How to Remove Blind Roll Pin

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Ol' Duffer, Nov 5, 2004.

  1. Ol' Duffer

    Ol' Duffer Guest

    I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.
    Anyone know of special tools or methods to remove such a
    thing? Or maybe I just destroy the old handle with a big
    nutcracker, sawzall, grinder, or whatever and turn myself
    a new one?
    Ol' Duffer, Nov 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Ol' Duffer" <> wrote in message
    news:cmg0ib$opu$0$...
    > I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    > thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    > to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    > air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    > roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.
    > Anyone know of special tools or methods to remove such a
    > thing? Or maybe I just destroy the old handle with a big
    > nutcracker, sawzall, grinder, or whatever and turn myself
    > a new one?


    Can you not turn the shaft and drill a relief hole to remove the pin ??

    --
    Regards ........... Rheilly Phoull
    Rheilly Phoull, Nov 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. Why not just drill it out? The pins are hard steel but they can be
    drilled.

    Rheilly Phoull wrote:
    > "Ol' Duffer" <> wrote in message
    > news:cmg0ib$opu$0$...
    >
    >>I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    >>thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    >>to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    >>air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    >>roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.
    >>Anyone know of special tools or methods to remove such a
    >>thing? Or maybe I just destroy the old handle with a big
    >>nutcracker, sawzall, grinder, or whatever and turn myself
    >>a new one?

    >
    >
    > Can you not turn the shaft and drill a relief hole to remove the pin ??
    >
    > --
    > Regards ........... Rheilly Phoull
    >
    >
    Bennett Price, Nov 5, 2004
    #3
  4. Ol' Duffer

    NSM Guest

    "Ol' Duffer" <> wrote in message
    news:cmg0ib$opu$0$...
    | I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    | thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    | to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    | air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    | roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.
    | Anyone know of special tools or methods to remove such a
    | thing? Or maybe I just destroy the old handle with a big
    | nutcracker, sawzall, grinder, or whatever and turn myself
    | a new one?

    www.lindsaybks.com is a good place to look for books that may help. I find
    it hard to believe that anyone would build a lathe that way. What is the
    make and model?

    N
    NSM, Nov 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Ol' Duffer

    Ol' Duffer Guest

    Oops! This was supposed to go to a different newsgroup.
    My newsreader sometimes gets confused and posts to the
    group I am reading instead of the group I created the
    message for. Fortunately this group has a lot of
    intelligent and tolerant people. Thanks for the ideas.
    Ol' Duffer, Nov 6, 2004
    #5
  6. Ol' Duffer

    Sue D Nim Guest

    Get a roll pin remover. This is not a joke. The tool is a special-nosed
    punch w/ a sharp edge and in the center of the punch is a point that fits
    the roll pin exactly.
    Sue D Nim, Nov 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Ol' Duffer

    budgie Guest

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 23:38:04 -0500, "Sue D Nim" <> wrote:

    >Get a roll pin remover. This is not a joke. The tool is a special-nosed
    >punch w/ a sharp edge and in the center of the punch is a point that fits
    >the roll pin exactly.


    Errr, it's a BLIND hole. Punching won't do anything helpful.

    Drilling may work, but it'll be painful. Drilling a relief from t'other side -
    if practical - sounds the best approach.
    budgie, Nov 6, 2004
    #7
  8. Ol' Duffer

    Van Gardner Guest

    Ol' Duffer <> wrote in message news:<cmg0ib$opu$0$>...
    > I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    > thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    > to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    > air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    > roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.
    > Anyone know of special tools or methods to remove such a
    > thing? Or maybe I just destroy the old handle with a big
    > nutcracker, sawzall, grinder, or whatever and turn myself
    > a new one?


    You did not say what size roll pin or whether you could get to the
    back side of the blind hole. Roll pins have a hole down the center
    and you could run a small drill down this hole to find out if the
    bottom of the hole is solid or just stopped up with something. By
    drilling down the center of the roll pin this would give you a pilot
    hole to locate where to drill from the other side.

    Van Gardner
    Van Gardner, Nov 6, 2004
    #8
  9. Ol' Duffer

    t.hoehler Guest

    "budgie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 23:38:04 -0500, "Sue D Nim" <> wrote:
    >
    > >Get a roll pin remover. This is not a joke. The tool is a special-nosed
    > >punch w/ a sharp edge and in the center of the punch is a point that

    fits
    > >the roll pin exactly.

    >
    > Errr, it's a BLIND hole. Punching won't do anything helpful.
    >

    Sue is exactly correct. You DRIVE the remover in, then carefully and
    squarely PULL the remover out and the roll pin with it. I have pulled a few
    this way, works most of the time. If you have not seen this tool, you might
    have a hard time visualizing this. I got a set from McMaster many years ago,
    like ez outs, they are not a panacea, but they can work in a jam and when
    they do, you stand there just marveling. (at least I do!)
    Regards,
    Tom
    t.hoehler, Nov 6, 2004
    #9
  10. << I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    roll pin. >>

    OD-

    Please forgive my ignorance, but what is a blind roll pin? How was it
    installed? Can it come out the way it went in?

    If it is one that can be accessed from one end only, then you should be able to
    screw something into it that will grip it. Perhaps tapping it would allow a
    screw to be inserted, that can then be pulled out.

    Fred
    Fred McKenzie, Nov 6, 2004
    #10
  11. Ol' Duffer

    t.hoehler Guest

    "Fred McKenzie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > << I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    > thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    > to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    > air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    > roll pin. >>
    >
    > OD-
    >
    > Please forgive my ignorance, but what is a blind roll pin? How was it
    > installed? Can it come out the way it went in?
    >

    Yeah, a blind roll pin is installed in a blind hole. You push it in, but
    heaven help you if you ever have to remove it. Sorta like those dinky,
    doofus axle caps on coaster wagon wheels. They shove on easy, but not made
    to remove. Sue Nim describes the roll pin puller, I have a set of them, they
    kinda look like a needle file, but one side has rather aggressive barbs. You
    push them into the roll pin hole, then gently and squarely pull the puller
    out, and, if the stars are correctly aligned and you had an extra bowl of
    Wheaties that morning, out comes the roll pin!
    Regards,
    Tom
    t.hoehler, Nov 6, 2004
    #11
  12. Are you able to drive a small drill inside the pin hole ?
    If yes, simply drill the handle througn the pin then, from the opposite
    side, carefully bore the hole until it reaches the roll pin.
    Then use a rod and a hammer to push the roll pin.




    "t.hoehler" <> a écrit dans le message news:
    jh8jd.53487$HA.50478@attbi_s01...
    >
    > "Fred McKenzie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > << I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    > > thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    > > to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    > > air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    > > roll pin. >>
    > >
    > > OD-
    > >
    > > Please forgive my ignorance, but what is a blind roll pin? How was it
    > > installed? Can it come out the way it went in?
    > >

    > Yeah, a blind roll pin is installed in a blind hole. You push it in, but
    > heaven help you if you ever have to remove it. Sorta like those dinky,
    > doofus axle caps on coaster wagon wheels. They shove on easy, but not made
    > to remove. Sue Nim describes the roll pin puller, I have a set of them,

    they
    > kinda look like a needle file, but one side has rather aggressive barbs.

    You
    > push them into the roll pin hole, then gently and squarely pull the puller
    > out, and, if the stars are correctly aligned and you had an extra bowl of
    > Wheaties that morning, out comes the roll pin!
    > Regards,
    > Tom
    >
    >
    Simon Cussonnet, Nov 6, 2004
    #12
  13. Ol' Duffer

    Richard Guest

    budgie <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 23:38:04 -0500, "Sue D Nim" <> wrote:
    >
    > >Get a roll pin remover. This is not a joke. The tool is a special-nosed
    > >punch w/ a sharp edge and in the center of the punch is a point that fits
    > >the roll pin exactly.

    >
    > Errr, it's a BLIND hole. Punching won't do anything helpful.
    >
    > Drilling may work, but it'll be painful. Drilling a relief from t'other side -
    > if practical - sounds the best approach.


    If it's a roll pin how about tapping threads into it, inserting a
    screw and levering it out?

    Grind a special tool if the roll pin permits that is basicly
    cylinderical with a small tab on the end to pass down the slot in the
    roll pin. Insert twist and pull out the pin??.

    Just a thought.

    Richard
    Richard, Nov 6, 2004
    #13
  14. Ol' Duffer

    Jim Adney Guest

    On 5 Nov 2004 13:52:11 GMT Ol' Duffer <> wrote:

    >I have a vintage lathe that needs to have the cross slide
    >thrust bearing shimmed. I'm not 100% certain, still need
    >to get more light on the subject and blow the hole out with
    >air, but I think the handle might be mounted with a blind
    >roll pin. Yes I agree this is a stupid way to build things.


    What brand of lathe is it? Something cheap might actually be made like
    this, while a real industrial lathe, especially an old one, would be
    more likely to be built to be serviced.

    Three possibilities come to mind:

    Drill out the roll pin with a carbide spade drill.

    Drill a hole from the opposite side so that you can drive the pin out.

    Check to make see if you can leave the handle attached and remove the
    handle with the shaft by releasing something at the other end of the
    shaft.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney
    Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney, Nov 6, 2004
    #14
  15. Ol' Duffer

    WbSearch Guest

    When I used to do development work on automatic transmissions. the valve bodies
    had blind roll pins to hold valves in. To remove them we used allen keys
    ground to a point. They were inserted in the pin and turned in the direction
    to tighten the roll while pulling the pin out of the hole.
    WbSearch, Nov 7, 2004
    #15
  16. Ol' Duffer

    Ol' Duffer Guest

    In article <R78jd.53426$HA.1519@attbi_s01>,
    says...
    > Sue is exactly correct. You DRIVE the remover in, then carefully and
    > squarely PULL the remover out and the roll pin with it. I have pulled a few
    > this way, works most of the time. If you have not seen this tool, you might
    > have a hard time visualizing this. I got a set from McMaster many years ago,
    > like ez outs, they are not a panacea, but they can work in a jam and when
    > they do, you stand there just marveling. (at least I do!)


    Messages arriving out of order here, as sometimes happens
    with UseNet. Anyway sounds like a possibility. Thanks.
    Ol' Duffer, Nov 7, 2004
    #16
  17. Ol' Duffer

    Ol' Duffer Guest

    In article <>, fmmc
    > Please forgive my ignorance, but what is a blind roll pin?
    > How was it installed? Can it come out the way it went in?


    A roll pin shoved into a blind hole, i.e. not drilled all
    the way through. A stupid way to build anything, in my
    opinion, but I guess they didn't figure anyone would ever
    need to take it back apart.

    > If it is one that can be accessed from one end only, then you should be able to
    > screw something into it that will grip it. Perhaps tapping it would allow a
    > screw to be inserted, that can then be pulled out.


    Maybe... Depends on how hard it is. I've seen them made
    from anything from soft cold-roll to hard spring stock.
    Sounds like a good chance to break a tap, and then there's
    something *really* hard stuck in the hole. Exhaust safer
    methods first(?) Thanks.
    Ol' Duffer, Nov 7, 2004
    #17
  18. Ol' Duffer

    budgie Guest

    On 6 Nov 2004 12:10:03 -0800, (Richard) wrote:

    >budgie <> wrote in message news:<>...
    >> On Fri, 5 Nov 2004 23:38:04 -0500, "Sue D Nim" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Get a roll pin remover. This is not a joke. The tool is a special-nosed
    >> >punch w/ a sharp edge and in the center of the punch is a point that fits
    >> >the roll pin exactly.

    >>
    >> Errr, it's a BLIND hole. Punching won't do anything helpful.
    >>
    >> Drilling may work, but it'll be painful. Drilling a relief from t'other side -
    >> if practical - sounds the best approach.

    >
    >If it's a roll pin how about tapping threads into it, inserting a
    >screw and levering it out?


    My experiences with roll pins is that they are under significant "radial"
    compression force. I really can't envisage that working, but hey in 40-odd
    years of engineering I've seen many surprises.

    >Grind a special tool if the roll pin permits that is basicly
    >cylinderical with a small tab on the end to pass down the slot in the
    >roll pin. Insert twist and pull out the pin??.


    I've rarely seen that slot present in a correctly sized roll pin when inserted.
    Same surprise caveat as above.
    budgie, Nov 7, 2004
    #18
  19. Ol' Duffer

    Jim Adney Guest

    On 07 Nov 2004 00:45:27 GMT (WbSearch) wrote:

    >When I used to do development work on automatic transmissions. the valve bodies
    >had blind roll pins to hold valves in. To remove them we used allen keys
    >ground to a point. They were inserted in the pin and turned in the direction
    >to tighten the roll while pulling the pin out of the hole.


    That's an interesting technique and I'm glad to hear of it, but those
    must have been spirol pins, not roll pins. The latter only go around a
    little less than once, so they aren't "directional."

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney
    Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney, Nov 9, 2004
    #19
  20. How about spot welding a ring to the pin and simply yanking it out?


    --
    Joe Leikhim K4SAT
    "The RFI-EMI-GUY"

    The Lost Deep Thoughts By: Jack Handey
    Before a mad scientist goes mad, there's probably a time
    when he's only partially mad. And this is the time when he's
    going to throw his best parties.
    **THE-RFI-EMI-GUY**, Nov 10, 2004
    #20
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