Knobs for rotary encoders

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Fred Bartoli, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. Fred Bartoli

    Fred Bartoli Guest

    I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    find anything yet.

    Any ideas?


    --
    Thanks,
    Fred.
     
    Fred Bartoli, Feb 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    > I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    > knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    > find anything yet.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    The machine shop. :)
     
    Winfield Hill, Feb 10, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Fred Bartoli

    Fred Bartoli Guest

    Winfield Hill a écrit :
    > On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    > <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    >> I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >> knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >> find anything yet.
    >>
    >> Any ideas?

    >
    > The machine shop. :)
    >


    I'd prefer not. Have just found this one:

    http://www.mouser.com/search/refine.aspx?Ntt=506-KN1751AS1/4

    but color isn't good (it's natural Al, or black anodized) and at a hefty
    $23.
    What do they think?


    --
    Thanks,
    Fred.
     
    Fred Bartoli, Feb 10, 2007
    #3
  4. Spehro Pefhany wrote:
    >
    > I've got quite a few 32mm diameter ~15mm high black anodize encoder
    > knobs with metal (aluminum) knurled shell over plastic (for 6mm metric
    > D-shaft push-on). Maybe you could paint them. ;-)


    To go with your stock of encoders? They're not weighted, are they?
     
    Winfield Hill, Feb 10, 2007
    #4
  5. Fred Bartoli

    Eeyore Guest

    Fred Bartoli wrote:

    > I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    > knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    > find anything yet.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    Sifam ?

    Graham
     
    Eeyore, Feb 10, 2007
    #5
  6. On 10 Feb 2007 03:54:12 -0800, the renowned "Winfield Hill"
    <> wrote:

    >On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    ><fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    >> I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >> knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >> find anything yet.
    >>
    >> Any ideas?

    >
    > The machine shop. :)


    I've got quite a few 32mm diameter ~15mm high black anodize encoder
    knobs with metal (aluminum) knurled shell over plastic (for 6mm metric
    D-shaft push-on). Maybe you could paint them. ;-)



    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
    --
    "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
    Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
    Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Feb 10, 2007
    #6
  7. Fred Bartoli

    Fred Bartoli Guest

    Fred Bartoli a écrit :
    > Winfield Hill a écrit :
    >> On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    >> <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    >>> I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >>> knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >>> find anything yet.
    >>>
    >>> Any ideas?

    >>
    >> The machine shop. :)
    >>

    >
    > I'd prefer not. Have just found this one:
    >
    > http://www.mouser.com/search/refine.aspx?Ntt=506-KN1751AS1/4
    >
    > but color isn't good (it's natural Al, or black anodized) and at a hefty
    > $23.
    > What do they think?
    >
    >


    Finally mouser had the clue.

    Keywords are : knob + finger or fingertip + spinner.

    Lots of good hits, first of which is www.ehcknobs.com




    --
    Thanks,
    Fred.
     
    Fred Bartoli, Feb 10, 2007
    #7
  8. Fred Bartoli

    John Larkin Guest

    On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 11:52:37 +0100, Fred Bartoli
    <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:

    >I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >find anything yet.
    >
    >Any ideas?


    This uses a Rogan PT-5, costs $1.17.

    http://www.highlandtechnology.com/DSS/P400DS.html

    We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    knob.

    John
     
    John Larkin, Feb 10, 2007
    #8
  9. On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 09:00:58 -0800, the renowned John Larkin
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 11:52:37 +0100, Fred Bartoli
    ><fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >>knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >>find anything yet.
    >>
    >>Any ideas?

    >
    >This uses a Rogan PT-5, costs $1.17.
    >
    >http://www.highlandtechnology.com/DSS/P400DS.html
    >
    >We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    >use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    >spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    >knob.
    >
    >John


    The flat type with a finger depression might be better, but they are
    hard to find. Otherwise, I think ~15mm is better. What size is that
    one? Is it collet type?


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
    --
    "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
    Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
    Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Feb 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Fred Bartoli

    John Larkin Guest

    On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 12:39:02 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 09:00:58 -0800, the renowned John Larkin
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 11:52:37 +0100, Fred Bartoli
    >><fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    >>>knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    >>>find anything yet.
    >>>
    >>>Any ideas?

    >>
    >>This uses a Rogan PT-5, costs $1.17.
    >>
    >>http://www.highlandtechnology.com/DSS/P400DS.html
    >>
    >>We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    >>use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    >>spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    >>knob.
    >>
    >>John

    >
    >The flat type with a finger depression might be better, but they are
    >hard to find. Otherwise, I think ~15mm is better. What size is that
    >one? Is it collet type?
    >
    >


    This one is 19 mm at the base, tapered a bit, brass insert with
    setscrew. It's a little rubbery feeling, nice to grab and spin while
    you're looking at something else, like a scope screen. We tested some
    of the things with the finger depression and found them fairly awkward
    to use... to spin them very far, you wind up swiping them along the
    side of the knob a bunch of times, rather then trying to spin the
    slippery depression, which challenges my manual dexterity. Not to
    mention expensive. Well, OK, I mentioned it.

    15 mm would probably work even better, but it's starting to look less
    manly.

    John
     
    John Larkin, Feb 10, 2007
    #10
  11. Fred Bartoli

    john jardine Guest

    "Fred Bartoli"
    <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote in
    message news:45cdc655$0$2181$...
    > Winfield Hill a écrit :
    > > On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    > > <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    > >> I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    > >> knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    > >> find anything yet.
    > >>
    > >> Any ideas?

    > >
    > > The machine shop. :)
    > >

    >
    > I'd prefer not. Have just found this one:
    >
    > http://www.mouser.com/search/refine.aspx?Ntt=506-KN1751AS1/4
    >
    > but color isn't good (it's natural Al, or black anodized) and at a hefty
    > $23.
    > What do they think?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Thanks,
    > Fred.


    Big knobs were a problem, so I cast a few in gleaming white Polyester resin.
    :)



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    john jardine, Feb 10, 2007
    #11
  12. Fred Bartoli

    Eeyore Guest

    John Larkin wrote:

    > Fred Bartoli <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    > >knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    > >find anything yet.
    > >
    > >Any ideas?

    >
    > This uses a Rogan PT-5, costs $1.17.
    >
    > http://www.highlandtechnology.com/DSS/P400DS.html
    >
    > We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    > use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    > spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    > knob.


    You're absolutely right. I've found exactly the same myself. Big knobs with
    fancy caps may look cool but are relatively clumsy to use.

    Graham
     
    Eeyore, Feb 10, 2007
    #12
  13. Fred Bartoli

    Eeyore Guest

    Spehro Pefhany wrote:

    > the renowned John Larkin <> wrote:
    > >
    > >We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    > >use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    > >spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    > >knob.

    >
    >
    > The flat type with a finger depression might be better, but they are
    > hard to find.


    They look cute but aren't very nice to use IMHO.

    Graham
     
    Eeyore, Feb 10, 2007
    #13
  14. Eeyore wrote:
    >> We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    >> use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers

    > You're absolutely right. I've found exactly the same myself.


    In 1984 I visited the cockpit of a 747 over Greece. The pilot had
    maps out to show me, and as we passed a waypoint, he reached up
    to a knob to dial in a new bearing. Twiddle until the mechanical
    3-digit display had the right number, and a 300+ tonne plane made
    a coordinated turn to the new bearing. Said knob was barely bigger
    than a pencil eraser...I was suitably impressed!

    Clifford Heath.
     
    Clifford Heath, Feb 10, 2007
    #14
  15. Fred Bartoli

    Guest

    On Feb 10, 1:19 pm, Fred Bartoli
    <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    > I'd prefer not. Have just found this one:
    >
    > http://www.mouser.com/search/refine.aspx?Ntt=506-KN1751AS1/4
    >
    > but color isn't good (it's natural Al, or black anodized) and at a hefty
    > $23.
    > What do they think?


    You might check with Mouser about pricing on their web site. Last week
    I was look at re-ordering a knob from that series that I had paid $6 a
    year before. The web site showing around $13 and when I enquired how
    the price could increase so much they said it was an error, the actual
    price was around $7.
     
    , Feb 10, 2007
    #15
  16. On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 22:39:33 +0000, the renowned Eeyore
    <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Spehro Pefhany wrote:
    >
    >> the renowned John Larkin <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob is easier to
    >> >use. You can "twirl" it between your fingers and get a lot faster
    >> >spin, when you need it, than you can with a bigger official-spinner
    >> >knob.

    >>
    >>
    >> The flat type with a finger depression might be better, but they are
    >> hard to find.

    >
    >They look cute but aren't very nice to use IMHO.
    >
    >Graham


    The attraction from my perspective as an instrument designer is that
    they can be made relatively flat (sunk flush with a panel, even) and
    thus can be made fairly difficult for Joe Numbnuts user to snap off.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
    --
    "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
    Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
    Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Feb 10, 2007
    #16
  17. Fred Bartoli

    Ken Moffett Guest

    Spehro Pefhany <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 22:39:33 +0000, the renowned Eeyore
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Spehro Pefhany wrote:
    >>
    >>> the renowned John Larkin
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >We did a lot of testing and decided that a smaller knob
    >>> >is easier to use. You can "twirl" it between your
    >>> >fingers and get a lot faster spin, when you need it,
    >>> >than you can with a bigger official-spinner knob.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The flat type with a finger depression might be better,
    >>> but they are hard to find.

    >>
    >>They look cute but aren't very nice to use IMHO.
    >>
    >>Graham

    >
    > The attraction from my perspective as an instrument
    > designer is that they can be made relatively flat (sunk
    > flush with a panel, even) and thus can be made fairly
    > difficult for Joe Numbnuts user to snap off.
    >
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Spehro Pefhany


    I think also, at one time with multil-turn pots, the large
    finger-spin knobs were to let you spin through the full range
    quickly, yet have fine control (longer lever arm ratio knob-
    to-wiper) once you got near your "tweak" point. Or is the an
    obvious "given". :)

    Ken
     
    Ken Moffett, Feb 11, 2007
    #17
  18. Fred Bartoli

    Guest

    On Feb 10, 5:52 am, Fred Bartoli
    <fred._canxxxel_this_bartoli@RemoveThatAlso_free.fr_AndThisToo> wrote:
    > I'm in quest for 30-35mm diameter, 10-12mm height, ivory or light gray
    > knobs of the kind used on instrument using rotary encoders. Couldn't
    > find anything yet.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > --
    > Thanks,
    > Fred.


    Selco products.
    http://www.selcoproducts.com/
     
    , Feb 11, 2007
    #18
  19. Winfield Hill asked:
    > Spehro Pefhany wrote:
    >
    >> I've got quite a few 32mm diameter ~15mm high black anodize encoder
    >> knobs with metal (aluminum) knurled shell over plastic (for 6mm
    >> metric D-shaft push-on). Maybe you could paint them. ;-)

    >
    > To go with your stock of encoders? They're not weighted, are they?


    Spef?
     
    Winfield Hill, Feb 12, 2007
    #19
  20. On 12 Feb 2007 15:20:18 -0800, the renowned "Winfield Hill"
    <> wrote:

    >Winfield Hill asked:
    >> Spehro Pefhany wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've got quite a few 32mm diameter ~15mm high black anodize encoder
    >>> knobs with metal (aluminum) knurled shell over plastic (for 6mm
    >>> metric D-shaft push-on). Maybe you could paint them. ;-)

    >>
    >> To go with your stock of encoders? They're not weighted, are they?

    >
    > Spef?


    Oops, missed the original. No, they're not weighted (I measure 11 or
    12g), the aluminum is just for the (literally) cool feel and the
    relatively sharp knurls (too sharp to be injection molded) and the
    machined finish. Yes, they fit the encoders.

    Enjoying the cool weather: http://www.speff.com/snowdog.jpg


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
    --
    "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
    Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
    Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Feb 13, 2007
    #20
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