How much current does a flashlight battery offer?

Discussion in 'Electronic Equipment' started by wylbur37, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. wylbur37

    wylbur37 Guest

    For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    to the type of load that's on it).

    And does it differ according to the battery size?
    (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    or is it just that the D lasts longer?
    wylbur37, Sep 2, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > to the type of load that's on it).


    > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > or is it just that the D lasts longer?


    It depends. For AA cells, the digital cameras draw more than a half amp
    at times. D cells can handle much more than an amp. If you want the
    batteries to last longer, then the current drain should be less. We're
    talking about alkalines here.
    Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\, Sep 2, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. wylbur37

    Al Guest

    In article <>,
    (wylbur37) wrote:

    > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > to the type of load that's on it).
    >
    > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > or is it just that the D lasts longer?


    Google search yielded:

    http://professional.duracell.com/start.asp?section=product_data&page=alka
    line&hardload=chemistrylist&chemistry=alkaline&lang=english

    al
    Al, Sep 2, 2004
    #3
  4. "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > to the type of load that's on it).
    >
    > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    Two seperate ratings involved. The 'current' is limited by the internal
    resistance of the battery, the resistance of the load, and by the way the
    chemistry behaves. A dead short across even a AA battery, can produce
    currents over 10A, for a short time, with some battery designs (NiCad in
    particular). Yes, the available current does rise with battery size, with
    more volume for the chemistry, and areas/thicknesses for the electrodes.
    The second rating, is the mAHr rating. This gives a figure for how much
    current can be delivered for how long. This figure is normally based upon
    the current that will discharge the battery in 10 hours. So a battery with
    a 1000mAHr rating, should be able to deliver 0.1A, for 10 hours.
    Now a typical AA Zinc-Cabon battery might offer perhaps 1000mAHr, while a
    D cell will perhaps offer 4000mAHr. Note that the latter implies a 'test'
    current 4 times as high as that used on the smaller battery.
    Some battery chemistries function better at high discharge rates than
    others. So (for instance), a NiCad D battery, may well support operation
    at 50* it's 'ten hour' current, and still give perhaps 25% of the full
    capacity, while designs like zinc-air, will only deliver low currents,
    even into a dead short.
    When multiple 'capacity' versions of the same battery exist, the extra
    capacity is often gained at the cost of other features. So (for instance),
    on NiMh batteries, where versions with higher capacities exist, these
    often show higher internal resistance (so will work less well at high
    loads), and increased 'self discharge' rates (they will run down quicker
    when not in use).
    A typical zinc-carbon D cell, delivering half an amp, will run for perhaps
    4 hours. A high quality alkaline manganese dioxide battery into the same
    load, will top 20 hours. The internal resistance of the D cell, will
    typically be less than 0.2ohms, while the AA of the same type, may well
    have an internal resistance over 0.4ohm.
    Generall, AA batteries offer some of the best volumetric, and gravimetric
    power output (pack the most 'power' into the least weight, and volume).

    Best Wishes
    Roger Hamlett, Sep 2, 2004
    #4
  5. "Watson A.Name - \"Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\"" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > > to the type of load that's on it).

    >
    > > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > > or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    > It depends. For AA cells, the digital cameras draw more than a half amp
    > at times. D cells can handle much more than an amp. If you want the
    > batteries to last longer, then the current drain should be less. We're
    > talking about alkalines here.


    Here is what you need to know.

    acell Alkaline MN1300 1.5V 14AH D "D" CELL
    Duracell Alkaline MN1400 1.5V 7.0AH C "C" CELL
    Duracell Alkaline MN1500 1.5V 2.45AH AA "AA" CELL
    Duracell Alkaline MN1604 9V .565AH 9V "9V" SIZE
    Duracell Alkaline MN21 12V .038AH CAR ALARM REMOTE BATTERY
    Duracell Alkaline MN2400 1.5V 1.1AH AAA "AAA" CELL
    Jacques Carrier, Sep 2, 2004
    #5
  6. wylbur37

    CWatters Guest

    "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > to the type of load that's on it).


    GP 3000/3300 Sub C NiMH cells (not quite typical flashlight batteries) have
    been used in model aircraft to power motors drawing 150A+ (yes that's One
    hundred and fifty Amps). In shorts bursts I should add.

    http://ewc2004.users.btopenworld.com/BEFA/photographs.htm

    One team had a few cells explode - not surprising really.

    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=288470&stc=1
    CWatters, Sep 2, 2004
    #6
  7. wylbur37

    James Sweet Guest

    "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > to the type of load that's on it).
    >
    > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > or is it just that the D lasts longer?


    Batteries are rated in amp-hours, which is the amount of current that can be
    supplied for an hour (within a certain range). Even the lowly AA alkaline
    can probably supply over an amp for brief periods, a D will be capable of
    much more. When you get talking rechargeables some of them can supply tens
    of amps.
    James Sweet, Sep 3, 2004
    #7
  8. On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 02:39:41 GMT, "James Sweet" <> wrote:

    >
    >"wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >> all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >> (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >> to the type of load that's on it).
    >>
    >> And does it differ according to the battery size?
    >> (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    >> or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    >Batteries are rated in amp-hours, which is the amount of current that can be
    >supplied for an hour (within a certain range). Even the lowly AA alkaline
    >can probably supply over an amp for brief periods, a D will be capable of
    >much more. When you get talking rechargeables some of them can supply tens
    >of amps.
    >


    Non-Nicad cells are rated in Milliampere-hours, but the rate of discharge is
    very restricted, and I doubt you would get anything near an amp out of them due
    to the high internal impedance. They are designed for very low discharge
    currents.

    Nicad cells are a different beast, and up to 20 or more amps can be drawn
    short-term, in fact we have had battery pack links melted through
    short-circuits.

    I seem to remember that D cells are 4.5AH in Nicad and 15000 mAH in
    Alkaline-Manganese, 0.6AH for AA Nicad and 1500mAH for A-M. In all cases the
    Alkaline cells are much higher in nominal capacity, but that capacity is only
    available at very low discharge rates.

    Peter

    --
    Peter & Rita Forbes

    Engine pages for preservation info:
    http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel
    Peter A Forbes, Sep 3, 2004
    #8
  9. wylbur37

    CWatters Guest

    > Nicad cells are a different beast, and up to 20 or more amps can be drawn
    > short-term,


    Way more than that even. 70A is possible and recent Sub C size NiMH cells
    have been used at 150A (4 second bursts every 20 seconds until empty)
    CWatters, Sep 3, 2004
    #9
  10. "Roger Hamlett" <> wrote in message
    news:k0GZc.72$...
    >
    > "wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > > all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > > (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > > to the type of load that's on it).
    > >
    > > And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > > (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > > or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    > Two seperate ratings involved. The 'current' is limited by the

    internal
    > resistance of the battery, the resistance of the load, and by the way

    the
    > chemistry behaves. A dead short across even a AA battery, can produce
    > currents over 10A, for a short time, with some battery designs (NiCad

    in
    > particular). Yes, the available current does rise with battery size,

    with
    > more volume for the chemistry, and areas/thicknesses for the

    electrodes.
    > The second rating, is the mAHr rating. This gives a figure for how

    much
    > current can be delivered for how long. This figure is normally based

    upon
    > the current that will discharge the battery in 10 hours. So a battery

    with
    > a 1000mAHr rating, should be able to deliver 0.1A, for 10 hours.
    > Now a typical AA Zinc-Cabon battery might offer perhaps 1000mAHr,

    while a
    > D cell will perhaps offer 4000mAHr. Note that the latter implies a

    'test'
    > current 4 times as high as that used on the smaller battery.
    > Some battery chemistries function better at high discharge rates than
    > others. So (for instance), a NiCad D battery, may well support

    operation
    > at 50* it's 'ten hour' current, and still give perhaps 25% of the full
    > capacity, while designs like zinc-air, will only deliver low currents,
    > even into a dead short.
    > When multiple 'capacity' versions of the same battery exist, the extra
    > capacity is often gained at the cost of other features. So (for

    instance),
    > on NiMh batteries, where versions with higher capacities exist, these
    > often show higher internal resistance (so will work less well at high
    > loads),


    In my experience, the opposite is true. The newer high capacity AA
    Ni-MH cells of 2000 mAH and higher have very low internal resistance,
    and last longer in my digital camera than the older ones. And digital
    cameras, especially mine, with autofocus and flash, use a lotta current,
    probably much more than an amp at times. You might think, why does he
    seem to imply that the length of time has something to do with the
    internal resistance? Well, in this case, when the four AA cells start
    to get discharged, the camera starts to do things like shut off the LCD
    while the flash is recharging. And it takes longer to 'boot up' the
    camera when the batteries are low. Finally the camera's LCD won't come
    on and the battery symbol just flashes. Time for another set of freshly
    charged AA cells. But the cells aren't discharged that bad, their
    internal resistance has just gone up.

    > and increased 'self discharge' rates (they will run down quicker
    > when not in use).


    Yeah, that seems to be the case. I've left charged batteries in my
    camera case for a couple months and I notice they last a lot shorter
    time in the camera. So now I'm putting a post-it on the battery
    carrying case with the charging date. And I check them and recharge
    when they've sat around a couple months.

    > A typical zinc-carbon D cell, delivering half an amp, will run for

    perhaps
    > 4 hours. A high quality alkaline manganese dioxide battery into the

    same
    > load, will top 20 hours. The internal resistance of the D cell, will
    > typically be less than 0.2ohms, while the AA of the same type, may

    well
    > have an internal resistance over 0.4ohm.
    > Generall, AA batteries offer some of the best volumetric, and

    gravimetric
    > power output (pack the most 'power' into the least weight, and

    volume).
    >
    > Best Wishes
    >
    >
    >
    Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\, Sep 3, 2004
    #10
  11. wylbur37

    Al Guest

    In article <dnVZc.234945$-ops.be>,
    "CWatters" <> wrote:

    > > Nicad cells are a different beast, and up to 20 or more amps can be drawn
    > > short-term,

    >
    > Way more than that even. 70A is possible and recent Sub C size NiMH cells
    > have been used at 150A (4 second bursts every 20 seconds until empty)
    >
    >


    Many years ago I knew someone who worked at a cell manufacturing
    company. There was, ahem, a certain amount of leakage at the gate. After
    his car battery died, he used 6 "A" sized cells connected in series to
    start his Volkwagen. Yes, it was in the days when they used the 6V
    battery system.

    Al
    Al, Sep 3, 2004
    #11
  12. wylbur37

    The Phantom Guest

    On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:45:31 GMT, "CWatters"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >> all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >> (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >> to the type of load that's on it).

    >
    >GP 3000/3300 Sub C NiMH cells (not quite typical flashlight batteries) have
    >been used in model aircraft to power motors drawing 150A+ (yes that's One
    >hundred and fifty Amps). In shorts bursts I should add.


    I have a 50 amp full scale (panel type) ammeter with heavy copper
    sheet about 2 inches long attached to the terminals. Applying this
    dead short to a 2100 mah AA Panasonic NiMH, I get 40 amps! I can well
    believe that if you do this for long, you might get a burst cell.

    >http://ewc2004.users.btopenworld.com/BEFA/photographs.htm
    >
    >One team had a few cells explode - not surprising really.
    >
    >http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=288470&stc=1
    >
    The Phantom, Sep 3, 2004
    #12
  13. wylbur37

    The Phantom Guest

    On 2 Sep 2004 02:28:01 -0700, (wylbur37)
    wrote:

    >For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >(I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >to the type of load that's on it).
    >
    >And does it differ according to the battery size?
    >(does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    >or is it just that the D lasts longer?


    Go have a look here for the alkaline type cells:
    http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/alkconsumeroem.htm

    and here for the NiMH cells:
    http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/nimh.htm

    It's interesting to note that the internal resistance of the D
    alkaline (173 milliohms) is larger than than that of the AA cells (146
    milliohms).

    It's also interesting to note that the volume of a D cell is 6.9 times
    that of an AA cell, and the capacity of an alkaline D is 6.3 times
    that of an alkaline AA (numbers taken from the Energizer site).

    But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    cells, currently near the state of the art).

    It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.
    The Phantom, Sep 3, 2004
    #13
  14. wylbur37

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    The Phantom wrote:
    > On 2 Sep 2004 02:28:01 -0700, (wylbur37)
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >>all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >>(I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >>to the type of load that's on it).
    >>
    >>And does it differ according to the battery size?
    >>(does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    >>or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    >
    > Go have a look here for the alkaline type cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/alkconsumeroem.htm
    >
    > and here for the NiMH cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/nimh.htm
    >
    > It's interesting to note that the internal resistance of the D
    > alkaline (173 milliohms) is larger than than that of the AA cells (146
    > milliohms).
    >
    > It's also interesting to note that the volume of a D cell is 6.9 times
    > that of an AA cell, and the capacity of an alkaline D is 6.3 times
    > that of an alkaline AA (numbers taken from the Energizer site).
    >
    > But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    > cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    > cells, currently near the state of the art).
    >
    > It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    > squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.


    Hi...

    Think of capacity not in terms of volume, but
    rather as a function of exposed surface area.

    Ken
    Ken Weitzel, Sep 3, 2004
    #14
  15. wylbur37

    The Phantom Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 21:03:38 GMT, Ken Weitzel <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >The Phantom wrote:
    >> On 2 Sep 2004 02:28:01 -0700, (wylbur37)
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >>>all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >>>(I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >>>to the type of load that's on it).
    >>>
    >>>And does it differ according to the battery size?
    >>>(does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    >>>or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >>
    >>
    >> Go have a look here for the alkaline type cells:
    >> http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/alkconsumeroem.htm
    >>
    >> and here for the NiMH cells:
    >> http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/nimh.htm
    >>
    >> It's interesting to note that the internal resistance of the D
    >> alkaline (173 milliohms) is larger than than that of the AA cells (146
    >> milliohms).
    >>
    >> It's also interesting to note that the volume of a D cell is 6.9 times
    >> that of an AA cell, and the capacity of an alkaline D is 6.3 times
    >> that of an alkaline AA (numbers taken from the Energizer site).
    >>
    >> But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    >> cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    >> cells, currently near the state of the art).
    >>
    >> It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    >> squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.

    >
    >Hi...
    >
    >Think of capacity not in terms of volume, but
    >rather as a function of exposed surface area.
    >
    >Ken


    Think of a hollow cube, 1 inch on a side. Now take a bunch of 1 inch by 1 inch metal
    plates, .1 inch thick. 10 of them will fit in the cube, and with each plate having a
    surface area of 2 square inches (neglecting the edges), this will give a total of 20
    square inches of plate surface area in the cube. Now increase the size of the cube to 2
    inches on a side, and increase the plates to 2 by 2 inches. Now each plate has a surface
    area of 8 square inches, and 20 of them will fit in the cube for a total of 160 inches of
    plate surface area in the cube. The bigger cube has 8 times the volume of the smaller and
    8 times as much plate surface area will fit in the bigger cube. This same principle also
    holds if the plates are wound in a spiral and pressed into a cylinder, so the exposed
    surface area is in fact directly proportional to the volume of the container.
    The Phantom, Sep 4, 2004
    #15
  16. wylbur37

    James Sweet Guest

    "The Phantom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2 Sep 2004 02:28:01 -0700, (wylbur37)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > >all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > >(I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > >to the type of load that's on it).
    > >
    > >And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > >(does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > >or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    > Go have a look here for the alkaline type cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/alkconsumeroem.htm
    >
    > and here for the NiMH cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/nimh.htm
    >
    > It's interesting to note that the internal resistance of the D
    > alkaline (173 milliohms) is larger than than that of the AA cells (146
    > milliohms).
    >
    > It's also interesting to note that the volume of a D cell is 6.9 times
    > that of an AA cell, and the capacity of an alkaline D is 6.3 times
    > that of an alkaline AA (numbers taken from the Energizer site).
    >
    > But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    > cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    > cells, currently near the state of the art).
    >
    > It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    > squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.


    That and most rechargeable "D" cells are really just sub-C or even AA's in a
    D shell. You can get real D cells but they're expensive.
    James Sweet, Sep 4, 2004
    #16
  17. wylbur37

    Dr. Neutron Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 02:39:41 GMT, "James Sweet" <> wrote:

    >
    >"wylbur37" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    >> all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    >> (I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    >> to the type of load that's on it).
    >>
    >> And does it differ according to the battery size?
    >> (does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    >> or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    >Batteries are rated in amp-hours, which is the amount of current that can be
    >supplied for an hour (within a certain range). Even the lowly AA alkaline
    >can probably supply over an amp for brief periods,


    At the Energizer web site I referenced in another post, they say that the internal
    resistance of a fresh alkaline AA cell is .146 ohms. When I short a fresh alkaline AA
    cell with my 50 amp meter, I get 11 amps, just about what you get when you divide 1.5
    volts by .146 ohms.

    a D will be capable of
    >much more. When you get talking rechargeables some of them can supply tens
    >of amps.
    >
    Dr. Neutron, Sep 4, 2004
    #17
  18. "The Phantom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2 Sep 2004 02:28:01 -0700, (wylbur37)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >For the typical flashlight battery (AAA, AA, C, D),
    > >all of them are 1.5 volts, but how much current do they offer?
    > >(I'm guessing it's around 100 to 150mA, and it varies according
    > >to the type of load that's on it).
    > >
    > >And does it differ according to the battery size?
    > >(does a "D" cell offer more current than an "AA"?)
    > >or is it just that the D lasts longer?

    >
    > Go have a look here for the alkaline type cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/alkconsumeroem.htm
    >
    > and here for the NiMH cells:
    > http://data.energizer.com/datasheets/contents/nimh.htm
    >
    > It's interesting to note that the internal resistance of the D
    > alkaline (173 milliohms) is larger than than that of the AA cells (146
    > milliohms).
    >
    > It's also interesting to note that the volume of a D cell is 6.9 times
    > that of an AA cell, and the capacity of an alkaline D is 6.3 times
    > that of an alkaline AA (numbers taken from the Energizer site).
    >
    > But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    > cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    > cells, currently near the state of the art).
    >
    > It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    > squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.


    Baloney! They're putting _less_ into the D cells! The D Ni-MH cells
    that I've seen are just AA cells inside D sized shells.
    Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\, Sep 6, 2004
    #18
  19. wylbur37

    Dave Platt Guest

    In article <>,
    Watson A.Name - \"Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\" <> wrote:

    >> But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH AA
    >> cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    >> cells, currently near the state of the art).
    >>
    >> It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    >> squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.

    >
    >Baloney! They're putting _less_ into the D cells! The D Ni-MH cells
    >that I've seen are just AA cells inside D sized shells.


    Some yes, some no.

    It looks as if the Energizer DNH2 is a 2200-mAh AA-type cell in a D
    jacket... at an online price of $7 each at one dealer. YUCK.

    On the other hand, the "Powerizer NMH9500" from ZBattery.com is a 9500
    mAh battery, for $6 each.

    Sometimes, you do _not_ get what you pay for!

    --
    Dave Platt <> AE6EO
    Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
    I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
    boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
    Dave Platt, Sep 6, 2004
    #19
  20. "Dave Platt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > Watson A.Name - \"Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\"

    <> wrote:
    >
    > >> But the capacity of a NiMH D cell is only 3.7 times that of a NiMH

    AA
    > >> cell (calculated using 8500 mah for D cells, and 2300 mah for AA
    > >> cells, currently near the state of the art).
    > >>
    > >> It looks like the battery folks have been really working hard to
    > >> squeeze more into the NiMH AA cells.

    > >
    > >Baloney! They're putting _less_ into the D cells! The D Ni-MH cells
    > >that I've seen are just AA cells inside D sized shells.

    >
    > Some yes, some no.
    >
    > It looks as if the Energizer DNH2 is a 2200-mAh AA-type cell in a D
    > jacket... at an online price of $7 each at one dealer. YUCK.
    >
    > On the other hand, the "Powerizer NMH9500" from ZBattery.com is a 9500
    > mAh battery, for $6 each.
    >
    > Sometimes, you do _not_ get what you pay for!


    Exactly. They give you 1/4 the capacity for 1/2 the price. Simple
    economics - make more $ for less.

    That's the same thing that they are doing with the "USB 2.0" cables.
    Nobody realizes that that the USB 2.0 signals were intended to work over
    1.0 and 1.1 cables.

    > --
    > Dave Platt <>

    AE6EO
    Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\, Sep 6, 2004
    #20
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