Homemade cat5 cable using existing phone line fails.

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Sam Nickaby, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. Sam Nickaby

    Sam Nickaby Guest

    I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.

    The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?

    Thanks
    Sam Nickaby, Mar 11, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Sam Nickaby" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:PxQf.28581$...

    >I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug"
    > and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >
    > Thanks


    To make a cat patch cord, you need to use cat 5 cable.

    DS
    David Schwartz, Mar 11, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Sam Nickaby

    Peter Kolbe Guest

    Pins 1 and 2 must be on one twisted pair
    Pins 3 and 6 must be on another twisted pair

    If you do not have pairs that are twisted together all the way through the
    cable, then you cannot use it.

    If they are not grouped specifically on the pairs, then there will be
    crosstalk, etc.

    Peter

    "Sam Nickaby" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:PxQf.28581$...
    >I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    >
    Peter Kolbe, Mar 11, 2006
    #3
  4. In comp.dcom.cabling Sam Nickaby <> wrote in part:
    > I use two ordinary phone line cords.


    This is usually flat silver satin. No-where close to Cat5.
    Strictly speaking, Cat5 describes an end-to-end link quality
    that should be certified. When components are marked "Cat5",
    it means that the mfr believes that they can be used to make a
    link that will pass Cat5 testing _iff_ you do everything right.


    > After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables are
    > supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check
    > the resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.


    Low resistance straight thru is not enough. Ethernet uses
    differential signals which must travel on balanced twisted pairs
    to avoid corruption. Electrons may be color blind, but they know
    who their dance [twist] partners are.

    -- Robert
    Robert Redelmeier, Mar 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Sam Nickaby

    Roy Guest

    Sam Nickaby wrote:
    > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >



    Your cable is not CAT5 since it doesn't have the right number of twists
    but then again you don't need CAT5. Your DSL modem probably runs at
    10Mbps which calls for CAT3 cable. CAT3 has less twists and most telco
    cable meets the criteria. The cable you have may be below that but it
    might not matter for a the short run. YMMV

    The link light would come on in any case so you have something else
    wrong. Your modem may require a cross over cable or you don't have it
    wired correctly (pin1 to pin1). You actually only needed two pair 1-2
    and 3-6.

    Correct that problem and then try your cable. If you don't get errors,
    you are just fine

    Roy
    Roy, Mar 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Sam Nickaby

    Carl Navarro Guest

    On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 10:41:24 GMT, "Sam Nickaby" <> wrote:

    >I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    >25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    >phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    >are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    >resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    >The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    >to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    >"network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    >mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >


    I'll feed the troll.

    You don't want to know what I think you did.

    Buy a long patch cord or call a professional or a better amateur.

    Carl Navarro
    Carl Navarro, Mar 11, 2006
    #6
  7. "Sam Nickaby" <> schreef in bericht
    news:eek:PxQf.28581$...
    >I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug"
    > and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    Did the equipment run when using an original (shorter) cat5 cable? Did you
    use the right pairs twisted? The colors of the ordinairy telco cable you
    used may differ from the cat5 ones, you know. What about your soldering
    skills? You measured for conductivity, did you also check for short circuit?
    (BTW, all CAT5 connectors I'm aware of are crimp types, where did you get
    these solderable things from? How do they look like?) Where did you get the
    information of the cat5 cable? Be aware that real cat5 cable has a higher
    quality and price that ordinary telco. The quality of your home industry
    product may not be good enough.

    petrus bitbyter
    petrus bitbyter, Mar 11, 2006
    #7
  8. At the risk of someone saying this thread is pathetic, I'll post an
    answer as there are some good points to consider.

    Sam Nickaby wrote:
    > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet.


    From what you are describing, it appears you have a simple DSL to
    computer hookup. Instead of extending the ethernet connection from the
    modem to the computer, why not simply place the modem next to the
    computer and extend the silver satin phone line to the modem.

    > I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords.


    As other guys have said, silver satin line cord won't work. Untwisted
    cable has no cross-talk immunity.

    > After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords.


    Typically CAT5 ethernet cable are straight-through, but
    DSL modem-to-computer cables are usually cross-over.

    > I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable.


    Those error messages usually indicate intermittent loss of copper
    continuity, even thought you are showing good continuity when you test
    the cables, they may not work when plugged in. My line of thinking is
    that you might be using modular plugs designed for solid conductor and
    silver satin is stranded wire. Although is more problematic the other
    way around - using a stranded wire modular connector with solid wire.

    The error message "Local Area Connection is now connected. This
    connection has limited or no connectivity" usually means you have an IP
    issue, but there can be two reasons for this. You computer's TCP/IP
    properties are set for dynamic IP, but your network is static IP *OR*
    you simply can't connect due to a cable problem.

    You may even get a message saying "Local Area Connection is now
    connected. Speed: 100.0 Mbps" when in fact its not working as that
    message only indicates you have copper continuity. I've seen this after
    someone stapled 50 feet of CAT5 to the baseboard. No error messages, but
    it just didn't work..period.

    BTW...just for grins, I just made up a 20 foot silver satin cord with
    568B modular ends for stranded cable. It said "Local Area Connection is
    now connected. Speed: 100.0 Mbps", but I couldn't even ping the two
    computers.

    > Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?


    Move the modem next to the computer and redo you ends with RJ-11 plugs.
    DecaturTxCowboy, Mar 11, 2006
    #8
  9. Sam Nickaby

    Rich Grise Guest

    On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 10:41:24 +0000, Sam Nickaby wrote:

    > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >
    > Thanks


    I've used cat 3 (ordinary flat telephone extension cable) for a 100' run,
    with cat 5 (RJ-45) connectors at each end - but I had to pay attention
    to which pins I hooked up:

    http://www.ertyu.org/steven_nikkel/ethernetcables.html

    I suspect you have a simple miswire, or I don't understand the question.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
    Rich Grise, Mar 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Carl Navarro wrote:
    > I'll feed the troll.
    >
    > You don't want to know what I think you did.
    >
    > Buy a long patch cord or call a professional or a better amateur.
    >
    > Carl Navarro


    Don't feel bad Sam. His posts seem to sarcastic replies indicate HE is
    the one that needs to see a professional.
    DecaturTxCowboy, Mar 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Rich Grise <> writes:
    >I've used cat 3 (ordinary flat telephone extension cable) for a 100' run,
    >with cat 5 (RJ-45) connectors at each end - but I had to pay attention
    >to which pins I hooked up:


    Flat telephone cable (silver satin) isn't Cat-3 cable. It would be
    known as voice-grade, rated good for maybe 5kHz. Cat-3 cable is round,
    looks just like cat-5 normally, just not as many twists per inch.

    It also depends alot on speed too. You can get away with alot for 10-Base-T.
    With todays stuff being all 100-Base-TX or 1000-Base-T, the specs are
    *alot* tighter.
    Doug McIntyre, Mar 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Sam Nickaby

    Don Bowey Guest

    On 3/11/06 2:41 AM, in article
    oPxQf.28581$, "Sam Nickaby"
    <> wrote:

    > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end. I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords. I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.
    >
    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable. Does this
    > mean that the cat5 won't accept the ordinary phone cables?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    No, it means you have something wrong.

    By the way, how many twists per foot did you put in your home-made "Cat 5"
    cable?
    Don Bowey, Mar 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Sam Nickaby

    Sam Nickaby Guest

    "Don Bowey" <> wrote
    > No, it means you have something wrong.
    >
    > By the way, how many twists per foot did you put in your home-made "Cat 5"
    > cable?


    There are no twists.

    The DSL modem-to-computer cables I have don't seem to have the
    cross-over cable, they are straight-through. I'd took a continuity test
    on each terminal and don't seem to find any crossover cable. But the
    link light comes up fine on the DSL modem but the link fails to
    work. The modular plug I use is made by AT&T model (700A8)
    part no. LR85625. The plug is normally designed for a cat5 cable
    with no soldering or crimping tools required but its large delta shape
    plug makes it possible to solder the telephone wire to the
    terminals. I'd also check for short circuits and found none. The
    phone wire isn't twisted, that may be problem. I'll have to run down
    to the electronics store and get a fresh set of modular plugs and cat5
    cables.

    The Internet connection works fine once I move the modem closer
    the PC using the 5-ft cat5 cable that came with the modem. Since
    we have two PC that don't use the Internet the same time, it
    makes sense to run a long cable to the other PC and just plug the
    cable to the modem. This also a good way to yank the cord once
    your kids stays up too late online.

    Thanks all
    Sam Nickaby, Mar 12, 2006
    #13
  14. Sam Nickaby

    Ben Jackson Guest

    On 2006-03-11, Sam Nickaby <> wrote:
    > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end.


    That's an RJ45 connector (the plastic bit that looks like a big phone
    plug, which is an RJ11). The connector is about the least important
    bit. It's the cable that's classified CAT5.

    > I use two ordinary
    > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords.


    I've never seen solder type RJ45 connectors. You need a crimping tool.
    For one cable it's not worth it. For many, it is.

    > I then check the
    > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.


    DC connectivity is fine to check your work if you used the right
    materials. If you used ordinary satin (flat) wire then you may find
    a connection but it would not work.

    > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable.


    That supports your claim of proper end-to-end wiring, but shows what
    happens if you use inferior cable. The link speed negotiation is very
    slow compared to data speeds, so the NWAY autonegotiation works and then
    the link fails.

    Buy some other cable and try again. Use CAT5, or if you're cheap, use
    CAT3 as others have suggested. If it's not round, it's not going to
    work. You don't need all 4 pairs, only 2 (look at a good ethernet
    connector, you need the green and orange pairs). For a daily use cable,
    get stranded wire or your cable will be very stiff.

    --
    Ben Jackson
    <>
    http://www.ben.com/
    Ben Jackson, Mar 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Sam Nickaby

    Sam Nickaby Guest

    "Ben Jackson" <> wrote
    >
    > That's an RJ45 connector (the plastic bit that looks like a big phone
    > plug, which is an RJ11). The connector is about the least important
    > bit. It's the cable that's classified CAT5.
    >
    > I've never seen solder type RJ45 connectors. You need a crimping tool.
    > For one cable it's not worth it. For many, it is.


    Here's the modular plug I used http://support.avaya.com/edoc/docs/cib/cib28602.pdf

    They're not made for soldering but there's enough room to solder the phone
    line to the connectors. If the cable had been the correct gauge then soldering
    wouldn't be required.

    > DC connectivity is fine to check your work if you used the right
    > materials. If you used ordinary satin (flat) wire then you may find
    > a connection but it would not work.
    >
    > That supports your claim of proper end-to-end wiring, but shows what
    > happens if you use inferior cable. The link speed negotiation is very
    > slow compared to data speeds, so the NWAY autonegotiation works and then
    > the link fails.
    >
    > Buy some other cable and try again. Use CAT5, or if you're cheap, use
    > CAT3 as others have suggested. If it's not round, it's not going to
    > work. You don't need all 4 pairs, only 2 (look at a good ethernet
    > connector, you need the green and orange pairs). For a daily use cable,
    > get stranded wire or your cable will be very stiff.


    Thanks. Also, the link light comes up fine on the DSL modem but the link fails to
    work on the homemade cable. I will use the right cable.
    Sam Nickaby, Mar 12, 2006
    #15
  16. Sam Nickaby

    Kay Archer Guest

    "Ben Jackson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-03-11, Sam Nickaby <> wrote:
    > > I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    > > 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end.

    >
    > That's an RJ45 connector (the plastic bit that looks like a big phone
    > plug, which is an RJ11). The connector is about the least important
    > bit. It's the cable that's classified CAT5.
    >

    Not quite, the connectors (either plug or 110) should also be certifiable.

    > > I use two ordinary
    > > phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5

    cables
    > > are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords.

    >
    > I've never seen solder type RJ45 connectors. You need a crimping tool.
    > For one cable it's not worth it. For many, it is.
    >

    I'll agree that _occasionally_ making your own patch cable is a necessary
    evil (and I have the crimper and a tester). But, punching down a 110 is
    much more reliable. Buy reputable patch cables, punch down long runs. And
    a punch down tool is cheaper than a good crimping tool.



    > > I then check the
    > > resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.

    >
    > DC >>connectivity<< is fine to check your work if you used the right
    > materials. If you used ordinary satin (flat) wire then you may find
    > a connection but it would not work.
    >

    Continuity?


    > > The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    > > to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable

    unplug" and
    > > "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable.

    >
    > That supports your claim of proper end-to-end wiring, but shows what
    > happens if you use inferior cable. The link speed negotiation is very
    > slow compared to data speeds, so the NWAY autonegotiation works and then
    > the link fails.
    >
    > Buy some other cable and try again. Use CAT5, or if you're cheap, use
    > CAT3 as others have suggested. If it's not round, it's not going to
    > work. You don't need all 4 pairs, only 2 (look at a good ethernet
    > connector, you need the green and orange pairs). For a daily use cable,
    > get stranded wire or your cable will be very stiff.
    >

    Attenuation goes up with stranded cable...
    It is used for patch cables specifically for the flexibility. Again for
    long runs use solid cable and punch down at each end. Then plug your patch
    cables in at each end.

    Depending on where you run your cables, it may be necessary to purchase
    plenum grade cable. Check with your local building inspector.

    Or hire a pro to install your network. (g).
    Kay Archer, Mar 12, 2006
    #16
  17. Sam Nickaby

    Al Dykes Guest

    In article <>,
    Ben Jackson <> wrote:
    >On 2006-03-11, Sam Nickaby <> wrote:
    >> I made my own Ethernet cable to extend our DSL connections to
    >> 25 feet. I used a cat5 male connector on each end.

    >
    >That's an RJ45 connector (the plastic bit that looks like a big phone
    >plug, which is an RJ11). The connector is about the least important
    >bit. It's the cable that's classified CAT5.
    >
    >> I use two ordinary
    >> phone line cords. After I lined them up identically like what cat5 cables
    >> are supposed to I then solder and assemble the cords.

    >
    >I've never seen solder type RJ45 connectors. You need a crimping tool.
    >For one cable it's not worth it. For many, it is.
    >
    >> I then check the
    >> resistance on all eight terminals. They all check fine.

    >
    >DC connectivity is fine to check your work if you used the right
    >materials. If you used ordinary satin (flat) wire then you may find
    >a connection but it would not work.
    >
    >> The problem is when I plug one end of the cable to DSL modem the other
    >> to the PC the cable fails to work. I keep getting "network cable unplug" and
    >> "network cable plug" consistently until I unplug the cable.

    >
    >That supports your claim of proper end-to-end wiring, but shows what
    >happens if you use inferior cable. The link speed negotiation is very
    >slow compared to data speeds, so the NWAY autonegotiation works and then
    >the link fails.
    >
    >Buy some other cable and try again. Use CAT5, or if you're cheap, use
    >CAT3 as others have suggested. If it's not round, it's not going to
    >work. You don't need all 4 pairs, only 2 (look at a good ethernet
    >connector, you need the green and orange pairs). For a daily use cable,
    >get stranded wire or your cable will be very stiff.




    Real(tm) Catagory-rated cable ALWAYS has the specification written on
    the cable jacket, every couple feet. If it doesnt say CAT-3, CAT5,
    CAT-5e, etc. It's not an ethernet cable.






    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
    Al Dykes, Mar 12, 2006
    #17
  18. Sam Nickaby

    Al Dykes Guest

    In article <p3TQf.58364$>,
    Sam Nickaby <> wrote:
    >"Ben Jackson" <> wrote
    >>
    >> That's an RJ45 connector (the plastic bit that looks like a big phone
    >> plug, which is an RJ11). The connector is about the least important
    >> bit. It's the cable that's classified CAT5.
    >>
    >> I've never seen solder type RJ45 connectors. You need a crimping tool.
    >> For one cable it's not worth it. For many, it is.

    >
    >Here's the modular plug I used http://support.avaya.com/edoc/docs/cib/cib28602.pdf
    >
    >They're not made for soldering but there's enough room to solder the phone
    >line to the connectors. If the cable had been the correct gauge then soldering
    >wouldn't be required.
    >
    >> DC connectivity is fine to check your work if you used the right
    >> materials. If you used ordinary satin (flat) wire then you may find
    >> a connection but it would not work.
    >>
    >> That supports your claim of proper end-to-end wiring, but shows what
    >> happens if you use inferior cable. The link speed negotiation is very
    >> slow compared to data speeds, so the NWAY autonegotiation works and then
    >> the link fails.
    >>
    >> Buy some other cable and try again. Use CAT5, or if you're cheap, use
    >> CAT3 as others have suggested. If it's not round, it's not going to
    >> work. You don't need all 4 pairs, only 2 (look at a good ethernet
    >> connector, you need the green and orange pairs). For a daily use cable,
    >> get stranded wire or your cable will be very stiff.

    >
    >Thanks. Also, the link light comes up fine on the DSL modem but the link fails to
    >work on the homemade cable. I will use the right cable.
    >


    I don't think the link light is any better than DC continuity
    test. All it says is that there is a wire plugged in.

    For you, the worst outcome is that the power-up handshake determines
    that the link is capable of 100MB but as soon as the computer tries to
    send data at that rate it fails in some way that won't be obvious to
    you.

    A possible solution for a margional cable is to "nail" the link speed
    to 10MB. Your Computer can do this and your DSL gear will probably
    follow, properly.

    Make the setting 10MB/Half Duplex.

    If you *do* get this cable in operation, keep an eye on the error
    rates. Netstat is you friend.

    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
    Al Dykes, Mar 12, 2006
    #18
  19. In comp.dcom.cabling Doug McIntyre <> wrote in part:
    > Rich Grise <> writes:
    >>I've used cat 3 (ordinary flat telephone extension cable) for a 100' run,
    >>with cat 5 (RJ-45) connectors at each end - but I had to pay attention
    >>to which pins I hooked up:

    >
    > Flat telephone cable (silver satin) isn't Cat-3 cable. It
    > would be known as voice-grade, rated good for maybe
    > 5kHz. Cat-3 cable is round, looks just like cat-5 normally,
    > just not as many twists per inch.


    > It also depends alot on speed too. You can get away with
    > alot for 10-Base-T. With todays stuff being all 100-Base-TX
    > or 1000-Base-T, the specs are *alot* tighter.


    FWIW, I've pushed 10baseT through 50ft of silver satin
    without errors. I'm not surprised Rich could make 100ft.
    To minimize crosstalk, I used straddled pairs USOC-style.

    At 100, the same cable gave nice link-lights, but was
    full of errors.

    -- Robert
    Robert Redelmeier, Mar 12, 2006
    #19
  20. Sam Nickaby

    Panda Guest

    Sam,

    Normal telephone cables are Cat-3 and you need cat-5 or cat-5e cables
    with proper pin assignment when crimping RJ-45 connectors to both ends.

    I would rather buy ready made standard Cat-5e cable than buying
    crimping tool, RJ-45 connectors and a roll of cable and start a
    multi-session operation!

    Naim
    www.networkingland.com
    ..
    Panda, Mar 12, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. b.a. marcus

    cat5 cable tester

    b.a. marcus, Dec 30, 2003, in forum: Electronic Components
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    692
    b.a. marcus
    Jan 9, 2004
  2. john

    cat5 cable for RS485 and power ?

    john, Mar 18, 2005, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    1,467
    Joel Kolstad
    Mar 29, 2005
  3. Emanuele
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,000
  4. Cheers

    FS [Perth] cat5 twisted pairs cable $3 each

    Cheers, Jul 7, 2003, in forum: Hobby Electronics
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    321
    Cheers
    Jul 7, 2003
  5. StealthRT

    Running 175ft of cat5 solid cable with 12v/5v at the end

    StealthRT, Jul 19, 2012, in forum: General Electronics Chat
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    396
    Rleo6965
    Jul 23, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page