder (or superglue) to keep in position? It seems this
    should work fine... but it seems
    too easy... what is the catch?

    Your comments/advice will be appreciated.

    TIA,

    Drake Lars
    drake, Jul 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. (drake) writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.
    >
    > 4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    > fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.


    > Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these?


    Are you sure they are broken? The 4 pins you mention should not be
    critical to basic monitor operation. Perhaps, there is something
    else wrong with it.

    6
    1 Red (Analog) 6 Red Return 11 (ID0) GND (Color) 11. . . 1
    2 Green (Analog) 7 Green Return 12 (ID1) NC (Color) . . .
    3 Blue (Analog) 8 Blue Return 13 Horizontal Sync . . .
    4 Reserved 9 No Connect 14 Vertical Sync . . .
    5 Ground 10 Ground 15 No Connect . . .
    15 10 5
    or
    6
    1 Red (Analog) 6 Red Return 11 Monitor ID0 (opt.) 11. . . 1
    2 Green (Analog) 7 Green Return 12 Data (SDA) . . .
    3 Blue (Analog) 8 Blue Return 13 Horizontal Sync . . .
    4 Reserved 9 +5 VDC (frm host)* 14 Vertical Sync . . .
    5 Return 10 Sync return 15 Data clock (SCL)* . . .
    15 10 5
    depending on how old it is.

    > I've looked around, and it seems the only way to salvage the monitor
    > is to either replace the cable or the connector... both ways involve
    > a lot of work. (But if this is the only way, I will do it.


    If there is indeed a pin problem, that's about the only way to
    deal with it. You can't really get at the inners of the connector itself
    usually because it is potted.

    > Will the small wires inside the cable have identifying coloured
    > insulation... or will I have > to use a multimeter? Is there any
    > link to a site describing how to rewire a new connector?)


    No standard, you'll have to use a multimeter.

    > Dumb Idea: Can I replace the pins in the connector by clipped paper
    > pins of same dimension/size?
    > Which I'll solder (or superglue) to keep in position? It seems this
    > should work fine... but it seems
    > too easy... what is the catch?


    Not way to assure a reliable attachment. And, then if a piece of the
    clip gets stuck in your video card connector, no way to get it out.

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: The email address in this message header may no longer work. To
    contact me, please use the Feedback Form at repairfaq.org. Thanks.
    Sam Goldwasser, Jul 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. drake

    Jerry G. Guest

    Not all the pins are used, but if your broken pins are necessary, then
    the complete connector or cable harness must be changed.

    If you are not skilled and equipped for this type of work I would
    suggest you give it to a service centre to put on a new connector for
    you. It is a difficult repair for someone who is not experienced with
    this type of work. If you cross some of the wires, make a short, or
    make a cold solder connection while doing this, it will not be a good
    situation.

    This would not be a very expensive repair when done by a service centre.

    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    ==============================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    Instruments http://www.zoom-one.com/glgtech.htm
    ==============================================
    "drake" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    Hi,

    I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.

    4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.

    Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these?

    I've looked around, and it seems the only way to salvage the monitor
    is to either replace the
    cable or the connector... both ways involve a lot of work. (But if
    this is the only way, I will do it.
    Will the small wires inside the cable have identifying coloured
    insulation... or will I have
    to use a multimeter? Is there any link to a site describing how to
    rewire a new connector?)

    Dumb Idea: Can I replace the pins in the connector by clipped paper
    pins of same dimension/size?
    Which I'll solder (or superglue) to keep in position? It seems this
    should work fine... but it seems
    too easy... what is the catch?

    Your comments/advice will be appreciated.

    TIA,

    Drake Lars
    Jerry G., Jul 28, 2003
    #3
  4. drake

    Quadrajet1 Guest

    << Hi,

    I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.

    4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.

    Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these? >>

    Don't worry, the pins are not "broken" but were probably never put in in the
    first place. It worked that way since it was new, no reason why it shouldn't
    keep working.

    Seeing how it's a no-name 14" monitor, just trash it and get a good one.
    Quadrajet1, Jul 28, 2003
    #4
  5. drake

    Dave D Guest

    "Jerry G." <> wrote in message
    news:bg3p94$a3l$...
    > Not all the pins are used, but if your broken pins are necessary, then
    > the complete connector or cable harness must be changed.
    >
    > If you are not skilled and equipped for this type of work I would
    > suggest you give it to a service centre to put on a new connector for
    > you. It is a difficult repair for someone who is not experienced with
    > this type of work. If you cross some of the wires, make a short, or
    > make a cold solder connection while doing this, it will not be a good
    > situation.
    >
    > This would not be a very expensive repair when done by a service centre.
    >


    The question is, is it worth getting a 14" monitor professionally repaired?
    IMO unless there is something very special about this monitor it is scrap.
    Especially considering it is likely there's an internal fault, it doesn't
    appear to be the broken pins causing the problem.

    Dave
    Dave D, Jul 28, 2003
    #5
  6. drake

    Dave D Guest

    "drake" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.
    >
    > 4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    > fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.
    >
    > Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these?
    >
    > I've looked around, and it seems the only way to salvage the monitor
    > is to either replace the
    > cable or the connector... both ways involve a lot of work. (But if
    > this is the only way, I will do it.
    > Will the small wires inside the cable have identifying coloured
    > insulation... or will I have
    > to use a multimeter? Is there any link to a site describing how to
    > rewire a new connector?)
    >
    > Dumb Idea: Can I replace the pins in the connector by clipped paper
    > pins of same dimension/size?
    > Which I'll solder (or superglue) to keep in position? It seems this
    > should work fine... but it seems
    > too easy... what is the catch?
    >


    Don't do that, you risk damaging your graphics card.

    What does the monitor do, if anything? Does it stay in standby, missing
    colours, sync problems? A little more info would be very useful.

    Dave
    Dave D, Jul 28, 2003
    #6
  7. drake

    drake Guest

    > >
    >
    > Don't do that, you risk damaging your graphics card.
    >
    > What does the monitor do, if anything? Does it stay in standby, missing
    > colours, sync problems? A little more info would be very useful.
    >
    > Dave



    Ok... the screen is blank.. it does not switch on atall (or else you
    can hear a screen switch on with that "thishoooooooooooooooeeeeeee"
    sound.

    Only the LED is on, all the time. It does not blink atall (as it would
    if the RAM or something were lose). The comp is working fine with a
    borrowed monitor for now.

    Lars
    drake, Jul 29, 2003
    #7
  8. drake

    mike Guest

    drake wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a TVM 4LR VGA 14" computer VDU.
    >
    > 4 of the 15 pins in the cable connector are broken. The Monitor worked
    > fine when 3 were broken before. The broken pins are 5,9,12,15.
    >
    > Can anyone tell me which one is the critical pin amongsts these?
    >
    > I've looked around, and it seems the only way to salvage the monitor
    > is to either replace the
    > cable or the connector... both ways involve a lot of work. (But if
    > this is the only way, I will do it.
    > Will the small wires inside the cable have identifying coloured
    > insulation... or will I have
    > to use a multimeter? Is there any link to a site describing how to
    > rewire a new connector?)
    >
    > Dumb Idea: Can I replace the pins in the connector by clipped paper
    > pins of same dimension/size?
    > Which I'll solder (or superglue) to keep in position? It seems this
    > should work fine... but it seems
    > too easy... what is the catch?
    >
    > Your comments/advice will be appreciated.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Drake Lars


    The pins are usually hollow. PUt solder paste in the hole. Stick a tiny
    wire in the hole, slide on a pin from another connector. Heat to melt
    the solder paste. Plug it into the video card and don't ever take it
    out. The connection is not very strong.
    mike

    --
    Bunch of stuff For Sale and Wanted at the link below.
    400cc Dirt Bike 2003 miles $495
    Police Scanner, Color LCD overhead projector
    Tek 2465 $800, ham radio, 30pS pulser
    Tektronix Concept Books, spot welding head...
    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Monitor/4710/
    mike, Jul 29, 2003
    #8
  9. drake

    drake Guest

    mike <> wrote in message news:<>...

    > The pins are usually hollow. PUt solder paste in the hole. Stick a tiny
    > wire in the hole, slide on a pin from another connector. Heat to melt
    > the solder paste. Plug it into the video card and don't ever take it
    > out. The connection is not very strong.
    > mike


    Super idea!!! Thanks.


    Have you tried this before?

    Rishi
    drake, Jul 30, 2003
    #9
  10. drake

    mike Guest

    drake wrote:
    > mike <> wrote in message news:<>...
    >
    >
    >>The pins are usually hollow. PUt solder paste in the hole. Stick a tiny
    >>wire in the hole, slide on a pin from another connector. Heat to melt
    >>the solder paste. Plug it into the video card and don't ever take it
    >>out. The connection is not very strong.
    >>mike

    >
    >
    > Super idea!!! Thanks.
    >
    >
    > Have you tried this before?
    >
    > Rishi


    Yes, it works great.
    But I meant what I said about the solder paste.
    If you try to use wire solder, you'll just make
    a big mess. If you get solder on the outside of the pins
    it will ream out your video card connector, if it goes in at all.
    mike

    --
    Bunch of stuff For Sale and Wanted at the link below.
    400cc Dirt Bike 2003 miles $495
    Police Scanner, Color LCD overhead projector
    Tek 2465 $800, ham radio, 30pS pulser
    Tektronix Concept Books, spot welding head...
    http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Monitor/4710/
    mike, Jul 30, 2003
    #10
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