Mains wiring: GFCI won't fit in the box!

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by DaveC, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to find
    that it won't fit.

    The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above and
    below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside the
    opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.

    Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?

    This is a Levitron GFCI.

    Thanks,
    --
    DaveC

    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
     
    DaveC, Dec 6, 2003
    #1
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  2. Yes, there is a spacer available that adds about 3/8" to the box...it
    actually protrudes from the wall, but it is meant for just this situation
    and looks good. I dunno who has them...possibly Home Depot or Lowes. fyi,
    the ones I have seen are ivory plastic in color. if 3/8" isnt enough you may
    be able to stack them....pick up some long 6-32 screws while you are at it.

    The other possibility is to install a Wiremold type extension box....they
    are 3/4" deep (or deeper).


    "DaveC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to

    find
    > that it won't fit.
    >
    > The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above

    and
    > below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    > taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside

    the
    > opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.
    >
    > Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    > larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?
    >
    > This is a Levitron GFCI.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > --
    > DaveC
    >
    > This is an invalid return address
    > Please reply in the news group
    >
     
    User 1.nospam, Dec 6, 2003
    #2
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  3. DaveC

    James Sweet Guest

    "DaveC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to

    find
    > that it won't fit.
    >
    > The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above

    and
    > below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    > taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside

    the
    > opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.
    >
    > Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    > larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?
    >


    Another idea, is there an outlet elsewhere in the house that's electrically
    before the bathroom outlets on the same run? If so you could install the
    GFCI outlet there and it'll protect the bathroom outlets as well. The other
    option is a GFCI circuit breaker for the main service panel.
     
    James Sweet, Dec 6, 2003
    #3
  4. DaveC

    SQLit Guest

    "DaveC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to

    find
    > that it won't fit.
    >
    > The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above

    and
    > below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    > taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside

    the
    > opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.
    >
    > Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    > larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?
    >
    > This is a Levitron GFCI.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > --
    > DaveC
    >
    > This is an invalid return address
    > Please reply in the news group


    CONDUIT? What around the 1930's era? Do you have a ground wire?
    You could always cut a new box into the wall near the other one and put a
    blank plate on the original.
    Yikes that is hideous. Easiest bet is to use a wire mold box for the
    application.
     
    SQLit, Dec 6, 2003
    #4
  5. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 15:16:30 -0800, SQLit wrote
    (in message <irtAb.33412$9O5.312@fed1read06>):

    > CONDUIT? What around the 1930's era? Do you have a ground wire?
    > You could always cut a new box into the wall near the other one and put a
    > blank plate on the original.
    > Yikes that is hideous. Easiest bet is to use a wire mold box for the
    > application.


    No, I'd guess 60's. It's an apartment building, and the code disallows romex.

    No ground wire; the conduit serves that purpose. Otherwise, I'd consider
    taking off the conduit nuts and cutting down the threads of the couplers. But
    I can't do that... Well, I could, but don't want to. :)

    Thanks,
    --
    DaveC

    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
     
    DaveC, Dec 6, 2003
    #5
  6. I have no idea, here in Greece we put a GFCI in the main distribution panel
    for the whole installation (up to 4x63 A for 380 V line-to-line voltage).Of
    course, if it won´t fit the only possible solution would be to install a
    larger box.BTW, how much does an outlet with GFCI cost?Here, we charge 100
    euro for a 4X40 (RCCB is typed on the box, which means Residual Current
    Circuit Breaker).I usually prefer Geyer (german)ABB or Siemens.

    --
    Dimitris Tzortzakakis,Greece


    Ï DaveC <> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá óõæÞôçóçò:
    ...
    > Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to

    find
    > that it won't fit.
    >
    > The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above

    and
    > below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    > taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside

    the
    > opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.
    >
    > Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    > larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?
    >
    > This is a Levitron GFCI.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > --
    > DaveC
    >
    > This is an invalid return address
    > Please reply in the news group
    >
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Dec 7, 2003
    #6
  7. DaveC

    James Sweet Guest

    "Tzortzakakis Dimitrios" <> wrote in
    message news:br06p2$96d$...
    > I have no idea, here in Greece we put a GFCI in the main distribution

    panel
    > for the whole installation (up to 4x63 A for 380 V line-to-line

    voltage).Of
    > course, if it won´t fit the only possible solution would be to install a
    > larger box.BTW, how much does an outlet with GFCI cost?Here, we charge

    100
    > euro for a 4X40 (RCCB is typed on the box, which means Residual Current
    > Circuit Breaker).I usually prefer Geyer (german)ABB or Siemens.
    >
    > --
    > Dimitris Tzortzakakis,Greece


    Here a GFCI outlet is about $10, a 20A GFCI breaker for the main panel is
    around $30.
     
    James Sweet, Dec 7, 2003
    #7
  8. DaveC

    Guest

    On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 11:29:38 -0800, DaveC <> wrote:

    >Convinced my landlord to pay for a GFCI in each bathroom. Now I come to find
    >that it won't fit.
    >
    >The box is a single gang switch-box size with conduit connections above and
    >below. The box is deep enough, but the GFCI (being quite a bit fatter and
    >taller than a regular outlet) collides with the conduit fasteners inside the
    >opening. The most I can stuff the GFCI in the box is about half way.
    >
    >Is there any option other than ripping out the wall paneling and putting a
    >larger box that will accommodate the GFCI outlet?
    >
    >This is a Levitron GFCI.
    >
    >Thanks,


    The easiest solution is a Wiremold extension box. It will stick out
    of the wall, about an inch or less, but sure beats tearing the place
    apart. They look good, and can be painted to match the walls.
     
    , Dec 8, 2003
    #8
  9. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 17:47:36 -0800, wrote
    (in message <>):

    > The easiest solution is a Wiremold extension box. It will stick out
    > of the wall, about an inch or less, but sure beats tearing the place
    > apart. They look good, and can be painted to match the walls.


    I'm beginning to agree. I looked at regular plastic box extensions, but these
    create a gap between the wall and the plate.

    Wiremold seems to extend the box (so code is happy) and fill the gap between
    wall and plate (so owner is happy).

    Thanks,
    --
    DaveC

    This is an invalid return address
    Please reply in the news group
     
    DaveC, Dec 8, 2003
    #9
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