ELETRO STIMULATION (TENS) CIRCUIT

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by HIGHLOVER, Jan 18, 2004.

  1. HIGHLOVER

    HIGHLOVER Guest

    Someone have a eletro stimulator ou tens schematics diagram ?

    Thanks !
     
    HIGHLOVER, Jan 18, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On a sunny day (Sat, 17 Jan 2004 22:54:54 -0200) it happened HIGHLOVER
    <> wrote in
    <>:

    >Someone have a eletro stimulator ou tens schematics diagram ?
    >
    >Thanks !

    For brain or genitals?
     
    Jan Panteltje, Jan 18, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. HIGHLOVER

    Chris Guest

    HIGHLOVER <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Someone have a eletro stimulator ou tens schematics diagram ?
    >
    > Thanks !


    From the readme file of tens-dia.zip:

    THIS ZIP ARCHIVE CONTAINS DIGITALLY SCANNED JPEG FILES DETAILING THE
    SCHEMATICS OF THE T.E.N.S. UNIT FEATURED IN THE AUGUST 1997 ISSUE OF SILICON
    CHIP MAGAZINE.

    All files (TENS1-9.jpg) are in the order listed in Silicon Chip
    Magazine. To view these files in full detail, make sure that all features in
    your picture viewer that "fit" the image to your screen are turned off. The
    images are MORE than likely LARGER than your screen so you can see why I
    would ask that you turn off those "fitting" options. If the fitting features
    in your picture viewing software are turned on, zooming in will probably not
    work if you are trying to see words or symbols more closely.

    --RkAnE

    http://members.tripod.com/~kisu/tens-dia.zip

    I hope this is of help. Good luck.
    Chris
     
    Chris, Jan 18, 2004
    #3
  4. Be real careful here. I design medical grade TENS and MicroTENS
    systems as well as defibrillators and if you don't know what you are
    doing you can cause injury or death. Improper safegaurds can cause
    burns, muscle damage, even cardiac arrest. I would be very leary of
    following any schematics found in magazines or the internet. If you do
    venture into the endeavor make damn sure you use a medical grade or
    UL544 type isolation transformer if you plan on running the device on
    mains power.

    What are you attempting to do with the device?

    There are several cheap off the shelf units that will address many
    needs. Beware of cheesy new age devices "brain wave tuners" that
    purport to stimulate seratonin or eliminate addictions to drugs or
    smoking. They are poorly built and based on junk science.

    If you are not skilled in medical device design buy a unit!
     
    Product developer, Jan 18, 2004
    #4
  5. HIGHLOVER

    CFoley1064 Guest

    >Be real careful here. I design medical grade TENS and MicroTENS
    >systems as well as defibrillators and if you don't know what you are
    >doing you can cause injury or death. Improper safegaurds can cause
    >burns, muscle damage, even cardiac arrest. I would be very leary of
    >following any schematics found in magazines or the internet. If you do
    >venture into the endeavor make damn sure you use a medical grade or
    >UL544 type isolation transformer if you plan on running the device on
    >mains power.
    >
    >What are you attempting to do with the device?
    >
    >There are several cheap off the shelf units that will address many
    >needs. Beware of cheesy new age devices "brain wave tuners" that
    >purport to stimulate seratonin or eliminate addictions to drugs or
    >smoking. They are poorly built and based on junk science.
    >
    >If you are not skilled in medical device design buy a unit!



    This is *very* good advice, and I agree with jdurban entirely. I should have
    included the "play safe" disclaimer, and it's my fault it's not there.

    You also have to remember that the beneficial effects of the TENS device and
    relief of symptoms tend to decrease over time in any individual patient,
    especially if it is used frequently. Many people feel that, if they could only
    amp things up a little, they could get the same relief they used to get with
    the TENS device. That can cause problems for the reasons listed above. Not
    the right way to go at all. From what I've read and talking to people who use
    them, they're not intended to be a permanent solution, anyway. If you can't
    find one that works, you shouldn't try to make a higher current one to do the
    job. See the doc, try something else.

    Having said that, I don't think we can automatically assume the post had to do
    with self-treatment. For instance, it's also obvious you need medical
    isolation for an ECG if you're going to use it on a patient, but it's also
    something fun to play with to learn something about amplifiers. I did it
    myself once for fun long ago working off an app note, and got some interesting
    (if not electrically isolated to UL medical standards) results -- and lived to
    tell the tale.

    The article seems not to have much in the way of disclaimers or medical
    caveats, and I'm not sure why. They're not the type of thing you want to try
    if you have any heart problems.

    Play safe out there, but have fun, too.

    Good luck
    Chris
     
    CFoley1064, Jan 19, 2004
    #5
  6. "Product developer" <> skrev i en meddelelse
    news:...

    Agree.

    > There are several cheap off the shelf units that will address many
    > needs.


    In JackAss they had a stunt where several guys where sitting in underpants,
    each wired to one of the USD 5.99 bargain-bin "muscle excerciser" devices.
    They did a countdown and all went for the controls of the others, cranking
    of the "juice" on full power, causing all sorts of involuntary contractions
    in the opponents.

    That looked very funny!

    .....but that episode also convinced me that *I* would not buy such a thing.
     
    Frithiof Andreas Jensen, Jan 19, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Dirk Bruere at Neopax

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Dirk Bruere at Neopax, Jan 5, 2005, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    1,427
    Mike Fields
    Jan 13, 2005
  2. John Kent

    EPE TENS circuit.

    John Kent, Jan 17, 2007, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,619
    default
    Jan 21, 2007
  3. Jakthehammer

    Electrical Muscle Stimulation Problem

    Jakthehammer, Feb 25, 2008, in forum: Electronic Design
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    340
    Jakthehammer
    Feb 25, 2008
  4. Jakthehammer

    Electrical Muscle Stimulation Problem

    Jakthehammer, Feb 25, 2008, in forum: Electronic Repair
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    528
    Jakthehammer
    Feb 27, 2008
  5. mihov123

    direct current stimulation

    mihov123, Jul 5, 2010, in forum: Electronic Projects
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    490
    (*steve*)
    Jul 6, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page