how much current can AWG wire handle

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by panfilero, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. panfilero

    panfilero Guest

    Hello,

    Does anyone know where I can find out how much current specific gauges
    of wire can handle? I've looked up web pages on it, but can't figure
    out what they mean... for example at

    http://www.interfacebus.com/Copper_Wire_AWG_SIze.html

    There's a column that says: Current Carrying, and another that says
    Fusing Current

    I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG is says
    Current Carrying: 1.46
    Fusing Current: 58.4

    ? I don't get what they're saying.... other websites have been
    similarly confusing..

    Much Thanks
     
    panfilero, Dec 8, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. panfilero

    Eeyore Guest

    panfilero wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can find out how much current specific gauges
    > of wire can handle? I've looked up web pages on it, but can't figure
    > out what they mean... for example at
    >
    > http://www.interfacebus.com/Copper_Wire_AWG_SIze.html
    >
    > There's a column that says: Current Carrying, and another that says
    > Fusing Current
    >
    > I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    > 7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG is says
    > Current Carrying: 1.46
    > Fusing Current: 58.4
    >
    > ? I don't get what they're saying.... other websites have been
    > similarly confusing..


    Fusing current is pretty obvious isn't it ?

    Also beware of operation at elevated temperatures and derate when bundled
    or run in trunking.

    Graham
     
    Eeyore, Dec 8, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. panfilero

    Bob Eld Guest

    "panfilero" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can find out how much current specific gauges
    > of wire can handle? I've looked up web pages on it, but can't figure
    > out what they mean... for example at
    >
    > http://www.interfacebus.com/Copper_Wire_AWG_SIze.html
    >
    > There's a column that says: Current Carrying, and another that says
    > Fusing Current
    >
    > I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    > 7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG is says
    > Current Carrying: 1.46
    > Fusing Current: 58.4
    >
    > ? I don't get what they're saying.... other websites have been
    > similarly confusing..
    >
    > Much Thanks


    The current carrying capacity in the listed table is based on 700 circular
    mills per amp, a very conservative number for wire wound inside a
    transformer where heating is an issue.

    The National electric code specifies current carrying capacity for open
    wires or house wiring for example about twice that or 300 to 350 circular
    mills per amp. This gives 20 AWG wire about a 3 Amp rating.

    What is your application? What is the duty cycle? What is the thermal
    environment, how hot can it get? Is it in a transformer or in open air and
    how insulated? How much voltage drop can you tolerate?
     
    Bob Eld, Dec 8, 2008
    #3
  4. panfilero

    BobG Guest

    But before the wire gets too hot, there will probably be so much
    voltage drop that the voltage at the load is too low, so that might be
    the more important criterion.
     
    BobG, Dec 8, 2008
    #4
  5. panfilero

    Rich Grise Guest

    On Mon, 08 Dec 2008 08:09:02 -0800, panfilero wrote:
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can find out how much current specific gauges of
    > wire can handle? I've looked up web pages on it, but can't figure out
    > what they mean... for example at
    >
    > http://www.interfacebus.com/Copper_Wire_AWG_SIze.html
    >
    > There's a column that says: Current Carrying, and another that says Fusing
    > Current
    >
    > I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of 7.25
    > Amps, for 20 AWG is says
    > Current Carrying: 1.46
    > Fusing Current: 58.4
    >
    > ? I don't get what they're saying.... other websites have been similarly
    > confusing..
    >
    > Much Thanks


    You didn't read the rest of the page:
    "Current Notes:
    The current shown per wire size listed above is based on 1 amp/ 700
    Circular mils, other tables provide different current per wire size, and
    different current for open air ~ check your local electrical code for the
    correct current capacity [Ampacity]. The 1 amp/ 700 Circular mils seems
    to be the most conservative, other sites provide/allow for 1 amp per 200
    or 300 Circular mil. For shot wire lengths use 1A/200 Circular mil, for
    longer wire runs use 300 Circular mil, and for very long wire runs use
    the table above, 1 amp / 700 Circular mil.

    The current rating is listed based on permissible voltage drop and not
    conductor heating.

    The ability of a wire to carry a given amount of current is affected by a
    number of additional factors, which are not accounted for in the AWG
    table above. The ambient temperature of the surrounding air, wire
    insulation, and number of other wires bundled together [provided below].

    Ampacity relates to the ability of the conductor to carry current [amps]
    before the cable over heats. I understand there are hundreds of Ampacity
    tables for many different conditions. The numbers above are but one
    example. Ampacity Tables for many conditions:"

    Hope This Helps!
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Dec 8, 2008
    #5
  6. panfilero

    Phil Allison Guest

    "panfilero"

    >
    > I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    > 7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG



    ** This page say 20AWG is good for 11 amps when used for "chassis wiring" or
    wires mounted in mid air.

    http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

    Tallies with my experience.

    1 metre of 20AWG will dissipate about 6 watts at 11 amps when used this way.



    ...... Phil
     
    Phil Allison, Dec 8, 2008
    #6
  7. On Tue, 9 Dec 2008 09:58:11 +1100, "Phil Allison"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"panfilero"
    >
    >>
    >> I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    >> 7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG

    >
    >
    >** This page say 20AWG is good for 11 amps when used for "chassis wiring" or
    >wires mounted in mid air.
    >
    >http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm
    >
    >Tallies with my experience.
    >
    >1 metre of 20AWG will dissipate about 6 watts at 11 amps when used this way.
    >
    >
    >
    >..... Phil
    >

    AC 43.13-1B shows AWG 20 okay for about 16.5A if you don't mind 80°C
    rise (eg. very high temperature rated insulation in moderate ambient).

    That's for *one wire in free air*, deratings for bundles (two wires
    are a bundle), and altitude, of course, and the detailed calculations
    are shown for various situations. May be available on the FAA dot GOV
    website.

    Mostly you'll not want to get anywhere near those current levels or
    voltage drop will kill you.
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Dec 8, 2008
    #7
  8. panfilero

    Pete Wilcox Guest

    On Tue, 9 Dec 2008, Peter Hucker wrote:

    > Could someone buy Michael a sense of humour?
    >

    As soon as somebody buys you a clue. Your Siglines speak volumes -
    someone not sure enough about the relevance of his posts that he has to
    post a joke-de-jour as a sigline by way of an apology for his lack of
    wit... If you have a relevant response to make, then make it - otherwise
    leave this newsgroup to those who seriously want to discuss electronics!

    Regards,
    Pete.
     
    Pete Wilcox, Dec 9, 2008
    #8
  9. ? "Peter Hucker" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:eek:...
    > On Mon, 08 Dec 2008 17:06:55 -0000, Phil Hobbs
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> panfilero wrote:
    >>> Hello,
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know where I can find out how much current specific gauges
    >>> of wire can handle? I've looked up web pages on it, but can't figure
    >>> out what they mean... for example at
    >>>
    >>> http://www.interfacebus.com/Copper_Wire_AWG_SIze.html
    >>>
    >>> There's a column that says: Current Carrying, and another that says
    >>> Fusing Current
    >>>
    >>> I'm interested in figuring out if 20 AWG wire can handle steady DC of
    >>> 7.25 Amps, for 20 AWG is says
    >>> Current Carrying: 1.46
    >>> Fusing Current: 58.4
    >>>
    >>> ? I don't get what they're saying.... other websites have been
    >>> similarly confusing..
    >>>
    >>> Much Thanks

    >>
    >> Back in the day, the usual rule of thumb for low-frequency power
    >> transformers in continuous use was 1000 circular mils per amp, where a
    >> 'circular mil' is the square of the diameter in mils (thousandths of an
    >> inch), i.e. 1 circular mil = (pi/4) square mil. The 1000 circular mils
    >> per amp rule comes out to 5.07e-6 square metres per amp.

    >
    > Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > millimetre. A metre is considerably different to an inch.
    >

    No, we don't. We usually say mm.
    Rough comparison:
    #10->10 mm^2 , 35 A fuse for main residence
    #12->6 mm^2, 25 A for stove
    #14->4 mm^2, 20 A water heater
    #16->2.5 mm^2, 16 Awashing machine, dishwasher
    #18->1.5 mm^2, 10 A lighting
    These figures are for one live conductor in a conduit inside the wall.

    > P.S., what's a click?
    >
    > --
    > http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com
    > http://www.petersphotos.com
    >
    > An infantry brigade was training in the summer heat, learning
    > methods to counter Soviet offensive tactics. That summer, the
    > area had experienced an infestation of rattlesnakes. Officers
    > and NCOs were given one magazine of live ammunition to counter
    > this danger, as several men had already been bitten.
    >
    > So much ammunition was expended shooting, supposedly, at
    > snakes that the post commander demanded that every officer
    > and NCO who had shot at a snake present the dead snake as
    > proof that the expenditure of rounds was justifiable.
    >
    > The next day, the post commander entered his office and spotted
    > a shoe box on his desk. He opened it, revealing a sleepy and
    > sluggish, but very live, rattlesnake. Inside the box were twenty
    > expended cartridges, and a short note. The note said, "I missed!"

    When I was in Rhodes (east Greece), we were camping with my 542nd mechanized
    infantry battalion, and there were lots of scorpions. We had brought a
    wooden bank with us, and at bed time I saw a sergeant laying to sleep on the
    bench. I asked, 'Is sir something wrong, I could help' he said just leave me
    alone. I learnt from his colleagues that he found a scorpion under his
    pillow (in his tent) and the "brave" sergeant decided to sleep on the bench.
    Soldiers wished to be bitten, so that they could get sick leave.
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Dec 11, 2008
    #9
  10. panfilero

    Rich Grise Guest

    On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >
    > Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > millimetre.


    Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    have no reason to use it.

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Dec 12, 2008
    #10
  11. panfilero

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Rich Grise wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    >> millimetre.

    >
    > Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    > have no reason to use it.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Rich
    >

    Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.
     
    Sjouke Burry, Dec 12, 2008
    #11
  12. panfilero

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Peter Hucker wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry <> wrote:
    >
    >> Rich Grise wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >>>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    >>>> millimetre.
    >>> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    >>> have no reason to use it.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Rich
    >>>

    >> Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.

    >
    > Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?
    >

    Only when Easter and Christmas fall on the same day........
     
    Sjouke Burry, Dec 12, 2008
    #12
  13. panfilero

    krw Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:45:57 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >>
    > >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:33:49 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry <> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> > Rich Grise wrote:
    > >> >> >> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > >> >> >>> millimetre.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    > >> >> >> have no reason to use it.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Thanks,
    > >> >> >> Rich
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> > Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > That would be like getting an STD, just to prove you can.
    > >>
    > >> You object to the metric system? [scoffs]

    > >
    > >
    > > Small minds always scoff.

    >
    > I take it back, you are even more childish than Ian Field. You can sit next to him in my killfile. Go snuggle up, you'll get on well together.
    >

    Says the idiot limey who doesn't even know how to set up his
    newsreader.

    --
    Keith
     
    krw, Dec 12, 2008
    #13
  14. panfilero

    krw Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:55:44 -0000, krw <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:45:57 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:33:49 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry <> wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> > Rich Grise wrote:
    > >> >> >> >> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >> >>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > >> >> >> >>> millimetre.
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    > >> >> >> >> have no reason to use it.
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> Thanks,
    > >> >> >> >> Rich
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> > Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > That would be like getting an STD, just to prove you can.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> You object to the metric system? [scoffs]
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > Small minds always scoff.
    > >>
    > >> I take it back, you are even more childish than Ian Field. You can sit next to him in my killfile. Go snuggle up, you'll get on well together.
    > >>

    > > Says the idiot limey who doesn't even know how to set up his
    > > newsreader.

    >
    > My newsreader works just fine. Any problems you are experiencing are up your end.
    >

    No, dumbass, you are simply too stupid to realize you're phucked up.

    --
    Keith
     
    krw, Dec 13, 2008
    #14
  15. panfilero

    Eeyore Guest

    Rich Grise wrote:

    > On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >
    > > Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > > millimetre.

    >
    > Wrong.


    Yes they do, almost universally in the British speaking ones.


    > A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    > have no reason to use it.


    No, that's a THOU, for a thousandth of an inch.

    Graham
     
    Eeyore, Dec 13, 2008
    #15
  16. panfilero

    Rich Grise Guest

    On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:35:53 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry
    >> Rich Grise wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >>>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short
    >>>> for millimetre.
    >>>
    >>> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries
    >>> would have no reason to use it.
    >>>

    >> Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.

    >
    > Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?


    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Dec 13, 2008
    #16
  17. On Sat, 13 Dec 2008 22:30:58 GMT, Rich Grise <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:35:53 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry
    >>> Rich Grise wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    >>>>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short
    >>>>> for millimetre.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries
    >>>> would have no reason to use it.
    >>>>
    >>> Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.

    >>
    >> Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?

    >
    >If it ain't broke, don't fix it. ;-)
    >
    >Cheers!
    >Rich
    >


    Hucker is wrong again. 'mil' is not used in the metric system
    specifically because it was put in use in the US system. So mil is mil
    all over the world, and that measure is 0.001 inch.
     
    Archimedes' Lever, Dec 13, 2008
    #17
  18. panfilero

    krw Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Sat, 13 Dec 2008 00:38:33 -0000, krw <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:55:44 -0000, krw <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > In article <>,
    > >> > says...
    > >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:45:57 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    > >> >>
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 23:33:49 -0000, Michael A. Terrell <> wrote:
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> > Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 19:18:11 -0000, Sjouke Burry <> wrote:
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> > Rich Grise wrote:
    > >> >> >> >> >> On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 18:32:54 +0000, Peter Hucker wrote:
    > >> >> >> >> >>> Mil is confusing. A lot of folk in metric countries say "mil" short for
    > >> >> >> >> >>> millimetre.
    > >> >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> >> Wrong. A mil is 0.001 inch (short for milli-inch); metric countries would
    > >> >> >> >> >> have no reason to use it.
    > >> >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> >> Thanks,
    > >> >> >> >> >> Rich
    > >> >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> > Wrong. Being in a metric country mil means millimeter.
    > >> >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> >> Some day the US will catch up with the rest of us?
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> > That would be like getting an STD, just to prove you can.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> You object to the metric system? [scoffs]
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Small minds always scoff.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I take it back, you are even more childish than Ian Field. You can sit next to him in my killfile. Go snuggle up, you'll get on well together.
    > >> >>
    > >> > Says the idiot limey who doesn't even know how to set up his
    > >> > newsreader.
    > >>
    > >> My newsreader works just fine. Any problems you are experiencing are up your end.
    > >>

    > > No, dumbass, you are simply too stupid to realize you're phucked up.

    >
    > You haven't even stated the problem you're having. That's like putting your car into a garage and saying it's broken.
    >

    I certainly have, though you're obviously too stupid to remember.



    --
    Keith
     
    krw, Dec 14, 2008
    #18
  19. On Sun, 14 Dec 2008 14:13:15 +0000 (GMT), Stuart <>
    wrote:

    >no-one can be bothered to
    >say millimetres every time you want to pass someone a dimension.



    Lazy fucking retards.

    You do not say 'cent' for centimeter, or 'dec' for decimeter, and I use
    both terms in my use of the metric system.

    You guys are goddamned idiots considering that the rest of the world
    makes considerations for your weights and measures systems, yet you
    refuse to make any accommodations for those of others.

    I am quite sure that there are far more intelligent folk over there than
    the likes of you, asswipe.
     
    Archimedes' Lever, Dec 14, 2008
    #19
  20. On Sun, 14 Dec 2008 14:13:15 +0000 (GMT), Stuart <>
    wrote:

    >Continental europe has been metric for so long I doubt they would even
    >recognise the term the way you use it.
    >
    >Stuart



    You're a fucking idiot.
     
    Archimedes' Lever, Dec 14, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Andrew

    How much current can a PCB handle?

    Andrew, Aug 15, 2006, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    4,297
    przemek klosowski
    Aug 19, 2006
  2. panfilero

    how much current can AWG wire handle

    panfilero, Dec 8, 2008, in forum: Electronic Basics
    Replies:
    45
    Views:
    35,897
    Richard The Dreaded Libertarian
    Dec 22, 2008
  3. panfilero

    how much current can AWG wire handle

    panfilero, Dec 8, 2008, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    47
    Views:
    1,312
    Richard The Dreaded Libertarian
    Dec 22, 2008
  4. Rich Grise

    Re: how much current can AWG wire handle

    Rich Grise, Dec 8, 2008, in forum: Electrical Engineering
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,237
    Rich Grise
    Dec 8, 2008
  5. Rich.

    how much current can AWG wire handle

    Rich., Dec 8, 2008, in forum: Electrical Engineering
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    297
    Rich.
    Dec 8, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page